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Daughter Paperback – September 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press (September 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1550745379
  • ISBN-13: 978-1550745375
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.7 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,533,514 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Grade 6-8-Everything seems different as 14-year-old Sylvie Marchione moves toward her junior high graduation. Since her parents' divorce, her father doesn't seem to have time for her and her mother is becoming more and more unpredictable. From the opening scene, when Sylvie discovers her mother poised on a 10th-floor balcony railing, to her hospitalization at the end, this description of the effects of rapid Alzheimer's degeneration on a relatively young woman and her family grips readers in horrified fascination. Sylvie's first response is denial, but as her mother's behavior becomes increasingly bizarre, she accepts the support of a neighbor. A new boy at school has a similarly afflicted grandmother; he and his family offer information and practical help, and Sylvie's father returns to make financial arrangements and relieve her of some supervisory duties. While all this is going on, the girl neglects her friend Marissa, the eldest in a family with an alcoholic and physically abusive mother. Marissa's disintegrating home situation is not sufficiently explored and is, perhaps, needlessly dramatic as a foil for the protagonist's problems. However, their reconciliation is a sign that Sylvie's own life can go forward.
Kathleen Isaacs, Edmund Burke School, Washington, DC
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

In this fairly convincing portrait of a teenager coping with her mother's onset of Alzheimer's disease, Sylvie, 14, has always been an excellent student, even through her parents' divorce. Her grades begin to slip, however, as her beautiful, talented mother, Marianne, starts behaving in dangerously crazy ways. She can't tell the time, has forgotten how to cook, and their usually fastidious apartment has grown filthy. The book opens on the day Sylvie finds Marianne perched high on the balcony of their tenth-floor Winnipeg apartment, apparently ready to jump. Sylvie thereafter attempts to cope on her own, ignoring school, her piano lessons, and her best friend, Marissa, who is coping with her own abusive, alcoholic mother. Angry and embarrassed, Sylvie allows an elderly neighbor, Mrs. Rathbone, to help; discovers a sympathetic listener in a schoolmate, Paul; and finds that her father is more than willing to rejoin his family as they learn more about Marianne's diagnosis. Sylvie's initial confusion is authentic, and often heart-stopping; Moore makes vivid how much of a stranger Marianne becomes to her daughter. Less coherently limned are Sylvie's external reactions. While there are hints that she is dressing provocatively because of her mother's illness, the connection never becomes clear, while her early reliance on Mrs. Rathbone's interference is not in line with the rest of her furtive behavior. (Fiction. 11-13) -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on May 5, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Daughter
Can you imagine walking through the door after coming home from your school day and finding your mother hanging over the edge of the balcony getting ready to jump? Amy is going through a life changing experience with her mother. After several weeks of awkward behavior displayed by her mother she tries to convince her mother to go to the doctor to see what is going on with her. After going to the doctor's office her mother learns she is suffering from the disease Alzheimer's. Afraid to leave her mother was always on Amy's mind. If Amy was invited to a party or to go somewhere else with her friends she makes up a lie so that she can go home to her sickly mother.
This story has a surprise ending so I don't want to give it a way so, if you are enjoy reading books about suspense you would probably like to read this book. I would recommend this book because it's the type of book that will keep your attention focused on the book and you wanting to turn the page.
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By Kristy and Angela on November 1, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book takes you through the life of a young teenage girl that is faced with taking care of her mother that is suffering in the beginning stages of Alzheimer's disease. At the same time, Sylvie is dealing with fitting in at school and being a good friend while still maintaining good grades. Daughter provides a good introduction to the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease and how it affects a family.
Sylvie does not understand what is happening to her mother. Sylvie's mother can no longer perform her normal daily activities such as: working, cooking, and cleaning. As her world changes, Sylvie must learn to cope with the responsibility of taking care of her mother as her health deteriorates. Since Sylvie's parents are divorced and her father is no longer in the home, she must step into the parental role. In addition to Sylvie's worries at home, she is struggling at school with grades and friendships. Her grades are dwindling; she is on the verge of losing a lifelong friendship, and she has lost interest in her piano which provided an escape from reality.
We feel that Daughter would be very useful helping teenagers cope with the different struggles in teenage life and parent illnesses. The book is told from Sylvie's point of view which allows the reader to empathize with her feelings as well as her actions. This book is a heart-wrenching and inspiring story about the life of a brave teenage girl. It would be interesting for students in the 5th to 8th grade levels. Parents and teachers could use this book to promote the study of Alzheimer's disease and how it affects the mind, body, and family.
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By Kristy and Angela on October 21, 2002
Format: Paperback
This book takes you through the life of a young teenage girl that is faced with taking care of her mother that is suffering in the beginning stages of Alzheimer's disease. At the same time, Sylvie is dealing with fitting in at school and being a good friend while still maintaining good grades. Daughter provides a good introduction to the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease and how it affects a family.
Sylvie does not understand what is happening to her mother. Sylvie's mother can no longer perform her normal daily activities such as: work, cooking, and cleaning. As her world changes, Sylvie must learn to cope with the responsibility of taking care of her mother as her health deteriorates. Since Sylvie's parents are divorced and her father is no longer in the home, she must step into the parental role. In addition to Sylvie's worries at home, she is struggling at school with grades and friendships. Her grades are dwindling, she is on the verge of losing a lifelong friendship, and she has lost interest in her piano which provided an escape from reality.
We feel that Daughter would be very useful helping teenagers to cope with the different struggles in teenage life and parent illnesses. The book is told from Sylvie's point of view which allows the reader to empathize with her feelings as well as her actions. This book is a heart-wrenching and inspiring story about the life of a brave teenage girl. It would be interesting for students in the 5th to 8th grade levels. Parents and teachers could use this book to promote the study of Alzheimer's disease, how it affects the mind, body and family.
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