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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny as always
I'm almost always amused by Dave Barry's books. Some of his humor is a bit juvenile but overall his books are generally worth the money. This one was no different and there were several laugh-out-loud sections, particularly when he discussed purchasing a car and his opinion of several cars, including the Aztek (the "Buttmobile"). His vision of the corporate world was...
Published on January 19, 2006 by Deborah Wiley

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good; could have been better
There's no doubt Dave Barry can be quite funny.

I laughed so hard I cried at times reading this book.

But some chapters were a bit dull.

I suspect this book was a bit of a rush job...could have been better with more effort.

Not worth the hardcover price.
Published on February 25, 2006 by Mr. Maska


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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny as always, January 19, 2006
By 
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I'm almost always amused by Dave Barry's books. Some of his humor is a bit juvenile but overall his books are generally worth the money. This one was no different and there were several laugh-out-loud sections, particularly when he discussed purchasing a car and his opinion of several cars, including the Aztek (the "Buttmobile"). His vision of the corporate world was also hilarious to me as I was one of the many individuals who suffered when Coca-Cola decided to change its formula; I mean, what were they thinking??? The Suze Orman shtick got a bit old but overall this book was well worth my time.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funnier than Karl Marx...Smarter than a monkey, January 23, 2006
By 
C. Wagner "cecilkunkle" (On the banks of the Wabash far away) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Sadly enough, Barry makes more sense than most of the economics professors, money managers, and state financial officials who I have met. Barry is indeed smarter than a monkey and funnier than Karl Marx. In the financial world, these are two wonderful qualities! His analysis of Social Security only has one major flaw, a better job than our federal friends have done, although I am sure he did not intend to be accurate. Frankly, pointy headed economics instructors should make this title required reading. Although most economic students are too boring to laugh, their boyfriends/girlfriends might get it. As difficult a task as it is to be funny throughout an entire book, Barry does a good job. Think about it. Who would you rather have telling you how to manage your money: some certified money flushing financial planner, or Dave Barry? Yipes! Watch out for the squirrels!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another great one from Dave, February 10, 2006
By 
D. Henderson (Las Cruces, NM, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you like Dave already, you'll love this book. If you're one of those people who thinks he's too juvenile and does too many 'booger jokes', you may llike this one more, because he doesn't get as goofy as that in this one. if you're one of those oddballs - and I still run across a lot of these people - who haven't even heard of him until now, well, you need to get educated! For one thing, this book has little to do with actual financial information, and (big surprise) Dave often gets off-topic - WAY off topic. But it doesn't matter - there are many funny pieces in here, including Trump-bashing (his hair is the color of 'troll dolls or certain food groups, such as Cheetos'), the top 10 dog thoughts, interviewing tips, investing tips, the whole car-buying process, travel tips (in the helpful Spanish phrases: 'Hey! There's a freakin' WORM in this bottle!'), and many more. If you need a cheering-up, which I did, this is a tonic.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very funny guide that spoofs financial advice!, May 13, 2006
How do you plan to finance your retirement?

1. Savings

2. Social Security

3. Sale of kidneys

You need to be honest in your answer. If you lie, you'll only

be lying to yourself. And, according to advice given

in DAVE BARRY'S MONEY SECRETS (from which this question

was taken), "The place to lie in on your federal tax return."

This is a very funny guide that spoofs much of the personal

financial advice that can be found in other books, TV shows

and online . . . save your money on them; buy this one

instead . . . you may not get rich if you do, but you will

certainly laugh a lot.

Barry has previously written on such other topics as politics, fitness

and parenting . . . I enjoyed those, but this latest one may well be

his very best--especially because it will make you wonder why

people behave the way they do when it comes to money.

For example, in the above quiz, he states, "That if your answers

are all threes [on all the questions], be advised that we're having

a minor technical problem calculating your score because of

Nigerian red tape. To smooth things out, we need you to send

us an 'advance fee' of $5,000, which you will get back many

times over."

The amazing thing is that many people do just that!

There were many other hilarious tidbits; among them:

* Many children learn about money by starting their own businesses,

the classic example being the sidewalk lemonade stand. This is an

opportunity to teach your child fundamental economic principles.

I'm not suggesting that you encourage your child to have a lemonade

stand; that's WAY too much work. I'm suggesting that you

explain to your child that if he buys lemonade from some other

kid's stand, and then happens to choke on a lemon seed, they you

would be in a position to sue the other kid's parents for thousands

of dollars. That is what I mean by "fundamental economic principles."

* One way to take money is in the form of traveler's checks. The way

these work is, you give a traveler's check company a bunch of money,

and the traveler's check company gives you some checks. You cash

some of these checks on your trip, and when you get home you put

the rest of them in the back of your sock drawer for safekeeping, and then

you forget all about them. Eventually you die, and the traveler's check

company gets to keep the money you paid for the uncashed checks

forever.

And this final one that--while presented in a humorous fashion--makes

much sense at least to me:

*Presidential Election Campaign Fund checkoff box: If you check this

box, $3 of your taxes will be earmarked for a special fund to pay for

presidential campaigns. Notice that the government does not permit

you to earmark money for poor people, or sick people, or national

defense. No, the government permits you to earmark money only

for the purpose of enabling politicians to produce TV commercials

designed to appeal to voters who have the IQ of a Vienna sausage.

