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A Day with Wilbur Robinson Paperback – September 30, 1993


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 580L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (September 30, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064433390
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064433396
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 10 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,462,565 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Dinosaur Bob fans should rejoice: in his latest work, Joyce pulls out all the stops and introduces the weirdest family since his Lazardo clan. A young narrator, going to see his best friend Wilbur, remarks, "His house is the greatest place to visit." Readers soon see why. Wilbur's large household includes an aunt whose train set is life-sized, an uncle who shares his "deep thoughts" ("Mississippi spelled with o 's . . . would be Mossossoppo !") and a grandfather who trains a dancing frog band. There's not much in the way of formal plot here--save a slight mystery involving Grandfather's missing false teeth--but Joyce's wonderfully strange paintings abound with hilarious, surprising details and leave the impression that a lot has happened. A visit to the Robinsons' is a bit overwhelming (as the narrator says, "I was kind of sad to leave, but I was ready to go home for a while"), but it's a trip children will want to make again and again. Ages 4-8.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

The Robinson's house is not like anyone else's because Wilbur's family is not like any other. The slim plot that involves Wilbur and his visiting friend looking for Grandfather's lost false teeth is just a device to introduce the wonderfully weird family members. Most of the jokes are only in the pictures, while the restrained, slightly tongue-in-cheek text provides a satisfying contrast. The text states that Aunt Billie is playing with her train set, Cousin Pete is walking the cats, and Uncle Art has just arrived from abroad, but the trains are shown as full sized, the cats are tigers, and Uncle Art is stepping out of a flying saucer. The illustrative style is reminiscent in both color and form of 1940s advertising art. Many details such as hairstyles, clothing, and even a robot seem influenced by that period. In keeping with the advertising look, the layout is open and spacious. Although the figures often appear frozen in a pose, even when gesticulating, and the two boys are mainly passive observers except in a close-up of a wild pillow fight, the imaginative details and the changing perspectives keep the pictures interesting. Children may not realize that the dancing frogs are watching Fred Astaire movies or that sister has a model of the Empire State building for a headdress--these jokes are for adults--but they will enjoy the imaginative play and delight in filling in the text. --Karen James, Louisville Free Public Library, KY
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

A true luminary and creative spirit, William Joyce has put his personal stamp on children's media in every direction. His picture books include George Shrinks, Dinosaur Bob and Santa Calls; he's won three Emmy awards for his Rolie Polie Olie animated series; developed character concepts for Toy Story and A Bug's Life; and his films include Robots and Meet the Robinsons. He's currently co-directing The Guardians for DREAMWORKS, and is producing The Leaf Men, based on his picturebook. He lives in Shreveport, LA, and is the founder of Moonbot Studios.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
If you like Chewandswallow, you'll love Wilbur Robinson's family. Eclectic 90's techno family unique as the Adams Family and The Jetsons. The wacky way of life at the Robinson's and illustrations appeal to children while the moral of the story and outstanding imagination and wit appeals to the adults.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
A book for young and old, laced with fantasy and whimsical delight. What other children's books have brain enhancers, dancing frogs, spaceships, and a rousing chorus of "Yes, We Have No Bananas?" Wilbur Robinson and his family are the coolest.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kevin M. Hadley on March 26, 2003
Format: School & Library Binding
I first got this book from thr library to read to my children but I purchased it for myself. It is that entertaining. It has an inventive story line based on a visit with an average but somewhat unusual family. The illistrations are high quality, full of surprises, and reminicent of the Art-Deco world and Buc Rogers. Pictures and text each support one another and provide a new discovery with each read.
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A Kid's Review on April 19, 2007
Format: Paperback
Wow! The book A Day with Wilbur Robinson is a fantastic book. The book is about a boy who visits Wilbur Robinson and his family in the future. I loved this book because it was funny when Wilbur and his friend are looking for his grandpa's teeth. In the end grandpa's teeth are found in a funny way. If you read the book you will know where they find his teeth. I recommend this book to anyone of any age because it is a good book and every age group will like it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's a fun book, though more for the lower half of the suggested age 4-8 range. Ultimately part of the inspiration for the Meet the Robinsons movie, we spend time with a very eccentric family of inventors, scientists, and dilettantes in a Jetsons style retro-futurist wonder-world. My daughters remarked "Wilbur Robinson" when they first saw the "upstairs" segments of Metropolis.
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