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In the Days of Victorio; Recollections of a Warm Springs Apache Paperback – November 1, 1972


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In the Days of Victorio; Recollections of a Warm Springs Apache + Indeh: An Apache Odyssey, with New Maps + Once They Moved Like The Wind : Cochise, Geronimo, And The Apache Wars
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press; (1st,1970); Second Printing edition (November 1, 1972)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0816504016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816504015
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #457,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Bought this book for my husband who is a history buff.
Charles Davis
Ball also includes footnotes referring the reader to perspectives of various white observers, especially where historical records differ from the Apache side.
Wilderness Guy
The book shows how important family was (and still is) to the Apaches.
Dale C. Miles

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Dale C. Miles on June 25, 2008
Format: Paperback
Dale C. Miles, San Carlos tribal historian

As an Apache I would like to say that I read the review about James Kaywaykla's SELECTIVE ASPECTS on Apache history and culture and was more amused than anything else. Since I've had to deal with non-tribal people for most of my life (I was born on the San Carlos tribal area and have lived in Arizona all my life)I have found that correcting white folks' misconceptions about us Apaches has been nearly a full time job (Example: Do you people pay taxes? I just say: "I wish I didn't have to.") still as an historin I have to be objective and I realize that Apaches in war could be pretty rough. Still, knowing that I still have to deal with prejuidice in nearby towns tells that in the ole' West things were even worse. The point is this, Eve Ball wrote reason for writing the is fine book on Victorio's people was for non-tribal people to see the Apaches as human beings and in this she succeeded very well. An objective reader will see Kaywaykla and his people as such. For instance, you will find that many did not want to live a life of constant warfare and refused to go out with Geronimo in the spring of 1885--they were sent to prison in Florida anyway just because they were Chiricahua and the army couldn't catch the hostile ones. Also in the passage where where his beloved step father is sent to prison one can see the pain, hurt and loss that a child can feel at such an incident. The book shows how important family was (and still is) to the Apaches. In this book Juh (pronounced Whoa), Loco and Geronimo come alive and we see the lengendary Apache woman warrior lozen, is profiled as well. I give this book five stars because as an Apache I understand where the narrantor is coming from; any open minded person would as well.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Ntive on December 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
As an apache woman, this is one book I would highly recommend. Not only does it tell of what The Warm Springs Apache had to endure, but of what they felt and of the internal conflicts amonst the apache people. In this book not only do they focus on Chief Victorio but all that surrounded him.
I recommend all to read this book and see what it was like from the Apache point of veiw.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
Anyone interested in the Apache and the history of the American Southwest needs to read this book. You will likely consider the events and participants of this controversial period of history in a new light when you hear the "other side of the story" from one who was there. I wouldn't be surprised if you measure all other accounts of the "Apache Wars" period against Mr. Kaywaykla's testimony.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Wilderness Guy on May 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ball writes her questions and gives the response of the Apache answerer. In many cases, the answerer was telling their own personal observations because they were actually there, and these were very vivid descriptions of the events that happened. Such details of daily survival are very enlightening, giving insights into Apache beliefs and traditions, as well as their motivations. Most of the recollections are those of Kaywaykla, grandson of Nana, and gives details about Nana, Kaytennae, Geronimo, Juh, Chihuahua, Lozen, and other Apaches, in addition to Victorio. Occasionally Ball includes recollections of other Apaches that supported those of Kaywaykla.

Ball also includes footnotes referring the reader to perspectives of various white observers, especially where historical records differ from the Apache side. My only complaint is where these footnotes contained more than mere book, author, or page references and were included at the back of the book. I wish that the additional verbiage had been included at the bottom of the page so that my reading wasn't disrupted by going to the back of the book to see what the reference was about.
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Format: Paperback
Eve Ball set out to speak with Apache, and record what she was told. The result is some fascinatingly rich books, with irreplaceable wisdom. I read a lot of history of the Apache, and had no idea how much more was not in those books, until I started reading Eve Ball's books. They are really well done.
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