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A Day in the Life: One Family, the Beautiful People, and the End of the '60s


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 030681868X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0306818684
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Nothing interesting really happens.
D
Very good book to read on your spare time, I truly enjoyed every part of it, it kept me reading more and more.
kBr
The five stars is for the book which was both fascinating and painfully tragic at the same time.
K. Hopkins

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By sb-lynn TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 19, 2009
Format: Hardcover
No spoilers.

I got this book because I had read an interview with actor Jake Weber, where he talked about his turbulent upbringing during the 1960s. He was one of two sons of a young socialite named "Puss" Susan Coriat, and her husband, Tommy Weber.

I started reading the book, and I ended up finishing it in one sitting. Robert Greenfield really manages to tell a compelling and interesting story, yet still maintain a journalistic distance.

Both Puss Coriat, and Tommy Weber came from privileged, wealthy families. Yet both sets of parents divorced, and Puss and Tommy were shuttled around to various schools and relatives. Puss Coriat's mother Pricilla was well-known - she was known as the "little rich girl" and was one of the wealthiest women of her time, yet she was foolish and a spendthrift. Tommy's parents were likewise pretty dysfunctional.

Puss and Tommy meet and fall in love and marry right at the start of the craziness that marked the mid-to late 1960s. They were right in the center of it all, and they hung around with all the celebrity rockers of their time, in particular the Rolling Stones and Keith Richards. Throw in to this mix a lot of various drugs, (LSD, marijuana, heroin, among others) and you can kind of see where this is going.

I don't want to give anything away, but there is not a good ending for either parent, in particular, Puss. She develops a sort of drug induced schizophrenia, and had an apparent psychotic break along with depression. (Her reaction reminded me a lot of Sid Barret's from Pink Floyd, and in fact he is even mentioned in this regard.) Tommy's life continues with the focus on drugs, sex and rock 'n roll, which doesn't serve him well as he ages.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jerry Pompili on May 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
What an amazing story! A Fairy Tale but one that doesn't end with "they lived happily ever after". Greenfield reveals a part of the swinging 60's that ads to the saying "sex drugs and rock'n roll", heartbreak and despair. I was totally engrossed in this story and could not put it down. WHen is the movie coming out?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on September 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover
A DAY IN THE LIFE: ONE FAMILY, THE BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE, AND THE END OF THE SIXTIES tells how an ideal marriage between two members of the English upper class fell part as the psychedelic dreams of the 50s became the hard-rock of the 80s. Using Tommy Weber and Susan Coriat as an example, the 60s and sentiments come to life in a solid true-life story of social change at its fastest pace.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Evelyn Reinthaler on September 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I found this book to be interesting at times but I couldn't quite get why I should care. Yes it was the swinging sixties and there was a lot going on. I guess the major question is why this particular family? Why did Robert Greenfield choose this family to write a book on? Puss and Tommy were somewhat remarkable but not enough to base a entire book on. Also, i got a little lost when he was went into the details of Puss's journey to Morocco, India, and wherever else she went and Tommy's excursion to Afghanistan to smuggle back a bunch of opium. I didn't really care about Tommy's hijinks or what he did to make money. Basically, I found the book to be insignificant and somewhat boring. I managed to finish it but I kept falling asleep while trying to read it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jeaninne M. Kato on June 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Wonderfully written account of a family that gets caught in the crossfire of the 60's counterculture revolution, which included all the sex, drugs and rock n roll possible. Enjoyed learning about the personal histories that led up to this trainwreck of a family. Even more intriquing is that we know the offspring as actors in the public eye. A real page-turner.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. M. Scheben on February 10, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
First off, this book was great. Robert Greenfield was not only THERE himself but manages to give you a perfect insight into the self-absorbed 'swinging 60's" generation and then some. I recommend it to everyone who is even remotely interested in the topic.

Here is the disclaimer!!!! I bought The Kindle version and to my dismay i discovered that it doesn't come with any pictures. I don't know if this is amazons fault or the publisher or what but one thing i always enjoy about biographies and books of this nature are the photographs, kind of like a cross reference. So the book tells you how beautiful they all were but there are no pictures to see for yourself. Then i went on the internet and you can find maybe 4 or 5 pics but nothing like what the printed edition of these books usually have.

I would give it just ONE STAR for that reason but i liked the actual book a lot so 4 stars it is!
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Tim W. on May 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book because Robert Greenfield is a respected writer. The topic of 60's 'Swinging London' is of interest. The book is only 280 pages. It is basically about rich English youth in the 60's that get too into drugs, get to hang-out with the Rolling Stones a little bit and indulge themselves. Their big mistake was they had two little boys, who obviously, and rightly, now trash their self-absorbed irresponsible parents for their unstable chilhood. I am also a baby boomer, like the characters in the book. Without a doubt the most selfish generation in the history of the world. This book is not bad, but really should have been a magazine article as only the last 100 pages were worth reading.
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