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Daylight Atheism Paperback – August 9, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 254 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (August 9, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1478222670
  • ISBN-13: 978-1478222675
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,935,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
58%
4 star
33%
3 star
0%
2 star
8%
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See all 12 customer reviews
Keep the book by your bedside.
Matt S.
If you are one of those folks, this book will show you an alternative based in reality.
Jack Wathey
Every theist needs to read this book.
AlanG100

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Jack Wathey on June 30, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Daylight Atheism shines the bright, disinfecting sunlight of reason onto dark and moldy religious stereotypes about atheists and atheism. It's a pleasure to read Lee's fluid prose as he methodically tears down centuries-old castles of religious obfuscation. But Daylight Atheism is not just another rant about how much religion sucks and why it is mistaken. It is mainly a passionately argued case for atheism -- broadly defined as encompassing a skeptical, empirical and humanist worldview -- as a positive and uplifting way of life. For me this aspect of the book reaches its zenith in chapter 9, Stardust, which is nearly poetical. Another personal favorite for me is chapter 3, All Possible Worlds, which is possibly the most lucid discussion of the Problem of Evil I have ever read. Chapters 2 and 8 attack from opposite directions that most vicious of stereotypes about atheists: that they can have no morality.

Although atheists will love this book, it's clear from the final chapter, Into the Clear Air, that Lee is really trying to reach believers who struggle with doubt. If you are one of those folks, this book will show you an alternative based in reality. You owe it to yourself to read this book.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Reid on July 2, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is an excellent collection of writing on various topics in atheism and religion: How to construct a coherent secular morality, why atheism needn't be nihilistic, why the problem of evil and divine hiddenness make the existence of God unlikely, the dubious morality of the Bible and the dangers of theocracy.

This book appears to be based on many of the online essays previously published on the author's Ebon Musings pages, though obviously expanded for this edition.

I've always admired the clarity of Adam's writing on these topics. He shares Sam Harris' knack for making points effectively without descending into the rabbit-hole of too much philosophical terminology.

To the theist considering reading this book I would offer the following advice: Adam's tone can be quite angry and, while I believe he is justified, I can also appreciate that this might make it more of a struggle to get through the early chapters. Try not to take this personally as there are important points to be made and they are being made here as well as anywhere. Perhaps start with the last Chapter and then go back and read the rest.

Knocking off a star for some technical issues: Though the book has a table of contents, the Kindle doesn't recognise it as such. Also, the footnotes are not hyperlinks, which is very annoying.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Nolan on December 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Daylight Atheism is blogger Adam Lee's unapologetic attempt to promote a view that his readers will be familiar with: "There may or may not exist a being we would call god. . . but so far we have no good reason to believe that there is. Moreover, there are excellent reasons to think that none of the religions human beings have ever believed in are true. . ." (11) It is also Lee's attempt to paint a positive, "daylight" brand of atheism, one that goes further than taking down religious views.

Lee argues for his conclusions in two parts. First, he highlights the morally inexcusable passages of the Bible, the argument from evil and divine hiddenness, and the evils done due directly to theistic beliefs, The second part of the book is Lee's attempt to make a positive case for atheism, with Lee answering common arguments that communism, pessimism, nihilism, amorality, and arrogance, are unavoidable given atheism, or at least common characteristics of atheists. Lee also attempts to show an optimistic atheistic view of controversial subjects like morality and death.

Where Lee shines most is in his concise, readable, and yet focused writing style. He has a talent for distilling complex arguments, like the problem of evil, into short, readable sections that cover multiple rounds of the traditional debates. Academic philosophers could learn a lot from Lee.

Still, Lee falls short in some areas, making claims that appear overly general or unwarranted by the evidence he provides. For example, he claims that religious morality is flawed because it "is not grounded in human needs. . . But obedience to the will of God" (20). On its face, that seems like an unfair blanket statement about religious morality that fails to cover an extensive segment of Eastern religious morals.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Prof.V.N.K.Kumar on July 1, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Many times you read a book of 300 pages and end up with a feeling that the author could have said what he said in less than 30 pages. But Adam's book is not like that. It has the length which it needs. The logic of his arguments is simply superb. He tries to cogently carry the readers with him and never tries to flaunt his erudition on them.

I am an Ex-Management consultant from India, am running 75 and for the past 60 years I am an atheist. Reading this book reinforced some of my earlier convictions and also has given me enough reasons to be proud of my non-theistic leaning.

While all the ten chapters are written beautifully, My favorites were ch.1 on 'Fossil Fuels', ch.5 on 'The cosmic shell Game', Ch.6 on 'Life w/o superstition', & ch.9 on 'Stardust'. I am expecting a sequel to this from this author.
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More About the Author

Adam Lee is an author and blogger living in New York City. In his spare time, he writes about religion, science and humanism on the blog Daylight Atheism on Patheos.