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116 of 133 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent but not for the uninitiated
Most books about Pearl Harbor, from the many volumes of the Congressional Pearl Harbor Hearings to the two-volume study by the late Gordon Prange detail all kinds of intelligence available to the United States that forewarned of the Japanese attack. If you have some background in that history, Stinnett's well-documented book adds new material to the story and...
Published on January 21, 2000 by Amazon Customer

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85 of 100 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some Documents Still Not Declassified
I served with the US Army Special Security Group (USASSG) during the period 1984 to 1987 and worked on a "declassification review" of pre-World War Two and World War Two "Special Intelligence" documents. We safeguarded several thousand linear feet of files inside a vault at Arlington Hall Station, VA. There were hundreds of linear feet of Signals...
Published on December 8, 2000 by Dave Mann


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116 of 133 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent but not for the uninitiated, January 21, 2000
By 
Most books about Pearl Harbor, from the many volumes of the Congressional Pearl Harbor Hearings to the two-volume study by the late Gordon Prange detail all kinds of intelligence available to the United States that forewarned of the Japanese attack. If you have some background in that history, Stinnett's well-documented book adds new material to the story and discloses a set of Japanese Navy communications intercepts that complement more publicized decoded exchanges among the Japanses diplomatic corps.
The notion that high minded government leaders might conspire to manipulate American public opinion in support of a cause they think important and worth American lives is not as evocative in the post-Vietnam politics than it would have been in 1941.
Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson both managed to entice "enemy" attacks on U.S. forces to rally American public opinion Congressional support. They aren't alone. While damage to the U.S. fleet and personnel at Pearl Harbor far exceeded the couple of bullet holes inflicted on the USS Turner Joy and Maddox in the Tonkin Gulf in 1964, the pre-event manipulation was not all that different. That people in government might conspire to keep their machinations hidden from the press and public, sadly, isn't novel either anymore. Radiation experiments, commandos known to be captured, but written off as killed and all the rest have taught us almost too much about human nature.
While Stinnett writes bitterly about the impact on lives and careers of competent officers and men caught up in concealing vital intelligence information from Hawaiian-based officers and subsequently threatened and besmirched to maintain secrecy long after the event, even now, when records are still held secret by the DOD in some bizarre interpretation of protecting the National Defense. At the same time, however, Sinnett and any person with a memory and conscience is hard put to accept the possible outcome of world events in the 1940s had the United States stayed outof the European War.
If this is your first Pearl Harbor book you may get lost in the detail and obscurity needed to substantiate the book's argument. Read something else first, but read this one too.
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75 of 86 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compelling evidence and very few flaws, June 11, 2001
By 
Maginot "It Just Doesn't Matter" (San Francisco, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Day Of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor (Paperback)
"Day of Deceit" provides compelling evidence that President Franklin Delano Roosevelt deliberately provoked Japan to attack the American Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor so that America could enter the war on the allied side. Stinnett, a distinguished World War II navy veteran who researched his subject for over sixteen years, provides the following evidence:
1. A naval intelligence officer named Arthur McCollum developed an eight-point plan to provoke Japanese hostilities. This plan reached Roosevelt who implemented all eight points.
2. Contrary to popular belief, the Japanese navy broke radio silence on multiple occasions prior to December 7, 1941.
3. More than 94% of all secret Japanese naval messages (including some with direct reference to the impending attack on Pearl Harbor) were successfully decoded by American intelligence units prior to December 7, 1941
4. Roosevelt implemented a change of naval command that placed proponents of the eight-point-provocation plan in key positions of power. However, the newly promoted commander of Pearl Harbor, Admiral Husband Kimmel was consistently denied access to vital decoded translations of Japanese naval communications.
5. Naval Intelligence and the FBI successfully monitored the communication of Japanese intelligence agents in Hawaii for months. These communications, which included a bombing grid map of Pearl Harbor, revealed Japan's intent.
6. Much of the information successfully collected and analyzed by American Intelligence organizations prior to December 7, 1941 was reinforced by information from British and Dutch intelligence.
