Kindle Price: $2.99

Save $17.00 (85%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Get the Free Kindle App

Enter email or phone number to get a link

Processing your request...

Daughters of Iraq Kindle Edition

43 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$2.99

Length: 288 pages Word Wise: Enabled Matchbook Price: $0.99 What's this?
For thousands of qualifying books, your past, present, and future print-edition purchases now lets you buy the Kindle edition for $2.99 or less. (Textbooks available for $9.99 or less.)
  • Thousands of books are eligible, including current and former best sellers.
  • Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. You can also see more Kindle MatchBook titles here or look up all of your Kindle MatchBook titles here.
  • Read the Kindle edition on any Kindle device or with a free Kindle Reading App.
  • Print edition must be purchased new and sold by Amazon.com.
  • Gifting of the Kindle edition at the Kindle MatchBook price is not available.
Learn more about Kindle MatchBook.

The Color of Secrets
The Midwife's Revolt by Jodi Daynard
Lizzie becomes entangled in a conspiracy that could not only destroy her livelihood—and her chance at finding love again—but also lead to the downfall of a new nation. Learn more

Editorial Reviews

Review

A latticework of personal tragedies and cultural history underpins Shiri-Horowitz's debut novel about immigrant lives in Israel, translated from the Hebrew by Shira Atik.... the novel is leavened with passion (above all else, for food, which is almost a fourth protagonist). The Twaina sisters' zest for life, despite setbacks, is seen in the dying Violet's rich evocation of the culture of Iraqi Jews and in matronly Farida's spirited foray to a beauty salon to have her hair cut, colored and styled. Such moments offset occasionally stodgy prose and some heavy-handed exposition. These are minor flaws, however, in a novel that brims with love for a community that no longer exists, and for the women who ensure that this lost community will not be forgotten.
A sympathetic tale of love, loss and loneliness highlighting a largely underrepresented community - "Kirkus Review"

About the Author

Revital Shiri-Horowitz is an experienced teacher and presenter to Jewish communities and audiences. Using her own life story and excerpts of her novel, Revital Shiri-Horowitz generates a warm and uplifting experience for the listener. Her overall mission is to connect her audiences to their roots so that they can be closer to themselves.
 
Revital Shiri-Horowitz was born and raised in Israel. As a kid, she wrote poetry and short stories. She's been writing in her journal almost every day since she was nine years old, and up to the time she met her husband, but never imagined that one day she would become a published author in more than one language, and in so many countries, and even continents.
 
Revital went on to earn a BA in Hebrew Literature and Geography from Tel Aviv University, an MA in Geography from Haifa University, and an MA in Hebrew Literature from Tel Aviv University.
 
She was an assistant professor of Geography in Haifa and Tel Aviv Universities, and has been an editor for Hebrew-language books.
 
Based in Seattle, Washington, and in Israel, Revital is the mother of four boys, married to Amnon for twenty years, writes poetry, runs a blog in "Haaretz," an Israeli newspaper, and is working on a second novel.

Product Details

  • File Size: 333 KB
  • Print Length: 288 pages
  • Publication Date: March 26, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004U34YM8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #350,098 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author

Revital Shiri-Horowitz is an experienced teacher and presenter to Jewish communities and audiences. Using her own life story and excerpts of her novels, Revital Shiri-Horowitz generates a warm and uplifting experience for the listener. Her overall mission is to connect her audiences to their roots so that they can be closer to themselves.

Revital Shiri-Horowitz was born and raised in Israel. As a kid, she wrote poetry and short stories. She's been writing in her journal almost every day since she was nine years old, and up to the time she met her husband, but never imagined that one day she would become a published author in more than one language, and in so many countries, and even continents.

Revital went on to earn a BA in Hebrew Literature and Geography from Tel Aviv University, an MA in Geography from Haifa University, and an MA in Hebrew Literature from Tel Aviv University.

She was an assistant professor of Geography in Haifa and Tel Aviv Universities, and has been an editor for Hebrew-language books.

Based in Seattle, Washington, and in Israel, Revital is the mother of four boys, married to Amnon for twenty three years, writes poetry, runs a blogs in "Haaretz," an Israeli newspaper, and in wordpress. Her second book "Hope to See You Soon" recently came out and earned already great reviews.

More facts:

* Born in Israel to Jewish Iraqi immigrants.
* Lived with a large extended Iraqi family, upon whom much of this book is based.
* Lived most of her life in Israel.
* Served in the Israeli Army.
* Earned BA's in Hebrew Literature and Geography from Tel Aviv University.
* Earned her MA in Geography from Haifa University.
* Earned her MA in Hebrew Literature from Tel Aviv University.
* Was an assistant professor of Geography in Haifa and Tel Aviv Universities.
* Taught Hebrew to foreign exchange students at Haifa University.
* Taught Hebrew in London, England to elementary school students, and in the US to Middle school students.
* Has written diaries, poems and short stories throughout her life.
* Has edited a poetry book and children book in Hebrew.
* Has been married to Amnon for 23 years, and is the proud mother of four
boys between the ages of 21 and 11.
* She lectures about her books all over the world, and loves doing that.
She loves to write and connect with people. Revital loves to travel and explore new places, and loves her dog Sheleg (snow in Hebrew).

