David Ackles

September 8, 2009 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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5:16
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3:20
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2:59
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4:37
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2:14
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3:57
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1:36
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2:50
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6:11
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4:48
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 24, 2005
  • Release Date: September 8, 2009
  • Label: Rhino/Elektra
  • Copyright: 2005 Warner Strategic Marketing
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 37:48
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00124HR7C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #234,154 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By "mordewis" on March 16, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is the first of David Ackles' four albums, and arguably the best. The songs capture you, drag you in, hold you at knifepoint, and then, breathlessly, let you go. The Road to Cairo... Sunny, Come Home... Blue Ribbons (written for a very young Cher, who never recorded it, about the Watts riots)... even the tender songs will have you clutching your heart. If you're a music lover who doesn't care that the music isn't MARKETABLE, this album will be the centerpiece of your collection. If you're a songwriter, poring over these contents will either make you a better songwriter or leave you wishing you were and knowing you'll never make it.
After you've immersed yourself here and are wanting more, pick up David's 3rd album ("American Gothic", produced by Bernie Taupin) and drink deeply. Then you'll want to finish your collection; the 2nd album, "Subway to the Country", is available, although I find that less satisfying; and have fun finding the vinyl of the 4th Album, "David T. Ackles' Five and Dime", which Columbia has yet to release to CD.
I am very thankful for finding this in vinyl for 50c at a Salvation Army Thrift Store in Denver in the 70s. (This album was also re-released on vinyl as "The Road to Cairo".) All of David's music has meant a lot to me. His death in 1999 was a blow to many of us.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ben Koerner on December 15, 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Finally, this greatest of American albums gets a conscientious CD release.

Long time fans of David Ackles will go straight to the previously unreleased songs. The ineffably poignant "Old Shoes" is, to me, the most astonishing of them. "Grave of God" gives way to melodrama but is, like everything in this man's canon, irresistible anyway. The solo piano version of "Down River" ends with David hammering out the chords in ever darkening blocks, with an intensity evocative of unrestrained grief.

Two of the other three 'extras' were issued on 45s: a French version of "The Road to Cairo" which is retitled "La Route a Chicago" (though he still sings 'Cairo' throughout), and a wonderful, shorter take of "Be My Friend", with strings.

Though it's not stated anywhere, the music has clearly been carefully remastered. It sounds much sharper and clearer, seems to have more air to breathe and suffers no loss of subtlety or detail. Where CDs once sounded abrasive beside the vinyl originals, reissues like this make a strong case for the argument that they now sound far better.

The digipack format is fine, though the original LP contained the lyrics in its gatefold sleeve. Here, we have only an essay by Richie Unterberger, though it's well researched and well written.

So they've done pretty well with this. We can only hope it will be followed by "Subway to the Country" and "American Gothic". This man was beyond question the greatest musician of his generation and the future will recognize him, as we failed to do when he was making these astonishing records.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Andrew P. Benner on July 16, 2006
Format: Audio CD
I would call this one of those mature debuts. Even though he would reach greater heights in later recordings, the blueprint was laid down here. The Brecht/Weill drunken carnival music alternating with quiet piano songs creates a fascinating atmosphere of unease, grotesques & quiet reflection. Like some of the Syd Barrett albums where the instruments were added after the singer was finished recording vocals, the notes often chase the rhythym like a flock of birds, not quite arriving at the same time. But, it doesn't seem to matter much. The songs are that good. I think the songs most often cited by critics are the strongest, "Down River", "The Road to Cairo" & "His Name is Andrew". But, I think all the songs are good.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R. J MOSS on August 19, 2004
Format: Audio CD
By the standards of any time during the last forty years, David Ackle's writing would stand pretty much alone. Laughing Lenny Cohen, in some ways, charts similar territory to Ackles. But the zones he sets his lyrics to must have seemed really perverse in the late sixties & early seventies when, as another reviewer astutely remarks, the nearest gifted equivalent was Jimmy Webb. Webb's star was on the rise though (through interpreters of his songs to be sure,pre-eminently Glen Campbell, as his own albumns received much the same end as Ackles). This is the disc I've most often returned to though. 'Down River', Road to Cairo, & the awesome,'His Name Is Andrew'. Hardly a rollicking affair & none of it bouncing back into mind like the Webb catalogue with the perfume of the bouyant side of the 60s. Ackles was tuned to the darker undercurrent. For subtle nuance of lyric to piano, and range of feeeling in the darker, and tender zones of relationship, I feel he hasn't a rival. Comparisons, I note in other reviews, with Laughing Lenny Cohen do injustice to Ackles, who is far less cumbersome.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By lowell duluth on May 14, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This must be one of the most haunting debut albums of all. There are some songs by this dignified, rough-edged romantic which are so heartbreakingly moving that words fail - eg. Love`s Enough (if only Sinatra had heard that instead of My Way) and Waiting For the Moving Van, both from a later collection and, from this album, the peerless Down River. If I`d ever been able to see a dream concert featuring Ackles, Tom Rush & Tim Hardin - well, I would have died of pleasure. (Look after yourself now, Tom.)
Four-and-a-half stars, mate? Huh!
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