7. A sophisticated radio tracking system spanning from Alaska to Indonesia enabled America to track Japanese commercial and military shipping patterns. These patterns, including the movement of carrier groups and recall of worldwide merchant ships pointed to an obvious prelude to hostilities several months before December 7th.
8. Most of the critical U.S. Pacific Fleet components such as heavy cruisers and aircraft carriers were not in Pearl Harbor during the bombing. In fact the only ships that were sunk were WW I relics.
9. Much of the documented information was censored or withheld from the public for decades and continues to be to this day.
10. In early 1941 Roosevelt divided the U.S. Navy into an Atlantic and Pacific command and ordered fleet construction, which included one hundred aircraft carriers to be completed by 1943. This indicates that the losses at Pearl Harbor would not interfere with America's larger war aims and with war production that supported those aims.
These facts are well documented and reinforced with repeated examples. Perhaps the most compelling part of the book is that photocopies of evidence including the eight-point plan are provided in a massive appendix. Simply put, you can see the evidence for yourself.
Interestingly enough, Stinnett never condemns Roosevelt or his cohorts and even agrees to some extent with their rationale that sacrificing a few men and ships at Pearl Harbor was ultimately worth preventing a complete Axis victory in World War II.
This is perhaps the only part of the book that I have an issue with. Stinnett agrees with McCollum's (and Roosevelt's) assessment that if Germany defeated England, then it would gain control or influence English colonies and nations such as Canada. McCollum believed that Germany's next move would be to occupy parts of South American and to start anti-American uprisings there--and Stinnett agrees with him. What McCollum and Roosevelt could not know at the time, but which a competent historian like Stinnett should know is that ultimately Hitler's war aims consistently followed the goals he had outlined in Mein Kampf. In other words, the defeat of England would likely have been followed by an invasion of Russia instead of an occupation of South America. And in this case, it is quite likely that Japan, having already lost two major border skirmishes with the Soviet Union, might have joined the Nazis in invading the Russian landmass from the East.
This judgment aside, Stinnett's work is compelling to the point of being nearly irrefutable. As to whether or not Roosevelt did the right thing in sacrificing men and material at Pearl Harbor for larger political reasons, that is something each of us must decide on our own.
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91 of 107 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WE'VE BEEN DUPED!, May 2, 2000
I've read the reviews of others, and I have to admit that I'm puzzled by some of them. But, if it weren't for differences of opinion, we wouldn't have horse races, would we?
I think this book is dynamite!
It occurs to me that a possible dividing line of opinion might depend upon who was around, and who wasn't around back on December 7, 1941. Those of us who WERE around, are the people who were really duped by FDR. Those who were NOT around, might tend to take a somewhat nonchalant view of the information revealed in this book.
The information that's revealed is startling, pure and simple. And, the fact that much more information about the Pearl Harbor attack is STILL kept under lock and key by the US Government, is cause for alarm. It's 60 years since these events unfolded. Why is germaine material still being withheld from public scrutiny?
Robert B. Stinnett is to be commended for his excellent detective work and perserverance in discovering and disclosing the contents of this book. (I've ordered three copies, so far.)
It should be REQUIRED reading in all US classrooms!
Carl B. Jordan - former Air Force fighter pilot.
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85 of 100 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Some Documents Still Not Declassified, December 8, 2000
By 
Dave Mann (Brentwood, TN USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Day Of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor (Paperback)
I served with the US Army Special Security Group (USASSG) during the period 1984 to 1987 and worked on a "declassification review" of pre-World War Two and World War Two "Special Intelligence" documents. We safeguarded several thousand linear feet of files inside a vault at Arlington Hall Station, VA. There were hundreds of linear feet of Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) documents pertaining to Pearl Harbor. I admit that I was so dulled by the continuous adrenal rush of reading yet another document revealing some 50-year old historical snippet that I really did not attempt to think about the importance of what I read. After reading this book and comparing it to my memory I sat shocked at the accuracy of the author's research. It is no longer hard to believe in the perfidy of America's politicians after 8 years of The Arkansas Mafia and the Clintons; this book will make it very clear that the politicians of the 1930's and 1940's were every bit as bad as we can imagine. Buy this book and read it now.
