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101 of 109 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Small-in-Size, Efficient, and Superb Sound Amplifier
I have owned a Dayton Audio DTA-100 (the original version) for a year now and, just two days ago, I received this Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC, the upgraded version.

I am as pleased as is possible with both of them. The sound quality produced by these amplifiers is nothing short of amazing.

Both versions use the Tripath...
Published on June 25, 2011 by Lawrence H. Bulk

versus
47 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent amplifier while it worked
While it worked, Dayton Audio DTA-100a was an excellent medium-power stereo amplifier. It was very neutral and produces a much more detailed and clear sound than my old Sony receiver. An additional benefit is that it is light, hardly takes any space, and accepts world-wide voltage (110-240 Volts). It used to drive a pair of my Mission 772 speakers just fine, even though...
Published on May 14, 2011 by leo


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101 of 109 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Small-in-Size, Efficient, and Superb Sound Amplifier, June 25, 2011
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I have owned a Dayton Audio DTA-100 (the original version) for a year now and, just two days ago, I received this Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC, the upgraded version.

I am as pleased as is possible with both of them. The sound quality produced by these amplifiers is nothing short of amazing.

Both versions use the Tripath TK2050 chipset which offers extremely - and I mean extremely - clean and neutral sound (at its true high fidelity rating of 30 W/Channel) plus very high electrical efficiency (> 85% claimed). It is as 'green' as it comes.

I had written to Parts Express asking them to tell me the difference between the -100 and the -100a; their technician's reply was that the new -100a has an improved headphone amplifier circuit; nothing else has been changed. I wouldn't know about this - I do not often listen to music through headphones and I have never tried using headphones with either of these amplifiers.

Via loudspeakers, the sound produced is the same with both models. And, as stated, it's just great!

I have read where 30 W/channel is "not enough" power. I disagree with that statement; how "loud" music sounds is a function of the sound amplifier power, true to some extent, but it is much MORE a function of the efficiency of the speakers used in conjunction with that amplifier.

Connect a pair of Klipschorns (sensitivity of 105 db/1W/1M - the most efficient speakers ever made - I own a pair) to a 30 W/channel amplifier and that system could "blow you out of the room" (maybe out of your house - maybe even off your block!). If you are interested in this amp, you'll want to check speaker sensitivity prior to purchasing the speakers. A speaker of 88 dB/1W/1M would be more than adequate to be used with this amplifier in any 'normal' room. A speaker of > 92 dB/1W/1M would be perfect for even very large rooms.

According to the manufacturer, this amplifier should NOT be used with 4 Ohm (impedance) speakers; 6 Ohm is the minimum impedance rating acceptable. Fortunately, most speakers today are of 8 Ohm rating and are therefore perfectly acceptable. (Note that impedance varies with frequency but if a manufacturer rates his speakers at 8 Ohms, it is safe to assume that the rating is correct.)

I can tell you that, using this amplifier with the Dayton Audio B652 6-1/2 2-Way Bookshelf Speaker Pair (sensitivity 87 db/1W/1M), you would have a SUPERB sound system for use in an average size room. NO ONE would ever have to apologize for it.

And the whole thing is portable!

I have been using both the -100 and now the -100a with those speakers along with this Stanton S.300 Tabletop CD Player with MP3 Compatibility (it's small enough to be portable too) and the sound quality produced from this system is nothing short of superb.

This little amplifier would actually fit into a pocket (though the 'power brick' would take another pocket). The speakers fit into a gym bag. I am planning to take along this system when we travel.

I have read several reports of 'channel imbalance' with these amps, particularly the -100. Now I do not know what I am doing "right," but I CAN tell you that I hear NO channel imbalance at all with either of my samples of these amps - NONE whatsoever!

I will tell you that I do use "better" cables with my equipment - NOT ridiculously expensive 'exotic' cables, but Stellar Labs SLV-series cables, available from MCM Electronics (when MCM has a sale - which is quite often - their cable prices are almost unbelievable) - these Stellar cables are used to attach the sound source, such as the CD player, to the amp - as well as 12-gauge speaker cable (Parts Express had a 'sale' on AR 12-gauge speaker cable last year and I bought a LOT of it) to connect the amp to the speakers. (These cables fit into my gym bag along with the speakers.)

I cut the speaker cables, which came on 60-foot spools, in half, each 'side' being 30-feet in length. I used the banana plugs which are supplied with the amplifier to connect the wire to the amp and I bought (from Parts Express) some speaker pins to attach the wires to the speakers.

All of the connections are gold-plated and all the wires/cables are thick, heavy-duty, and extremely well-constructed. (The connections on the Stellar cables are particularly robust.)

I do not know if this has anything to do with the "no channel imbalance" present with my samples or if it just 'luck' (if that's the case, I hope it continues!).

Or maybe it's just that the manufacturer in China has gotten its quality control (consistency) tight and you no longer have to worry about any imbalances or other anomalies. I believe that that's what has happened.

If you were to buy this amplifier either from Parts Express (that's where I bought mine) or from Amazon, and if there were to be some noticeable channel imbalance (or any other apparent defect), both of these companies would allow you to exchange the sample at no cost to you.

Frankly, I do not think this problem is as widespread as it may appear at first. I have no doubt that some people did have this problem but I think that it must have been corrected by now. Certainly my units, ordered just as anybody would order them (there's nothing special about me), arrived perfectly in every regard (and the year-old DTA-100 continues to function perfectly).