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Lisa on September 14, 2011
Format: Paperback
Daughters of Iraq tells the story of Iraqi Jews from the points of view of three women. Sisters Violet and Farida grew up in Iraq. They lived a fairly good life until the politics of the region drove them to Israel. They had to make new lives for themselves. The third woman is Violet's daughter Noa. Born in Israel, Noa is discovering about her past through a diary written by Violet. These three stories are woven together with past and present combining to tell a marvelous tale of love, family, and endurance.

This book is a translation from the original Hebrew, so I feel there are times that it doesn't read as smooth as you would expect. However, this did not bother me. I had a bit of a hard time getting into it in the beginning as each chapter seems to change narrators and time periods. Once you get adjusted to this, you really get drawn in. I found there to be a quiet sureness to the plot. There are no twists and turns or startling revelations. Instead you get an amazing story of three women who are living remarkable lives, even if they may not appear so to the rest of the world. I especially felt for Noa, who is really embarking on a journey of self-discovery through school work and life. When her Aunt Farida gives her Violet's diary, Noa is able to learn even more about mother and her past.

One common theme for all three women was discovering their true home. Violet and Farida were torn from their home country and the life they knew so well. In Israel, things were much harder. They even lived in a tent for a while. Meanwhile, Noa has in some sense been running away from her home. When her mother was ill, she couldn't seem to face the reality of it. Noa never really understood herself or what it really meant to be "home.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By release the cure on June 13, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is a welcome addition to the canon of modern Jewish literature which is often dominated by the holocaust and events in Europe. Daughters of Iraq is a beautifully written and touching account spanning three generations of women as we learn about the migration from Iraq to Israel under the most difficult of circumstances. A key sub-plot is Noa's mums diary which acts as a thread linking the generations together and holding the key to family secrets. The prose in the book is well executed and the dialogue, which at times feels like a play reveals very human, well drawn characters. The historical events in the book give it a touch of authenticity which strengthens the story especially the nostalgic reminisces of Iraq. On the whole this is an inspirational story of hope, love, family and life
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Batchelder on May 30, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Revital Shiri-Horowitz's "Daughters of Iraq" weaves together the stories of three women: Two Jewish-Iraqi sisters Farida and Violet growing up and then fleeing Baghdad for Israel, and Violet's daughter Noa, living in modern Israel. As the story begins, Violet has died, and Noa is seeking her way in life. Noa gets her mother's diary from Aunt Farida, and we get to read it along with her.

Shiri-Horowitz is able to carry off the story from multiple points of view. I cheered Noa on as she learned to move forward with her life and love. Violet, dying of cancer, worried about her children and mused about life and her ravaged body. But my favorite character was Farida: she was quite the woman. A widow who still cooks like her family surrounds her, her body huge, her voice gentle and melodic. I'd love to meet her in real life.

Intertwined with the stories was some interesting history, too. Who knew that so many Jews fled Baghdad after Israel was formed? Or that a resistance force stayed behind? This book was a nice debut by Shiri-Horowitz, and I'm looking forward to more. I sure hope she brings Farida along!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Drayer on August 3, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
To me this book read like a young adult novel. I was expecting more intrigue but received Farida's obsession with food. There were a lot of words but did not create a relationship with any of the three main characters. There were a lot of hardship identified in the book but did not feel a part of those hardship. The book ended with Noa at a coffee shop reflecting back on her life and what she has learned and how she has changed. I tried to find the end of the story after Noa's reflections, but that was the end. It was an incomplete ending for me.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Anthony Blumfield on April 18, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In a twisting plot with intriguing characters Shiri-Horowitz grasps the attention of the reader in a novel that is both instructive and heartfelt. Through the main character, Noa, a young woman looking for meaning in our convolute world, we experience the journey of her ancestors, an established Jewish family in Iraq, to the newly formed state of Israel in the early `50s. Their hardships and triumphs shed light on a forgotten chapter of history, and help our protagonist make sense of her own destiny. Beautiful.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Man of La Book on September 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
"Daugh­ters of Iraq" by Revi­tal Shiri-Horowitz is a fic­tional story of three women from the same fam­ily. It is a story of emi­gra­tion seen through the eyes of two of the women and one who is first gen­er­a­tion Israeli.

Sis­ters Farida and Violet's fam­ily was being forced to move from Iraq due to their reli­gion. This event, which occurred in the 1950s, shaped their lives and changed them for­ever. Noa, Violet's daugh­ter also feels the effects of this event and the sto­ries of her mother and aunt shape the way she makes deci­sions in mod­ern day Israel.

"Daugh­ters of Iraq" by Revi­tal Shiri-Horowitz is a well writ­ten account of Jew­ish Iraqi fam­ily who is forced to immi­grate to Israel from Iraq in the 1950s. While the book was a bit dif­fi­cult to start, but once I got the rhythm, pac­ing and jumps in time I started to truly enjoy the story. While the book is billed as fiction/historical fic­tion it almost reads like a memoir.

The story is pre­sented in sev­eral for­mats. One of the two sis­ters, Vio­let, who has passed away after being sick is being remem­bered through her jour­nal entries. We get to know Violet's sis­ter, Farida, through her own words and her sur­round­ings. Violet's daugh­ter, Noa, a uni­ver­sity stu­dent, goes through a spir­i­tual jour­ney through­out the book deal­ing with love, loss and look­ing for some sort of mean­ing in life.

The book's theme is love in var­i­ous ways. Love between par­ents, sib­lings, cou­ples, aunts, daugh­ters, sons and even ex-lovers.

I also found it very inter­est­ing to read about the extreme change of going from a life of lux­ury in an upscale neigh­bor­hood in Bagh­dad to a tent in Israel.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?