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David Copperfield [Kindle Edition]

Charles Dickens
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (565 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $6.95
Kindle Price: $0.00
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Book Description

This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Beginning in 1854 up through to his death in 1870, Charles Dickens abridged and adapted many of his more popular works and performed them as staged readings. This version, each page illustrated with lovely watercolor paintings, is a beautiful example of one of these adaptations.

Because it is quite seriously abridged, the story concentrates primarily on the extended family of Mr. Peggotty: his orphaned nephew, Ham; his adopted niece, Little Emily; and Mrs. Gummidge, self-described as "a lone lorn creetur and everythink went contrairy with her." When Little Emily runs away with Copperfield's former schoolmate, leaving Mr. Peggotty completely brokenhearted, the whole family is thrown into turmoil. But Dickens weaves some comic relief throughout the story with the introduction of Mr. and Mrs. Micawber, and David's love for his pretty, silly "child-wife," Dora. Dark nights, mysterious locations, and the final destructive storm provide classic Dickensian drama. Although this is not David Copperfield in its entirety, it is a great introduction to the world and the language of Charles Dickens.

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up-Dickens' novel narrated by Flo Gibson.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1239 KB
  • Print Length: 1108 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0141031751
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Public Domain Books (December 16, 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004GHNIQQ
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #774 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
227 of 231 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why it still matters September 24, 2006
Format:Paperback
Somehow, I'd graduated from college - with a degree in English, no less - and had never had to read a single thing ever written by Charles Dickens. I read quite a bit on my own, but still found David Copperfield to be the height of ambition - my copy was 1001 pages long, and I hadn't ventured into a book over a thousand pages since I'd read The Stand at age 12. I cannot imagine that I am alone in completing my education and sidestepping Dickens altogether, so I think it's important I share my experience. In truth, the only reason I chose David Copperfield over, say, Great Expectations or Hard Times was the passing comment made by Jeff Daniels in The Squid And The Whale - dismissing a Tale of Two Cities as "minor Dickens," saying David Copperfield was "much richer."

It is rich. I tend towards modern fiction nowadays, fiction that, unexpectedly, takes you deep inside the heart of its characters sometimes bewildering behavior and humanity. What strikes me about the complex nature of the characters in Copperfield is the way it seems that no effort at all has been used to distinguish each of them, yet there is no doubt as to how vivid they are. Each character speaks in a tone that is a perfect elucidation of who they are - you can hear, just in the dialogue, the calm wisdom of Agnes, the parasitic obsequiousness of Uriah Heep, the punctilious rambling of Micawber, the pleasantries that barely mask the aggression of Miss Dartle, the rigid boredom of the Murdstones, the spoiled impishness when Dora speaks (so precise I heard her voice in cloying and nasal babytalk in my head). It's a delicate balancing act to keep this level of detail so hidden in his work, and it makes the plot machinations speedy and exciting.
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95 of 97 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Consummate Dickens October 30, 2003
Format:Paperback
David Copperfield uses the story of Copperfield's life from birth through middle life to introduce and explore some wonderful personalities. Look more for deep and penetrating character studies than a fast moving plot line. It is not character study alone, however. Again and again, through many characters and many instances, he seems to really explore "the first mistaken impulse of an undisciplined heart", and that "there can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose". Look for these themes to come in from the very beginning and continue until they are actually spelled out by one character and contemplated by another.
When David is born, his father is already buried in the churchyard nearby. He, his mother, and their servant Pegotty live happily enough as a family until his mother remarries. The new husband does not like frivolity or friendly association with servants but more than that, he does not like David. David is sent off to boarding school and then sent out to work. Barred from his mother's affections by his stepfather, Pegotty becomes a full mother figure and his ties to her and her family only deepen with time. Through her, he meets her brother, Mr. Pegotty; her nephew?, Ham, the widow Mrs. Gummidge and Mr. Pegotty's niece, Emily. At school, he makes fast friends with many boys but most especially with the privileged James Steerforth and the not so privileged Tommy Traddles, both of whom show up again in David's adulthood. In the bottling warehouse where he is sent to work as a child, he lodges with Mr. And Mrs. Micawber who are always in debt. They also show up again in his adulthood.
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41 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The theme of David Copperfield September 25, 2005
Format:Paperback
This is a first-person life-story of David Copperfield ("DC") that draws large on Dickens ("CD") own life. It was his "favorite child" and hailed as his best work by Tolstoy and Virginia Woolf. It includes a cast of over 50 characters. For its time it was one of the greatest works, and still is.

