Days of Fire and Glory and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$17.45
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $7.50 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Days of Fire and Glory: T... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Days of Fire and Glory: The Rise and Fall of a Charismatic Community Hardcover – September 8, 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.45
$13.99 $12.85

New from Lisa Carter
Explore Lisa Carter's latest book Vines of Entanglement. Learn more
$17.45 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Days of Fire and Glory: The Rise and Fall of a Charismatic Community + This Is My Story This Is My Song: A Life Journey
Price for both: $33.12

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Crossland Press (September 8, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0979027977
  • ISBN-13: 978-0979027970
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,500,024 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Julia Duin is religion editor for The Washington Times. She worked for newspapers in Oregon, Florida, and New Mexico, and was the religion writer for the Houston Chronicle in Texas when the events in this book occurred. This is her fifth book.

Customer Reviews

This is the main problem with the book.
gwarren
Julia Duin tells the story of the rise and fall of the charismatic experience at the Church of the Redeemer, Episcopal, in Houston.
L. Chopin Cusachs
Julia Duin has written a book I have wanted to read since before she had a thought of writing it, and she has done it very well.
R. E. Sawyer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Derek (True-Small-Caps.Blogspot.Com) on October 27, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I couldn't put this book down! Once I'd started, I read all 300+ pages in less than twenty-four hours.

Graham Pulkingham was an Episcopal priest in Houston, overwhelmed by the problems of serving a decaying neighborhood. He received what he took to be a message from God telling him to go to New York. There, at the hands of David Wilkerson (The Cross and the Switchblade), he received a pentecostal-style baptism in the Spirit. When Pulkingham returned to Houston, he discovered he had the power to bring about miraculous healings. Crutches were left at the altar rail. Incurable diseased were pronounced cured.

Many of his fellow Episcopalians were appalled by the charismatic direction Pulkingham's spirituality had taken. Some questioned his sanity. Long-time members left the parish. But encouraged by prophetic utterances, Graham Pulkingham persisted. He formed a daily 5:30 a.m. prayer group, to which several dozen people committed themselves, despite their full-time jobs. People sold large homes to move to small apartments nearer his newly charismatic church and care for the poor of the neighborhood. Above all, there was praying in tongues.

Pulkingham's church attracted more and more people. The weekday schedule grew to include two morning prayer meetings as well as Bible study and interpretation. They opened a street ministry and a coffee house. The young musicians at the coffee house made successful records. Many churchgoers formed communal households. People from out of town came to visit Redeemer church to see what was going on. CBS made an hour-long documentary about them. Graham Pulkington himself wrote the first of several books. Sunday attendance, which had once been 200 people, grew to 2,000 people. Even a Friday evening service would attract 800.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Evangelical2 on October 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
(Given Oct. 3 at the Anglican District of Virginia conference in Woodbridge, Va.)
"This past week, I read a new book: "Days of Fire and Glory" written by Julia Duin who is known to many of us as the religion reporter for The Washington Times. The book chronicles the rise and fall of the Church of the Redeemer in Houston, Texas, and it is both wonderfully inspiring and terribly painful to read.
"The Church of the Redeemer was one of the flagship churches during the charismatic renewal that swept through the Episcopal Church in the 1960s and '70s. It was an amazing church that grew to a worshipping congregation of 2,000 or more but its impact was much wider.
"Much of our vision for Spirit-filled worship and many of the so-called renewal songs that are still sung today were birthed in that community. Many of us were shaped by the life and teaching of that church. If you read the book, and I hope that many of you will, you will come across many familiar names.
"It is an astonishing story but its spectacular rise was matched by an equally dramatic fall. Today there is very little left of that church. The communities that were at its heart have scattered with many of the participants still wounded by the experience. The leader and visionary rector, Graham Pulkingham, was exposed as a sick and perverted man. He had numerous destructive relationships with some of the most vulnerable members of that church and died an ignominious death in 1993 suffering a heart attack in a supermarket shoot-out.
"It is a tragic story and one whose lessons we dare not ignore. Yes, they were a Spirit-filled church. They did witness many dramatic miracles of healing and many lives were transformed. I know because we were there; we saw it with our own eyes.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 34 people found the following review helpful By R. E. Sawyer on October 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Julia Duin has written a book I have wanted to read since before she had a thought of writing it, and she has done it very well.

For two decades I was a member of the community of which she writes. and for most of that time I have longed to read something from someone near the headwaters of renewal in the Episcopal church. I wanted a book looking backwards over the past 20-30-40 years assessing what we then thought, how things turned out, where we were right, where wrong, what were the mistakes, what were the victories, etc., and most importantly, what does this mean for our understanding of the church, and for it's future; "where do we go from here?"
I longed for someone like the Rev. Graham Pulkingham, or the Rev. Dennis Bennett, or The Rev. Terry Fullam to speak to how we got from 1967 to here, and what will it mean to go forward.

Well, that just isn't gonna happen.
But Julia has done the next best thing, and probably done it better.

In order to tell this story, two things are essential: the writer must be close enough to the events to understand them, and removed enough to see and tell the story objectively. I can think of no one who meets those criteria nearly as well as Julia Duin. The intimacy and reality of her own walk with God, combined with her professional discipline of objective detachment has given her the tools needed both to understand the story of Redeemer, and to tell the truth.

And truth, crystal clear transparency, the ability to both see and say what was really going on, is here revealed as close to the defining need at Redeemer. Interestingly, many things can counterfeit transparency. And desire for the well-being of the community can be a competitor to love of truth.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Days of Fire and Glory: The Rise and Fall of a Charismatic Community
This item: Days of Fire and Glory: The Rise and Fall of a Charismatic Community
Price: $24.95 $17.45
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com