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  • Shadows Over Camelot
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Shadows Over Camelot


List Price: $59.99
Price: $46.79 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: $13.20 (22%)
Only 20 left in stock.
  • A unique collaborative game featuring a malevolent twist
  • Great for game nights
  • Takes 60-90 minutes to play
  • Beware the traitor in the midst
  • Takes 60-90 minutes to pay
26 new from $46.79 1 collectible from $87.78

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Frequently Bought Together

Shadows Over Camelot + Days of Wonder Shadows Over Camelot Merlin's Company Board Game + Pandemic Board Game
Price for all three: $102.32

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 11.8 x 11.8 x 3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • Origin: Made in USA or Imported
  • ASIN: 0975277383
  • Item model number: DOW 7401
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 12 - 16 years
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,672 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
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Product Description

From the Manufacturer

A lone swallow flies across the grey skies of Cornwall. The forces of evil are gathering around Camelot. The Black Knight was sighted atop a desolate ridge; a scheming Morgan plots her revenge; the Saxon troops are on the move; and acres of timber are being felled for the siege engines. And yet Lancelot has all but vanished, with Excalibur yet to be recovered. These are heavy times indeed. Will you, young squire, come forth and pledge allegiance to your fellow Knights of the Round Table' In your heart of pure intent and ready to sacrifice for the good of all' Or will the dark promise of power seduce you into treason' Shadows Over Camelot is a unique collaborative game featuring a malevolent twist. As the incarnation of the Knights of the Round Table, players work together to defeat the forces closing in on Camelot. But beware, players must be vigilant for a traitor in their midst who is biding his time-secretly sowing the seeds of havoc and destruction. Yet too much suspicion will undermine the knight's efforts to protect the kingdom. These are dangerous times indeed. Many memorable game nights await in this Days of Wonder game. The game is for 3 to 7 players and takes about 60-90 minutes to play.

Product Description

A cooperative boardgame with a malevolent twist!By Serge Laget & Bruno CathalaFor 3 - 7 playersJust Restocked!

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

This game is great fun to play with a group of friends.
ScrubKai
Their use of positive and negative player actions, a secret "traitor" character and the constant pressure of ever encroaching enemies is exiciting and challenging.
Wayland J. Myers
In fact, the game gets better the more you play - at first, wrapping your head around all the rules can be a little daunting.
Laura Young

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Wayland J. Myers on July 6, 2005
Most boardgames based on legends and tales seem to quickly lose their fantastical feel as the players are forced into learning complex (or overly simplistic) strategies. And all too often these strategies and modes of play are only loosely aligned with the tale they are based on, thus dropping the player right out of the fantasy and into the "boredgame" syndrome. However, Shadows Over Camelot neither loses its fantastical feel nor disconnects the elements of play from the rich Arthurian history. Its designers should be hailed for their brilliant use of characters with unique strengths, relevant and interesting quests, wonderful artwork and incredible game play balance. Their use of positive and negative player actions, a secret "traitor" character and the constant pressure of ever encroaching enemies is exiciting and challenging. They have successfully captured some of the "funnest" attributes of fantasy gaming, while offering a strategic challenge that had our group clapping and shouting at hard-won victories. It was easy to learn, but will take some time to master - one of the attributes any great game should possess. Our hats (and helms) are off to the Days of Wonder folks. Great stuff!
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32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Paul Breon on November 9, 2006
The game's enjoyment really comes from taking on the personas of the characters - kind of like a mini roleplaying game - and getting into the action that way. You're actually working to beat "the game", and not really competing against each other. That's part of what makes this game so creative.

The best part of the game is that one player can end up as "The Traitor" and actually be working against the other players without their knowledge, advancing the cause of the "Dark Side" in the shadows. There are 'loyalty' cards dealt out at the beginning of the game; all of them say "LOYAL" except for one. We always include ONE more loyalty card than there are players, that way, someone probably is the traitor, but not necessarily.

I remember the first time I was the traitor - it was so exciting! I mean, I was just so into that game, trying to pretend like I was helping, and instead going to a location where I could burn through my good cards without anyone realizing it. Then, when I blew my cover, I made a really bad play, intending to harm the other players, and ended up killing off my character! I just wanted to cry. (Well, not REALLY.) Anyway, this is a great game. Takes about 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours with four people (but that's with 4 kids running around and lots of snack breaks.)

The other thing about this game is that it is just BEAUTIFUL. I mean, every time we open it I just marvel at the level of detail and the beauty of it. (And it smells good, too!) This game is expensive, but when you open the box and play it, you'll know why. It FEELS like a $[...] game; nothing cheap or cheesy about it.
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38 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Peter Ingemi VINE VOICE on August 1, 2005
Days of Wonder strikes again with a game that combines playability,skill, repeat play ability and twists and turns enough keep you guessing till the end.

It is a game easy enough for kids and challenging enough for adults, and it is a fast enough play so that a group can finish it and still play something else. Our gaming group usually has one or two people who show up late due to work (this happens when you game in your 40's) this game is an excellent multi player choice to play while waiting for the latecomers.

The basics are these you play one of the Knights of Camelot and try to complete quests as either teams or as individuals. Each Knight has abilities specific to himself. The different quest vary from the Holy Grail to the recovery of the Sword Excalibur to more mundane quests like defeating Picts or Saxons or solo quests such as defeating the Black Knight.

You can quickly adjust the skill level of the game by playing with our without the traitor rule. With the traitor rule one player is a traitor, but his loyalty is known only to him at the start of the game.

If Days of Wonder keeps putting out quality stuff like this pretty soon I'll be calling the old Avalon Hill "Avalon who?"
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Laura Young on June 13, 2007
Shadows Over Camelot was the game that got me into board games. It's visually arresting, fascinating to play, and the complexities of the game don't get old, even if you play once a week for almost 2 years! In fact, the game gets better the more you play - at first, wrapping your head around all the rules can be a little daunting. But stick with it! More than likely, by the time you finish playing the first or second time, you'll have all the rules and a good deal of strategy down as well.

But let me skip right to the good stuff. Shadows Over Camelot is my favorite game, for one main reason. The Traitor. Not only does the mere idea that one of your knights might not be loyal throw a wrench into the cooperative mechanics of the game, but actually *being* the traitor is... is... so delightfully treacherous!!! You undermine your friends' work. If you have Lancelot's armor, you pretend to wince about your limited choices while playing a black card that may well screw them all over. And so long as you remain unrevealed, it's wonderfully stimulating to try and remain that way. (Last time I was the traitor, my hands were shaking so hard that I was sure both my "fellow players" (read: opponents) knew what I was up to. Also, the amount of King Arthur lore embedded in the game is really fun to discover! For example - the quest for Lancelot's armor turns out horribly when Guinevere appears on the scene, but Merlin may be able to save you...

One last note - once you get the hang of the game, be sure not to give each other too much information!! Our most recent handicap is that we give each other no advice or information about cards other than what we intend to do on our next turn. If someone wants to say more than that, they have to discard a white card or lose a life point, so you can imagine it doesn't happen very often.
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