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33 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More Truth than Some People Want to Know?, August 10, 2000
Robert B. Stinnett served in the Navy during World War II, then worked for three decades as a photographer for an Oakland CA newspaper (navy base there). Around 1986 he began his research into the events preceding Pearl Harbor.
Searching through piles of documents, he found a paper written in 1940 by a Lt.Commander (later Admiral). This listed the things that had to be done to provoke a war with Japan. For example: "station the fleet at Pearl Harbor", "declare the North Pacific an open, unpatrolled sea", etc. After the actions listed were done, Pearl Harbor was attacked and we were in the war. Does anybody believe that we could have stayed out?
Some now claim that this was not guaranteed. But the Govt. knew things, particularly that declaring war with Japan would bring in Germany and Italy. They were not fooled by the trick where the radiomen from warships were kept in port so their "fist" would be recognized. Radios then were built with discrete parts (tubes, condensor, resistors) whose minute differences were analyzed with an oscilloscope! They knew something was up.
The objection of some people seems to be that it "wasn't proved", as if they expect a videotaped confession. They can read other books on the subject of breaking the Japanese codes. Note that the carrier fleet was kept out of Pearl Harbor, but the old (coal burning?) warships were lined up as they were at Otranto.
Curt Gentry's "J. Edgar Hoover, the Man and the Myth" told how in July 1941 British Intelligence (Ian Fleming and Dusko Popov) knew of plans for attacking Pearl Harbor. So somebody knew.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Valuable, Courageous Research with stunning honesty., November 25, 2000
As a teenager, I was shocked by the sudden, surprise of World War II. For me and many others, the many Whys? and unanswered questions, about the war with Japan, waited for a half century until this author carefully dug out precise evidence that discloses how, why, and when Americans were pushed into that war.
The econommic and political maneuvers that President FDR planned and executed, to force Japan into war, left me with a distrust for the agendas and policies of American political leaders hereafter. We need to demand the truth instead of accepting what we are told by political leaders.
The book is thoroughly documented and explained. Its story is told in words that anyone can understand, but the reader needs to read it to the end to digest its story.
Mr. Stinnett's book will remain as a landmark breakthrough, regarding World War II and the Pearl Harbor disaster. The courage of the author and those he interviewed are a light in the tunnel.
It brings to mind other deceptions, approved by U.S. presidents of recent times, such as American assassination plots on foreign leaders - Lumumba, Allende, Diem, Castro, etc. and two recent wars - Vietnam started by the LBJ's fake claim of a Tonkin Gulf attack - and Bush's Gulf War on Iraq, when U.S. diplomat, April Glaspie assured Saddam Hussein that the American Gov't had no concern if Iraq reclaimed its Kuwait province, and then threw war on Iraq when Hussein reclaimed Kuwait.
How many hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children have been killed by our presidents' orders? Why is it a surprise that FDR engineered our entry to WWII? What will our new president in this century try to do? This book warns us to watch out, find the truth, and be not fooled by words.
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49 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Real Life Chess Game, January 11, 2000
By 
Daryll Bolinger (Detroit, Michigan) - See all my reviews
The game of chess is a metaphor for real life government. In truth, politics is about control and manipulation. We don't like to accept that because we want to view ourselves as individuals who want to control our own destiny. Life and death is the ultimate destiny and war is a fact in the the world. Mr. Stinnett has shown incredible fortitude and perserverance in his research for this book. This book will be considered one of the premier books about WWII in the twentieth century. Those who reject it will be doing so from an uninformed or political viewpoint. Having done research in a related area, Mr. Stinnett has answered some of my research questions. I feel Mr. Stinnett's work will become a recognized reference source. The contents will be a source of never ending controversy that could only be served by an open forum. What justification can there be for continued censorship ? To quote David W. Gaddy, chief historian of the NSA ( National Security Agency ) about NOT releasing information on American cryptographic success with Japanese codes, "It's in the public interest." On censorship : "The subject cannot be debated publicly; the government cannot disclose the basis for its position if the basis is itself part of the secret it must protect as part of its obligation to secure the public interest." Quoted from the book "Day of Deceit".
