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Daughter of the Drow (Forgotten Realms: Starlight and Shadows, Book 1) Mass Market Paperback – September 9, 1996


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Product Details

  • Series: Forgotten Realms: Starlight & Shadows
  • Mass Market Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast (September 9, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 078690514X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786905140
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,076,680 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Elaine Cunningham published her first novel, Elfshadow, in 1991. Since then sheÕs written the Songs & Swords series and the more recent Counselors & Kings trilogy. Cunningham lives in New England. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

It was 1 of my fastest going books ive every read.
Nick Pearson
If you like Elaine Cunningham, The Underdark, The Drow, or a combination of all three, you will get your fix by reading this book.
Isaiah Roggow
A man that can bash some brains in but possesses some of his own as well.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Keith Tokash on June 24, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Without taking anything away from RA, (without whom I probably wouldn't have heard about the FR world) I would like say how refreshing it is to see a complex drow. While Drizzt is definitely thoughtful and easy to love, he always does the right thing. Lireal however, does not reject everything Drow, and this leads to an interesting character mesh.
As Lireal is chased out of Menzo, she discovers how many options there truly are in Toril. She travels with a virtous human warrior and the romance that develops between them is not only free from the moral condescension of Drizzt's love life, but filled with doubt and uncertainty. By the end of the book I found myself really rooting for the two to get together.
The two main characters themselves were great. I really cared about them. As mentioned above, Lireal doesn't always do the right thing. She uses her looks to her advantage, she doesn't reject Lolth, she's not above kicking men in the groin.
On the other hand she isn't evil. You can follow her internal debates as her Menzo heritage tells her to handle a situation one way, but some inner feeling disagrees. Overall she comes across as a fun-loving adventure seeker who doesn't know any better. Fyodor (her traveling buddy) is constantly trying to reform her, but reserves the moral judgements that he could have applied.
This book is great. The characters, their interaction, the alternate Drow gods introduced, this was a fine work by Elaine Cunningham and the next book "Tangled Webs" is a great follow-up so you don't have to worry about being left hanging.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 22, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love Drizzt and I wish the humans of Earth were all like him. I was very happy with this book. It takes us into the city of menzo and lets us know what happen after the drow war. For i as was wondering about that after i finshed R.A. Salvatore's books. I found that reading both of Elaine's books is important to understand the whole story.For true D&D fans know that there are good Drow as well as evil just like all other races. I hope that Drizzt and Liriel meet each other and become friends. Then Drizzt will know that he is not alone. That is what is so wonderful about TSR books, all the races blend together to make one whole adventure. I have read every single book of the forgotten realms and other worlds so i know it is true. If you love Drow and adventure then read Elaine's 2 novels of the underdark.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 3, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Daughter of the Drow" is a book that can stand on its own. No, it isn't in the tradition of R. A. Salvatore; the drow are portrayed differently, and even Menzoberranzan seems to have changed. But all of this is readily explainable; Elaine Cunningham's book is set in a time when Menzoberranzan itself is going through change, and the character of the book is a female drow mage. If the character of Liriel Baenre had been modeled on R. A. Salvatore's Drizzt, it would have been much less enjoyable, not to mention somewhat false. I thought this book was fascinating for portraying another side of the drow (the description of the nedeirra dance is particularly good), for the character of Liriel and the way she managed to be both evil and humorous at the same time, and for the character of Fyodor. Finally, two characters in fantasy who are going on a quest to solve a problem for themselves, not to save the world! That was a wonderfully refreshing idea. In short, this is a book that is different from the "traditional" books about the drow. Reader expectations, not the writing, are what would drag it down.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 7, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Liriel gave me a different perspective on the Underdark. While Drizzt struggles against the ways of his people with a passion, Liriel is trying to have the best of both worlds, in true Drow fashion. She's not really good, like Drizzt, or really evil, the way most Drow are depicted. She sits on the fence, almost true neutral. She does what's good for her, and you see that quite a bit in the novel. To put nicely, she's very "practical". To be blunt she's a bit of a brat. The only complaint I have about the book is that it makes the killing and intrigue you expect a little too light. Salvatore's Underdark was extremely tense and the Drow seem paranoid in turns. In DOTD, especially at the start of the book, it seems like good old fashioned high society backstabbing and squabbling. The fighting and killing described in the book left me kinda cold. Since they are Drow, maybe that was the intent... The positive part of this is that you see some of the drow culture come out. I didn't think Drow dressed up and went out to party until I read this book. They almost seem like they have...fun. The other Drow dieties thrown in are a nice touch, and I would like to see more of that in other novels. The book doesn't run quite as smoothly as the Dark Elf Trilogy did, but it's a good read if you want more Underdark.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca on August 7, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I love this book. I feel with the characters. I even find the bad guys interesting (I usually get bored with the vilians).
Maybe I like this better than others because I'm not a Salvatore fan. Only read the Icewind Dale trilogy, and wasn't impressed at all.
DotD has everything to make it great. It worked for me. I loved the way teh drow were. "Without joy." Striving for, not knowing it didn't exist. Liriel's first understanding of friendship was great. She never imagined a situation like that, a state of being like that, possible. To her frienship was hanging out with someone until they tried to kill her.
Yes, she was a spoiled brat. She was meant to be. Nobility and honor were things she had to learn. So was the reality of consequences for actions. She had to grow up. By the end of Tangled Webs, we believe she's done it well.
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