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Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century Paperback – May 22, 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Wesleyan (May 22, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0819566764
  • ISBN-13: 978-0819566768
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,044,738 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...(R)eally good stories, some of which have been out of print for decades. While the essays offer content and history, you’ll look to this volume for the storytelling, first and foremost: If you’re going to read about big ideas, you might as well enjoy it.”—Sara Sklaroff, The Washington Post

Review

“Eleven excellent stories—some barely known, others already classics—with accompanying essays that will inspire you to read more. A wonderful introduction to the richness of feminist science fiction.” (Sarah LeFanu, author of In the Chinks of the World Machine)

More About the Author

I live in in Sydney, Australia with my husband, Scott Westerfeld. We're both writers. Many of our books are written far from home, because it's even more fun writing in places where you don't know anyone...

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on October 4, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Expertly compiled and deftly edited by science fiction expert and author Justine Larbalesier, "Daughters of Earth: Feminist Science Fiction in the Twentieth Century" is both a collection of eleven short stories by famous feminist science fiction authors and eleven analytical essays which accompany and explain the short stories displayed. Both the authors of the short stories and the authors of the critical essays are feminist science fiction experts. Some of the authors of the short stories include Octavia Butler, Gwyneth Jones, Leslie Stone, Kate Wilhelm, Pamela Zoline, Lisa Tuttle, Pat Murphy, and James Tiptree Jr. Critical essayists include, not in order, Lisa Yaszek, Josh Lukin, Wendy Pearson, Joan Haran, Veronica Hollinger, Andrea Hairston, and L. Timmel Duchamp. These are the famed jewels of feminist science fiction, and it is indeed a rare treat to have the entire volume and its companion essays to peruse. If you have ever read Octavia Butler "The Evening and the Morning and the Night," you will relish the companion essay, 'Praise Song to a Prophetic Artist,' by Andrea Hairston. Paving the way for future feminist writers and thinkers, these authors represent a rich composite vein to be mined at will. An amazing amount of detective work and scholarship went into this edition. "Daughters of Earth" is a gift to the readers of the twenty-first century, in hopes that they remember upon whose literary shoulders they are standing in the fields of science fiction, speculative fiction, and fantasy.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By TammyJo Eckhart VINE VOICE on October 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed all but one of the 11 stories in this book from 1927 to 2002. Even though I didn't enjoy Pamela Zoline's "The Heat Death of the Universe" I can see why it is an important story to include in this collection of some of the science fiction that can be seen as feminist. "seen as feminist" here is the key I think especially when you look at the essays paired with each story. A few of the essays were spot on -- looked at the author and the story in their historical context. Others rambled between sharing previous scholarship and trying to find multiple readings of the material one of which was a feminist interpretation. The 11 stories are intense and moving, challenging the reader while entertaining. I loved that they were organized chronologically because I could see a flow and development of the feminist voice. I wish a concluding essay had tied them all together to bring this out more.
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By B. Krueger on February 1, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wanted to find feminist science fiction and decided to start at the (historical) beginning. This book seemed to meet my needs best. I am nearly ready to start the third story and it is a real pleasure so far. The stories are quite fun, and the discussion/analysis is very educational for me.

I have read none of the really early sci-fi written by women, let alone the "pulp" stories that so fundamentally shaped the science fiction of later generations. It's really fascinating reading.

An extra plus for me is that it has great bibliography after the in-depth analysis of the story, author, etc. For someone looking for new "classic sci-fi" avenues to pursue, it's a fantastic (and unexpected) bonus.
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5 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Linda W. Purdy on June 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
The best work in Sci Fi during the 50's, 60's and 70's was by women, and a lot of the best stories are right here. Fantastic!
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