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Dating Without Novocaine (Red Dress Ink (Numbered Paperback)) Paperback – March 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Series: Red Dress Ink (Numbered Paperback) (Book 4)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Red Dress Ink; First Edition edition (March 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0373250142
  • ISBN-13: 978-0373250141
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,652,807 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Dentophobe Hannah O'Dowd is almost 30 and she's determined to find a husband. She and her cozy circle of single friends live in Portland, Oregon, a city of 2 million souls, roughly half of which are male. Hannah hatches a plan to find her one man in a million via free Internet dating services--and challenges her friends to do the same. Unfortunately, all of Hannah's dates are turning out worse than your average root canal.

Lisa Cach's Dating Without Novocaine is a witty, sexually frank look at what a smart self-employed woman might do to find the man of her dreams. Will she make the first move on Wade, the wildlife biologist who keeps asking her out but has yet to even hold her hand? Will she agree to a second date with Pete, the hunky cop with attention deficit disorder? Could she possibly be attracted to a wealthy computer engineer who paints his toenails gold? Hannah's sure the right guy is out there, it's just a matter of finding him.

Like Bridget Jones's Diary and television's Sex and the City, Cach's first contemporary romance presents a single girl who has great friends and a variety of unacceptable romantic prospects. Wiser than Bridget and warmer than Sex's Carrie, Hannah may find her man just in time. --Jennifer Lindsay

From Publishers Weekly

Talented seamstress Hannah O'Dowd cuffs men's pants to pay the rent, but while her hands hover at ankle-height, her attentions are focused a bit farther up. She's 29 and hasn't yet found her backyard barbecue guy: "I don't want to turn thirty and still not know who I'm going to marry," she gripes, setting the tone for this mild single-girl tale set in Portland, Ore. At least she has company in her loyal but flaky roommate, Cassie, who is taking belly-dancing classes to unblock her "sex chakra," and the more sensible Louise, a phone counselor at a crisis center. It's immediately obvious that Hannah is going to fall for their mutual friend Scott, a sweet and successful dentist who's allegedly off limits because he used to date Louise. Although there's never any doubt she'll end up with him, it's still satisfying when he gets her into the chair. In her first contemporary novel (after five romances), Cach is funniest in her descriptions of Hannah's dental phobia, and she adds a few touching scenes when Hannah's mother suffers a stroke. Unfortunately, the characters tend to toss around clich‚s rather than engage in meaningful dialogue. Even the young, single audience to which the novel is clearly pitched will find the heroine's dating fiascoes the gay guy trying to go straight, the cop with attention-deficit disorder old hat, but those in need of a dose of the tried and true may appreciate the familiarity. Agent, Linda Kruger.

Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.


More About the Author

Lisa Cach is the award-winning author of more than twenty-five romantic novels and novellas, ranging across sub-genres from Paranormal, Historical, Contemporary, and Erotica, to Young Adult. She is a two-time finalist for the prestigious RITA Award from the Romance Writers of America.

Lisa Cach was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, where she still lives today, somewhere between the perpetual blanket of clouds and the beds of moss and fern.

Lisa's professional background includes teaching conversational English in Japan, several years working the graveyard shift on a mental health crisis line, and teaching writing while sailing to the Amazon, Morocco, Russia, and everywhere in-between aboard the MV Explorer -- the ship used in the Semester at Sea college program. She has hiked the foothills of the Himalaya, trekked the jungles of Borneo, roamed the Carpathian Mountains of Romania, and paddled the Dordogne River of the Perigord Noir, in France. She has sailed the Caribbean as a working crew member of a research schooner, and through the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands on a small ship.

Her favorite book has always been Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre," while the only book to ever give her nightmares was Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Hound of the Baskervilles." If you can recommend a good ghost story that sends shivers up the back of the neck, she's all ears.

When not writing, she dabbles in drawing, piano, gardening, and cooking... all of which make her sound as if she belongs in the 19th century, but she'd miss the internet if she were stuck there.

