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Daughter Am I Paperback – October 5, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Second Wind Publishing, LLC (October 5, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1935171194
  • ISBN-13: 978-1935171195
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,273,504 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

A group of spunky octogenarians joins a woman on a search to discover the truth about the grandparents she never knew she had. After inheriting the farm of her estranged, murdered grandparents, Mary Louise Stuart discovers photos and an address book in the Colorado farmhouse and becomes obsessed with finding out who her grandparents were and who would want them dead. With each question, another senior citizen joins the quest - former friends and gangsters with names like Crunchy, Iron Sam, Happy, Lila Lorraine. The mystery deepens with each stop in their whirlwind tour of the Midwest: who's following them? A love interest ensues between Mary and Tim Olsen, whose grandpa was good friends with her great-grandfather. While the author certainly researched the history of the Mafia, too many of the numerous historical asides - and subplots - are tacked on under the guise of story time, making the story drag with detail abut Wyatt Earp, the JFK assassination and bootleggers. But underneath the relentless bouts of story time is a delightful treasure-hunting tale of finding one's self in a most unlikely way. -- manuscript review by Publishers Weekly, an independent organization

Mary didn't know she had Grandparents till the lawyer called to tell her that she'd inherited everything from them. Turns out, the pair were murdered together. Her father won't talk about his parents and the more she digs, the more she wants to find out what happened to her mysterious family. -- Amazon Top Reviewer

About the Author

Pat Bertram is a native of Colorado and a lifelong resident. When the traditional publishers stopped publishing her favorite type of book -- character and story driven novels that can't easily be slotted into a genre -- she decided to write her own. More Deaths Than One and A Spark of Heavenly Fire are Bertram's first two novels.

More About the Author

Pat Bertram is a native of Colorado. When the traditional publishers stopped publishing her favorite type of book -- character and story driven novels that can't easily be slotted into a genre -- she decided to write her own. Second Wind Publishing liked her style and published four of Bertram's novels: Light Bringer, Daughter Am I, More Deaths Than One, and A Spark of Heavenly Fire. Second Wind also published Grief: The Great Yearning, a compilation of letters, blog posts, and journal entries Pat Bertram wrote while struggling to survive her first year of grief after the death of her soul mate. Bertram blogs about writing and the writing life at http://ptbertram.wordpress.com

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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This is a fun read that keeps you going.
S M Senden
Her characters are wonderful and flawed, old enough to have those tales to tell, and lively enough to have tales to build as well.
S. Deeth
I don't want to spoil it but its A MUST READ.
Dorothy A. Pecoraro

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By S. Deeth VINE VOICE on February 8, 2010
Format: Paperback
Teach teaches, Crunchy crunches, or would if he weren't getting too old, and other assorted folk of increasing years join up for the ride. I love the way the author collects her characters in Daughter am I, each interacting for just long enough to establish recognizable voice before the search moves on. The stories in this novel roll with the wheels of the bus, round and round through the tortuous history of Midwestern mobs, to the mystery of Mary's grandparents' demise... and on to a sort of grown-up Secret Seven treasure hunt, with all its curious side-journeys, dangerous foes, missing gold and mixed-up relationships.

Pat Bertram is a recently published author, and this is her third novel (already!). She's published with a small publisher called Second Wind, and if you haven't heard of her, or them, you might want to jump on the bandwagon now before Pat gets famous. She has a distinctive writing style, with good old-fashioned plots that drive forwards on the innocent enthusiasm of youth, and with characters that straightforwardly narrate their tales. But the stories Pat tells are thoroughly modern too, with up-to-date scientific and historical research, complex scenarios, and hints of next year's secrets and the next decade's headlines. Her characters are wonderful and flawed, old enough to have those tales to tell, and lively enough to have tales to build as well.

In this book I learned why the Syndicate's not the Mafia, how to read a serial number that's been filed off a gun, and how many people die per second in the United States. I learned about time and politics and attitudes, and even a bit about myself. There's gold in these pages, a gold standard you can really believe in, and treasure in the "elders" who seek it. Don't miss this book; don't avoid it just because you can't guess the genre. It's whatever you're looking for, and truly, while some of the characters may have been con-artists, that's not a con.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dorothy A. Pecoraro on January 30, 2008
This is the ultimate page turner. The author created a world so effortlessly, I turned pages unaware that I was turning them. I felt as if I was watching the stories unfold before me. The descriptions and dialogue are so real it is amazing storytelling. Mary's character is so endearing, so innocent yet strong willed and so likeable. The story has me hooked. If I could I would've read the entire book in one sitting. Once I got started I couldn't put it down. There is so much suspense and intrigue in just the first two chapters. I wish I could read the whole thing in one sitting.

I don't want to spoil it but its A MUST READ. Pat Bertram is a magician that has you spellbound and eager for more. This is a masterful display of writing and some of the best writing I have read in a long time!!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Malcolm R. Campbell on October 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
Colorado author Pat Bertram follows up "More Deaths Than One" and "A Spark of Heavenly Fire" with a mystery about a young woman on a discovery quest to learn who were grandparents were and why her father told her for many years they were dead.

When Mary Stuart is told by an attorney that her supposedly long-dead grandparents have just been murdered and have left their farm to her, she's more than a bit curious. Her father refuses to talk about them. Those who will talk are elder gangsters from the days of the big con who like sharing their memories and their view of the way the world works.

As Mary travels from town to town tracking down people who might have known her grandparents, those she's talked to already are more than happy to come along for the ride. What a wonderful group they are! For Mary, it's a very personal quest, learning about her heritage. It's also a dangerous quest, for the person or persons who killed her grandparents might be coming after her.

Pat Bertram has created a alternately humorous and suspenseful mystery. Her likable protagonist learns a lot about the world--and about herself--and she learns it quickly. She has to or she might be the next one to die. I highly recommend "Daughter Am I" to readers who like dangerous, fast-moving novels with both charm and depth.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M.Hoffman on December 22, 2009
Format: Paperback
Daughter Am I brings to life a gang of characters that I came to care about as much as I did about unraveling the mysteries of the protagonist's grandparents. Since I'm mostly a mystery reader, I want a good plot and usually have to give up on the rest of the package. Not in this case.

At the start of the tale, a young woman, Mary Stuart, unexpectedly inherits money from grandparents whom she never knew. In fact, her parents have lied to her all her life, telling her her grandparents were dead. In fact, they just died. Now, it seems she's inherited a farm. Mary innocently tries to find out a bit more about them, trying to figure out why they'd leave a farm to her, etc. She finds some clues in their old farmhouse. Then, when she finds out how they actually died, she embarks on a modern day quest and along the way acquires companions--friends of her grandparents. And what friends they are! I don't want to give anything away, but suffice it to say these aren't your ordinary old folks.

I've read Pat Bertram's other books and highly recommend all of them.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Deb J. Ledford on January 21, 2008
Pat Bertram provides a compelling beginning to DAUGHTER AM I. The dialogue is believable and true to her well-drawn and intriguing characters. Settings are very visual and I felt right there with her heroine, Mary. Foreshadowing as to what will come next is presented nicely as well. These few pages certainly make me want to read much more. An excellent choice as semi-finalist to the contest.
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