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Dateline: Troy Paperback – August 8, 2006


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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Paul Fleischman offers a glimpse at the Trojan War through modern day newspaper headlines. By equating such events as Agamemnon offering sacrifice to the Greeks before sailing to Troy with George Bush's declaration of a national day of prayer after sending troops to the Persian Gulf, or the massacre of the Trojans by the Greeks to the My Lai incident in Vietnam, Fleischman helps young scholars understand the myth through present-day events and attitudes. Each page of text is enhanced by a collage of newspaper clippings relating to a particular piece of the myth. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Newbery Medalist Fleischman (Bull Run; Joyful Noise!) turns the Trojan War into an occasion for social studies, with the result that his audience may have to sacrifice some of the pleasures of reading in exchange for a fresh approach to history or current events. In this beautifully designed book, the author juxtaposes an unusually elegant redaction of the legendary conflagration at Troy with newspaper clippings that report events ranging from World War I to sociological experiments on babies' reactions to unattractive women. Each page of text faces such clippings, selected to highlight relevant themes. For example, the passage about the reunion of Paris, abandoned at birth, with his father, King Priam, appears opposite the beginning of a 1988 article from the Washington Post about a woman's search for the son she gave up for adoption in 1967. Other spreads refer to 20th-century wars (the two world wars, Vietnam, the Falklands, Korea, Cyprus, the Middle East) in support of Fleisch- man's thesis that war is futile: he concludes his abridged epic with the question "Who could tell the victor from the vanquished?" Laid against sophisticated graphic backgrounds, the clippings become handsome collages. Even so, the combination of elements remains inharmonious?the collages invite readers to digress from the story rather than determine its meanings for themselves. Instead of offering individual readers an unsupervised literary experience, this experiment succeeds chiefly as a catalyst for class discussion. Ages 12-15.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 860L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; Updated edition (August 8, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763630845
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763630843
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #416,610 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Paul Fleischman grew up in Santa Monica, California, the son of children's book author Sid Fleischman. Drawing on history, music, art, and theater, his books have often experimented with multiple viewpoints and performance. He received the Newbery Medal in 1989 for JOYFUL NOISE: POEMS FOR TWO VOICES, a Newbery Honor Award for GRAVEN IMAGES, the Scott O'Dell Award for Historical Fiction for BULL RUN, and was a National Book Award finalist for BREAKOUT. He lives on the central coast of California.

For more information, visit paulfleischman.net.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Govindan Nair on August 14, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I have read, both in my childhood and adulthood, many different versions of the Trojan War. The version in this book is well written for both adult and younger audiences.
What is most interesting in this book, however, is its attempt in every page to relate something about behaviors and practices in Ancient Greece to those we find in modern times. The author very ably does this by placing selected newspaper articles - mostly from the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s - across each page of the the text as the story of the Trojan War unfolds.
Thus, the book presents subtle comparisons between King Priam's consultation of the Priest of Apollo and a newspaper report of how former President Reagan and his wife used astrology; the competition among Greek godesses to find the fairest among them with a study in the 1990s by some Pennsylvania scientists on how infants respond differently to images of pretty and plain looking women; the spreading of disinformation during the Trojan War to the modern use of psychological warfare; and other comparisons between Ancient Greece and the modern world.
This book thus provides both adult and young readers a foundation to dialogue on how human civlization and institutions have both evolved - and also remained constant in some respects - throughout the ages. This is a very interesting and commendable effort by the author.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Kingsley Bishop on July 22, 2013
Format: Unknown Binding
Review for Dateline: Troy

This is an older book (1996). It it more suitable for young adults than for children.

The format of the book is a bit unusual as it conveys the story of Troy on the verso page (left side) and then on the right side shows torn out newspaper clippings of more current events that coincide or almost coincide with those long ago events. For example, in the part where three goddesses are competing for the prize of most beautiful in the Troy story, the recto page (right side) has a February 1992 newspaper clipping on how "Studies on beauty raise a number of ugly findings." That format continues throughout the book.

If you're just looking for the story of Troy for a young adult, just let them read the verso pages. However, the more modern newspaper clipping does have its uses. The young reader can enjoy the ancient story/legend and by having the more recent stories available, he/she is reminded that people still have pretty much the same challenges.

After thousands of years we still have all the same human traits such as violence, greed, murder, appeals to the gods, love, sorrow, weapons, and diplomats. The laws have changed as have the costumes but people are still people trying to solve the same problems.

On the book jacket the author states, "My best teachers in school were those who could take a seemingly remote topic and show its connection to my own life. I've tried to do the same with the Trojan War."

I very much agree that good teachers make lessons meaningful to our lives but I'm not sure how many young adults or middle schoolers can relate to the My Lai Massacre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on April 12, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is about how events over 1,000 years ago still occure in the news today. In the book Paul Fleishman recreates events of the Battle of Troy and finds clippings of newspaper articles that are similsr to the events. An example was during the Battle of Troy servants sacrificed cattle for Zeus so the Greeks could get an edge over the Trojans. The artical reads" Woman kills herself after war protest." As you can seeevents still make headlines about things similar to events that happened in the past. Overall I liked the book.
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Format: Paperback
The approach taken in the teaching of history in this book is rather unusual and in my opinion very successful. The epic Trojan War where the Greeks and Trojans fought for years is one of the linchpins of Western Civilization. That event is taken as the fundamental theme for this book, yet there are also references to modern times.
For each two-page section, on the left page there is a note about an aspect of the Trojan War. They range from descriptions of the battles to the undercurrents involving everything from the actions of the gods to the jealousies between the leaders. On the right page there is an image of pages from modern newspapers where the contents show that nothing about war has really changed over the course of several millennia. The text in the images of the newspapers demonstrates situations very similar to what took place in the Trojan War. Those that advocate peace when war is imminent are generally ridiculed and those that advocate war find that it was not the simple thing that they claimed it would be.
History is best learned when the events can be related to what has happened more recently. It is for that reason that I consider this book an excellent resource for teaching young people why ancient history is not really so ancient.
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By A Customer on March 2, 1998
Format: Hardcover
The book Dateline Troy was a book pretty much about war. I also liked this book because it had visuals to go with it like if you didnt understand a part in the book you could look over at the visual and maybe pick it up a little better. The book also didnt loose me in the middle it jumped right to the point. The only part i got confused was remembering the names of all of the Gods, Greeks, and the Trojans. This is one of the best books i have ever read maybe because of the war, but it was still good.
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