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77 of 95 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hero or Traitor?, January 3, 2000
By 
John F. McKeown (Upstate New York) - See all my reviews
I am not suprised by the negative treatment that this book has received. If the author had treated any other topic, or any other President, the comments would be different. This historian has attacked one very, very, sacred cow.
Some say that this book will only persuade those who are not familiar with the subject. This is untrue. It was endorsed by John Toland, the author of the Infamy, an impressive tome on this very subject.
"Step by step, Stinnett goes through the prelude to war, using new documents to reveal the terrible secrets that have never before been disclosed to the public. It is disturbing that eleven presidents, including those I admired, kept the truth from the public until Stinnett's Freedom of Information Act requests finally persuaded the Navy to release the evidence."
I personally doubt that FDR imagined that the losses would be so severe. Battleships were presumed to be tough, harbors protected, and Pearl did have radar. A battle yes, a massacre,no. To think otherwise contemplates an unimaginable crime.
Some justify FDR on the grounds of the horrors of the enemy. However, this presumes that what did take place - and the Holocaust took place long after Dec. 7, 1941 - was predestined, and in no way influenced by the US entry into the war (and in no way possibly prevented by our neutrality). Remember, the demand for Unconditional Surrender and the Morgenthau Plan also came out of FDR's administration.
There are some who still possess a Little Red Riding Hood view of America's role in the Second World War. This book helps end such childishness.
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69 of 85 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Explosive!, June 30, 2000
By A Customer
Heartily recommended, though following all the notes will make it tough going at times.
Robert Stinnett has written an important book on American preparations leading up to the attack on Pearl Harbor 7 Dec 1941. His massive evidence, though circumstantial in large part, suggests an intentional effort to hamstring Adm Kimmell and Gen Short and then to punish them after the fact.
Nowadays, it's almost beyond dispute that FDR had a secret policy to provoke Japan into war, but with Japan committing the first over act. Adm Kemp Tolley has described his own experience in executing one element of this unacknowledged policy at a tactical level. Mr. Stinnett provides evidence of this policy in Washington (ONI, CNO, and presumably FDR.) This book challenges much conventional wisdom about the attack. For example, the Japanese attack fleet did not maintain radio silence. The U.S. authorities (but not Kimmell and Short) were quite aware of the Japanese navy's spy in the Honolulu consulate. The British probably supplied to Americans decrypted messages warning Japanese commanders of the date and place of attack.
It suggests that Adm Kimmell was ordered not to patrol north of Oahu, and that Gen Short was given misleading orders to focus on sabotage when his superiors in Washington had reason to expect an air raid. It implicates Gen Marshall in the post-war coverup.
One wonders why the federal government continues to withhold documents on this subject nearly sixty years later. It feeds conspiracy theorists.
After the first reading, it was still unclear to me whether Cdr Rochefort deliberately withheld radio intelligence from Adm Kimmell.
One hopes that the author will clean up the many small but annoying typographical errors in this book for readers of the next printing. E.g.: a footnote is missing; another note has a nonsensical equivalence of mph to meters; and misspelled words. These undermine the credibility of this important book.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Surprise Attack: The False Myth, May 17, 2011
By 
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This review is from: Day Of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor (Paperback)
A Surprise Attack: The False Myth

This is an important and revelatory book but I would say it is not for the uninitiated.

Day of Deceit: The Truth about FDR and Pearl Harbor by Robert B. Stinnett is a summation of a lengthy investigation that shows "almost" beyond a doubt that there was foreknowledge of the attacks at Pearl Harbor. Also the book shows that a plan was most certainly in place to encourage and provoke Japan to make the first "overt act of war".

As to the first point about foreknowledge, I say "almost" beyond a doubt because the documents or evidence that would finally put this historical event to rest have been destroyed or are still withheld by the national security state.

What is clear, is that the Truth of the attack on Pearl Harbor has been swamped in the perpetuation of a false myth.
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Day Of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor
Day Of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor by Robert B. Stinnett (Paperback - May 8, 2001)
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