To make matters worse, some of this federal campaign money goes

to candidates who have about as much chance of getting elected

president as SpongeBob SquarePants. In 2004, of example, more than

$800,000 of earmarked U.S. taxpayer dollars went to Lyndon LaRouche,

a convicted felon and complete space loon who has been running

for president since 1980, and who has claimed, among other things,

that Walter Mondale was a Soviet agent and Queen Elizabeth II is

a drug dealer. If you check the Presidential Election Campaign Fund box,

it won't affect the amount of tax you owe, but I will lose all respect

for you.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars funny guide, January 31, 2006
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
In this book, Dave Barry discusses finances. First he gives an overview of how the US economy works, then moves onto other topics, such as tips on how to get a job (attach a naked photo of Angelina Jolie to your resume), the drawbacks of HMOs (they cover leeches but not insulin if you're diabetic), how to argue with your spouse about money, starting your own business, how to manage a hedge fund, playing the stock market, cheat on your income taxes, travelling (choose a hotel with cheap toilet paper), and how to plan for your retirement fund.

Sprinkled with humorous charts, pictures and photos of Suze Orman and Donald Trump (at whom Barry takes many cheap shots but winds up dedicating the book to them), this book is a must-read for Barry fans.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a serious investment book?, July 13, 2006
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I can't believe some reviewers seem to have taken this book as a serious investment guide. (Look at most of the 1 star reviews here.) After all, this is Dave Barry, truly the funniest man alive in America. Dave makes it abundantly clear, with loads of laugh out humor on every page, as with all of his books (except one, to my knowledge: Tricky business) and newspaper columns, that he is taking nothing seriously, including himself, you and me.

Of course, as with all great humor, there is a good deal of truth behind much of it.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny funny funny, April 1, 2006
By 
Dave Barry discusses all sorts of random financial concerns, from why people stopped using cattle as a valuable medium of exchange (because air-backed paper makes much more sense), the reasons multimillion dollar companies are suddenly bankrupted, why those in charge of those multimillion dollar companies really can't be expected to know what's going on in them, and the financial benefits of convincing your child to be a sloth instead of, say, a Harvard student.

Quote: "Over the years, all the governments in the world, having discovered that gold is, like, rare, decided that it would be more convenient to back their money with something that is easier to come by, namely: nothing . . . for all you know, Fort Knox is filled with Cheez Whiz."

I am not a fan of Dave Barry, I really have no knowledge of Dave Barry (sorry!) so I picked up this book with no idea what it was going to be like except that 1) it was about money and 2) it was probably comedic, judging from the cover. Well, I found it to be completely hysterical- laughing out loud, rolling on the floor, and fairly relevant to real life (such as, what AM I going to do with the thousands of pennies that have been collecting in that jar since the dawn of time in the hopes that they would one day pay for a trip to Disney World). The ratio of funny to actually true was not exactly what I was expected (there was so little that was actually true that when I stumbled across something I BELIEVED to be true, it immediately forced me to reconsider whether I actually knew it to be true at all), but that's not the point. The point is, if you want to read a book actually about economics that is also vaguely entertaining, read Freakonomics. If you just want a good laugh, the occasional picture of Donald Trump, and the frequent reference to Angelina Jolie (occasionally naked), stick with Money Secrets.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A laugh on EVERY page!, August 16, 2006
I laughed on literally EVERY page of the first half of this book! Then I laughed at something on about every other page . . . This book is a hilarious parody of financial advice from books, shows, and 'experts.' Somehow, Dave Barry brings Coca-Cola executives, a man getting a very sensitive part blown off by fireworks, and The Louisiana Purchase into educating his readers about finances.

Photographs of Donald Trump, Suze Orman, Prince Charles, Alan Greenspan and Punxsutawney Phil add to chapters with titles like "Providing for Medical Care; You'll Need Some Leeches," and "How to Argue With Your Spouse About Money; The Nuclear Option; Tampons."

This gift is a great gift for someone who knows nothing about finances, or knows everything but chooses to follow none of the "professional" advice, and it's perfect for those people who know and FOLLOW all of "the rules" about finances.

ENJOY!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny! (You Were Expecting an Economics Treatise?), February 2, 2006
Another funny book by Dave Barry, this time tackling the sometimes not so funny topic of money. Barry begins by providing the reader with a quick "Financial Health Assessment" (five questions), moves on to "How the U.S. Economy Works" (includes a brief history of money), getting rich in the stock market, using real estate as an investment, etc., etc., and finally ending up with a chapter aptly titled "Conclusion," complete with guarantee (though I'm not certain of what - it's not one of those "money-back" ones). In between are chapters with lots of advice on travel, cheating on taxes, arguing about money with your spouse, starting your own business, and providing for medical care (start by getting your own leeches).

Funny, for certain, but best consumed in small doses so that the effect does not wear off.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars BUY IT, ALREADY!, January 30, 2006
By 
C. Norris (Mesquite, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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If you're a Dave Barry fan, as I am, you NEED this book!

Yes, some of the ground has already been covered in Mr. Barry's previous books(I should know!), but this one is still consistently hilarious, and well worth a read. I LOVED the section on buying a new car, and the idea of a "tech support" center for 50-somethings staffed by 50-somethings is nothing short of brilliant.It doesn't sound like it would fit in to a book about money, but it does.

One warning: If you actually *like* either Suze Orman or Donald Trump,better skip this book.

For Dave Barry fans, though, it's priceless!
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Dave Barry's Money Secrets: Like: Why Is There a Giant Eyeball on the Dollar?
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