To enjoy Dickens you have to let go, sit back, and enjoy the ride and not worry about the destination. Because although you can see the destination early on, like a mountain far off in the distance, the road to get there is entirely unpredictable and the distances traveled are deceiving to the minds eye. The trick is to enjoy the here and now, wherever the story happens to be, because Dickens will never follow the predictable path, and can leave one exasperated waiting for a plot closure. Consider a Dickens journey never-ending and you can just relax and enjoy the ride.

The primary theme of the novel is how Copperfield learns to have a disciplined heart and morals. In other words, he grows up and becomes a man. This is seen throughout all the relationships in the book: love, business, friendship -- the mistakes of an "undisciplined heart". He learns self control to do the right thing even if his initial impulse is something else (Dora versus Agnus). He learns confidence in his dealings with the world (his innocent days of being ripped off all the time such as by waiters and cab drivers "my first fall"). He learns respect through the mistakes of others such as Steerforth. Self control, Confidence and Respect are all hallmarks of a grown man and we see Copperfield develop a sense of these, and the misfortunes that happen otherwise, to himself and those around him.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful story
I may have read this many years ago but I know I didn't appreciate it. TO read it again at age 71 has been a wonderful experience. Who can ever forget such wonderful characters? Read more
Published 2 days ago by daisygirl
5.0 out of 5 stars Dickens Masterpeice
Even though you have the typical Charles Dickens jargon, if you can get past that, this story is brilliant. Read more
Published 3 days ago by Jean Hobson
5.0 out of 5 stars A book so loved there is an Ohio town named after one of the...
One of Dickens classics that since was available free, I had decided I should try reading it. I knew of the book because of Brad on Home Improvement thinking it was written about... Read more
Published 5 days ago by TBreakiron
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book. I can understand why Dickens considered it ...
Great book. I can understand why Dickens considered it his best work. I'd give it 5 stars except that there are odd places where it's obvious that a sentence or two (or more, who... Read more
Published 5 days ago by barcelonamum
5.0 out of 5 stars I LOVE THIS BOOK
I LOVE THIS BOOK. now i will talk about the main characters of the novel- David Copperfield. Whether he shall turn out to be the hero of his life, or whether that station will be... Read more
Published 6 days ago by taon
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
his books are great and timeless
Published 7 days ago by glossy86
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic that is a great read
Well written and though long tells a realistic and impelling story.
All should read. London Dover and Canterbury in earlier years
Published 7 days ago by Dantechy
5.0 out of 5 stars Author with deep insight in human psychology.
My professor at St. Xavier's college, Bombay, suggested to read Charles Dickens to improve my knowledge of English language and how to express m thoughts. Read more
Published 8 days ago by Rasiklal Vora
4.0 out of 5 stars but I loved this book
I don't know if I would say this was illustrated, or maybe my definition is different than the publisher's definition, but I loved this book. Read more
Published 9 days ago by Irishpotato
5.0 out of 5 stars Finally!!!
Can't believe I hadn't read this book before! Finally read it & really enjoyed it. So glad I took the time.
Published 12 days ago by fred
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Dickens not paid by the word
Hmm ... indeed. Unlike the modern author who may or may not land at least a low-budget movie-deal... I feel like Dickens is meant for the reader who actually enjoys reading. If you are looking for instant gratification written at an elementary reading level- Dickens clearly isn't for you.Modern... Read More
Sep 27, 2012 by History Lover |  See all 2 posts
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