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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic tale of a girl's courage and love, May 21, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
As a 6th grader I think I had this book permanently checked out of my school's library for the entire year. Great adventure and suspense, a fascinating look into another culture, an extraordinarily brave girl and her love for her dog, and a deeply satisfying ending -- a perfect combination. I'm so glad it's still in print!
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So glad it's still in print!, December 4, 2002
By 
Celeste M. Harmer (Clifton Heights, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
I read this book voraciously from start to finish when I was in 7th grade and have never forgotten it. It illustrates how important it is to have faith in a dream and to go after what you want even when everyone tells you it's impossible. And if you've ever dearly loved a pet, this is the story for you.
Momo, a young Tibetian girl, yearns to own a Lhasa Apso, but an expensive pedigree dog like that is beyond her family's meager budget. Undaunted, Momo hopes and prays for one to come her way, certain that it will. Her faith and tenacity pay off when a traveling merchant presents her with an adorable Lhasa puppy, whom Momo promptly names Pempa. All is perfect in Momo's world until the day Pempa is stolen by thieves on their way to India. You will learn a lot about that part of the world as Momo tirelessly treks through Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, and finally India to retrieve her beloved pooch.
She stumbles into a lot of interesting characters along the way, making this story an even more enjoyable read.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Creative and Inspiring!, May 2, 2004
By 
This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
I thought that this book was great because it shows what an amazing relationship a child and a dog can have. It also is so very detailed and descriptive, that at some parts I almost thought I was reading a book of poetry. Momo stands up for herself and proves she can.
Beautifully written. Great Characters.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I read&loved this book as a girl, June 10, 2003
By 
Mary Collette List (Kalamazoo, Michigan United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
This book is a wonderful story&it is especially won-
derful to read in this the 50th anniversary of the achievment of
the summit of Mount Everest by Sir Edmund Hillary&Tenzing Norgay.
Momo showed courage as she made her way out of Tibet&down to In-
dia.I also loved the way it introduced another culture&religion.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Daughter of the Mountains, November 28, 2005
Like another reviewer, I read this book in junior high and never forgot it. I remember trying to make hot buttered tea, as the heroine drinks it all the time; I found it undrinkable. My granddaughter has a Lhasa Apso now and I've been trying to find the book - 7th grade was 45 years ago and I'd forgotten the title. Thanks to many online searches using: dog, Tibet, girl, childrens' book etc. here it is and I'm ordering it for her today.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As Refreshing As the Mountain Air Descibed in the Story!, May 26, 2011
By 
M. Lee (Long Beach, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
As a mother who screens everything her 12-year-old daughter reads, I admit to a soft spot for older books, because they are, if still in print, more likely to be written in grammatical English, and full and complete sentences. "Daughter of the Mountains" by Louise Rankin is one such book, beautifully descriptive of the climatic variations from the top of the Tibetan hills to the tropical rainforest heat of colonial India and the grimy streets of Calcutta. I found the dialogue very believable, and the way the simple plot is used to explore class and gender relationships very clever - perfect for, as said daughter pointed out below, younger readers. The only thing I felt was missing is the Notes that nowadays typically accompany historical tales, which explain what is true and what is imagined. It in no way detracts from a well-written story, however, and I'm so happy I stumbled on it at our library, we now have our own Amazon copy!
"The book, `Daughter of the Mountains,' by Louise Rankin was a great book.

"When Momo's dog, Pempa, is stolen by horrible traders, Momo embarks on an adventure of a lifetime. From the nasty Indians to the friendly, familiar Tibetans, Momo's trip down the mountain is one you will never forget. But even when Momo finally discovers where Pempa is, can she still get her beloved red-gold Lhasa terrier back in time? Or will the strange English woman who paid for Pempa return to England with her new dog?

"My favorite part was in the beginning, when Momo first sees a golden red terrier when she was four years old. Then she wishes and prays for one just like it for FIVE WHOLE YEARS till she gets one she calls Pempa.

"I would give the book five stars: two stars for the plot, two for the character and one for the sweetness of it all. The plot deserves two stars mostly because it is a pretty original story full of love, loyalty and the strength of a friendship between a girl and her dog. The characters deserve two stars because of how the author manages to combine realism and fairy-taleism in describing them. For example, I am know that there are still women around the world who try to keep children as their slaves, but because I have been lucky and never met one, that reminded me of the fairy tale of `Hansel and Gretel.'

"I would recommend the book to girls in 2nd, 3rd, 4th an, maybe 5th grades, typically. However, since I am a big softy at heart, I loved it, despite the fact I am twelve and am in 6th grade."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book!, November 17, 2008
By 
Lynette Rose (Redding, California) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
Set in the early 20th century, this story explores the culture and traditions of Tibet, as well as the bond of love between a young girl and her stolen Lhasa (Tibetan) Terrier.

As a proud parent of a Tibetan Terrier myself, I found the story to be both heartwarming as well as enlightening with regard to my own relationship with the little dog next to me, whose ancestors came from high in the mountains at the top of the world. As I read I could not help but wonder, if he was stolen from me, how far would I go to get him back.

I was truly amazed by the journey little nine year old Momo set upon all alone. She has no money, and only meager provisions, but without a moments hesitation she sets off to rescue her beloved pet. From high in the Himalayas the book follows her adventure as she walks nearly all the way to Calcutta, India. With only her determination and the love in her heart, as well as her strong belief in Buddhist traditions to guide her steps and keep her safe.

I highly recommend this tale as a book to be shared with a child or grandchild to encourage reading, or as the perfect bedtime story to be read a chapter at a time. I would also recommend it to anyone such as myself who just wants a little insight into the mystical appeal of the hairy little dogs from Tibet, that we have come to know and love as well as make a part of our family and homes.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nice ice!, March 23, 2014
This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
This is a beautiful story of determination, courage and adventure. Although one may think at first, that it is a reading just for children, surprisingly it offers much more for anyone who reads it.

PROS: The book is short and an easy reading. Besides the highly ethical virtues portrayed, the narrative is so detailed and compelling that one almost feels like traveling with Momo from her village in Tibet to Calcutta. Moreover, there are plenty of cultural references for people interested in cultural anthropology and human diversity. Even more, the faith and religious values of the Tibetan people are also demonstrated and to a great extend, the author shows the importance of spiritual foundations in human determination.

CONS: The only "con" I can think of is the fact that the story is not totally resolved. [Beginning of spoiler] Although at the end, Momo recovers her dog, one wonders how can she possibly make it back home by herself and this time carrying an expensive dog along [end of spoiler].

Conclusion: This is an excellent reading for families. I can see myself using it as a startup for a dialogue about human values, dreams, cultures, religions and persistence. Read it, you will enjoy the story and be inspired by it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Historically, Exciting, Good Values, November 30, 2013
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This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
This story is extremely informative about the terrain, geography, customs, religion, and lives of people in Tibet and surrounding countries in the 1940's before China took over Tibet. My junior high students and I all thought it was a page-turner of one adventure after another, and it emphasized important values throughout the story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear people - she didn't have a lhasa apso! He was a lhasa terrier!, October 20, 2013
This review is from: Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) (Paperback)
The lhasa apso is not the same as a lhasa terrier. Lhasa terrier was the original name for the Tibetan terrier.

Charming book.
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Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin)
Daughter of the Mountains (Newbery Library, Puffin) by Louise Rankin (Paperback - February 1, 1993)
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