Please visit her website at www.lisacach.com, or friend her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/lisa.cach

Customer Reviews

I had high hopes for this book.
Loves Books in MD
Overall this was one of the funniest Red Dress Ink Books I have read and so far I've read them all and loved them all..
Lizzie
I found the author's style flat, with too much reliance on tired cliches.
Tracy Dunne

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dianna Setterfield on November 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have been reading these Red Dress Ink books in the order in which they were published, so with Dating Without Novocaine only being my 4th one, I'm not sure if this statement holds merit or not, but it is my absolute favorite one so far! The writing seemed more intelligent, and the subject matter was more realistic to me. I am so pleased with it, I am now looking forward to many more contemporary novels by Lisa Cach.
As usual, this story is your typical single-girl-looking-for-love saga. Twenty-nine-year-old Hannah O'Dowd is determined to meet the man of her dreams before her 30th birthday. However, with only four months left to go, the prospects are getting very slim. So with the support of her circle of friends, Hannah kicks her plan into high gear and embarks on a dating whirlwind -- with some very hilarious results.
Sound like a cut-out of all the other single-girl books? It is for the most part; however, Lisa Cach has went one further step. Dating Without Novocaine has a special something -- a bright splash of red in the middle of a white wall -- that separates it from the rest. I thoroughly enjoyed the story, and despite its predictability, loved turning the pages to see how it would unfold. Hannah has a wonderful web of friends that help keep this story afloat, and Lisa Cach has done a fantastic job of fleshing each one to practically 3D-like proportions. A romantic, realistic romp of a read -- don't miss it!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "jkampel" on May 10, 2002
Format: Paperback
I've read enough Red Dress books to know that I shouldn't expect a masterpiece. I enjoy reading these books while commuting and to relax at night after a long day. For the most part these books have served their purpose but I have to say that Dating Without Novicaine was bordering on insulting. When I read the back of the book I was intrigued by the Oregon setting. Working in the dot com industry I'm all too familiar with the Portland techie types and I thought it would be refreshing to get a slice of life beyond NYC. I swear that on Page 4, if not sooner, I knew who Hannah was going to end up with. I mean at least try to throw us off a tad. There were definitely some funny moments but all in all this book doesn't have much going for it, compared with the others in its genre. Up till now I've been a loyal Red Dress reader but any more books like this and I'll have to cut the cord. Oh well.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Dunne on March 29, 2002
Format: Paperback
I was drawn to this book because it featured a main character, Hannah O'Dowd, who lived somewhere other than New York or London. Even more appealing was the fact that she had nothing to do with the publishing industry. And I found her dental phobia kind of endearing.
Unfortunately, as I delved deeper into this book, its charm began to fade. I found the author's style flat, with too much reliance on tired cliches. While there were some funny moments I found that they lacked originality. I found this to be the book's major flaw. Content-wise, the book is for adults, but it reads like a Sweet Valley High novel from a stylistic point of view.
I realize that the writers of "chick lit" do not aspire to be Kate Chopin. However there are many books in this genre that manage to be light and clever and well-written. Dating Without Novacaine does not fall into this category.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 27, 2002
Format: Paperback
I bought this book looking for a light, funny read, and it delivered. Hannah, the main character, is a "mistress of the seam" (i.e., a seamstress), who is looking for love in all of the wrong places. Her missteps are hilarious, and they keep the action moving along. Hannah's search for Mr. Man in a Million includes her three friends, all with dating woes of their own. The development of Hannah and her relationship with her friends is terrific. Some of the dialogue is simply priceless, and it had me laughing out loud.
Ms. Cach has written a few romances, but this book is definately planted in the real world, and Hannah has real world problems and real world sex. My only quibble with the book is that it was a little predictable.
I sincerely hope Ms. Cach has plans to write more books like this one.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 2002
Format: Paperback
I've read all of the RDI books, and this has to be the worst. I'll agree with the other reviewers who complained about the predictability, the homophobia, and the weak writing. And I'll up the ante with weak editing. Other RDI books have typos and spelling errors in them, but this one looks like no one even ran it through spell-check before they published it.
But the best part:
"...we followed her swaying, tiered gathers of orange with pink bric-a-brac..."
Lovely as the image of a hostess at a Mexican restaurant with knick-knacks swaying from her skirt is, this is a book whose narrator is a seamstress. You'd think she'd know the difference between rick-rack (the zigzag trim I'm assuming she was talking about) and bric-a-brac (snow globes and collectible spoons from Disneyland).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. McBride on June 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
I got as far as page 25 and realized I knew who would end up with whom. I was so irritated I checked the last couple of pages (something I've never done in my life- honestly) and sure enough, I was right. Also, the writing is too contrived. The main character, Hannah, attempted humor in virtually everything she said. Emphasis on "attempted."
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