The one thing I dislike is the naming and marketing of the amp, the fact that it's called the DTA-100a (it SHOULD be called the DTA-60a) and its advertising as a 50 W/channel amp. Dayton Audio (Parts Express) ought to know better. It's a 30 W/channel amp. Period. Distortion of "< 5.0%" (at 50 W/channel) just doesn't cut the 'hi-fi" mustard. You wouldn't want to listen to anything at 5% distortion!

30 W/channel, with a < 0.01% distortion figure, is more like it - a true high-fidelity specification. And that's what this amplifier is.

Of course, when it comes down to brass tacks, the important quality is how the music sounds. In a word, to me it sounds superb. I own a few complete "sound systems" but I told my wife yesterday that, if I absolutely had to, I could live with this one alone. And I mean that!

For use as the heart of a second system, for use when traveling, for use by a child (it's as simple to use as is possible - and the child will NEVER 'outgrow' it), or for many other uses (your choice), I believe you could not buy a better amplifier than this one. And even if larger, more powerful, and more expensive amplifiers or receivers are more versatile, shall we say they offer more connections and features, the sound quality they produce will be no better than the sound quality this one produces. After all, an amplifier is supposed to produce absolutely no "sound coloration" of its own - and this one certainly fulfills that obligation.

Adding an inexpensive audio (or audio/video) switcher box, should you wish (Amazon offers many choices), would allow you to connect several components (CD, cassette, tuner, etc.) at the same time, just like with those expensive receivers - and that would alleviate any "versatility" concerns. And the overall price would still be much lower than that of most "quality" receivers.

If I could, I'd give this DTA-100a 10 stars. Obviously I recommend it highly and I thank you for reading this and for considering my opinions.
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67 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A True Leap Forward, September 2, 2011
By 
Frank L. Giordano (El Paso, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
This incredible little amplifier has allowed me to assemble a very good sounding stereo system for just over $500. Back in 1990, I was an audiophile always looking for better sound. I had about $6000 into a system that sounded extremely good. I had Apogee Stage planar speakers, a rather large Vandersteen powered subwoofer that reached all the way down to 20Hz, B&O preamp and amp, a top of the line turntable and cartridge, an excellent CD player, and a very good quality cassette deck. The system was carefully voiced to the room and there were patches of sound absorbent material on the walls to quell reflections. There were people who spent more, but I was very happy with the system and everyone who heard it was duly impressed. $6000 in 1990 would be $10,000 to $12,000 today. Because of personal circumstances, I dropped out of the audiophile hobby in 1995 and gave the system to a close friend's son. Recently, I got tired of listening to music through portable players and decided to set up another system. I was a lot older and had many other things that took priority financially. I decided to see if I could set up a cheap two channel stereo system that had reasonable sound. I had heard of the Tripath chip sets that allowed manufacturers to put together an incredibly small, low powered amp that was very musical in its sound. These chipsets were supposed to have a wide soundstage, tight bass and clean and well defined treble. Using them, manufacturers built variants of a Class D amplifier that were very small yet very musical. Because they all used the Tripath chip sets, they named them Class T amplifiers (but they are just a variant of a Class D amp). Class D amps are very green. They are super efficient and use 85 to 90% of the electricity to generate power. They only waste 10 to 15% as heat. Because of this, they do not need huge heatsinks. They barely get warm after playing for hours. Recently Dayton Audio came out with one of these micro sized amps that put out some real world power. It is the DTA-100a sold here on Amazon. Into 8 ohms, this little 6 inch by 2 and 3/4 inch box put out a solid 25 watts continuous power per channel into 8 ohms. It was also able to put out much more dynamic power on a temporary basis to drive music peaks without clipping. 25 watts may not sound like a lot but todays speakers are much more efficient than speakers were 20 years ago. Most manufacturers have switched to vented, bass reflex speakers rather than the sealed box, acoustic suspension speakers that were popular years ago. The vented speakers are generally much more efficient and can produce quite loud listening levels on many fewer watts. An amp generating 25 watts continuous into 8 ohms can literally blow you out of the room with one of the more efficient modern speakers. After much reading and research, I bought a pair of Infinity Primus p163 BK speakers from Amazon. These bookshelf speakers are just a little bigger than the average "bookshelf" speaker and they gave a convincing level of bass for something their size. They were rated to be 3 db down at 49 Hz. They had also won all sorts of awards during their life span. Everyone agreed they were a tremendous bargain in an entry level speaker. Plus they are quite efficient and are rated at 90db at 1 meter driven with 1 watt. I paired these with the Dayton Audio DTA-100a. What a surprise! The sound was really great! Solid bass, beautiful midrange and pretty good treble too. This combo could rock when you wanted it to, but it was also amazingly refined with acoustic music. Female voice was gorgeous! Men sounded strong without being too "chesty"! The highs sounded good to me, but I wouldn't rely on my opinion. At my age, I've lost quite a bit of my high frequency hearing, but my wife didn't find them fatiguing and she's very sensitive to the higher frequencies. I did have one problem, however. I was very limited in placement of the speakers and as a result, I ended up with the left speaker picking up a lot of boundary reinforcement from the wall. The system sounded unbalanced with most of the sound seeming to come from the left speaker. I couldn't move them around to correct this, nor could I hang sound absorbent material from the wall (WAF, you know) so I decided on an electronic correction. Back to Amazon and I found an inexpensive preamp that has a balance control; bass, mid and treble tone controls; plus a good quality headphone amp circuit built into it. After reading all the reviews, I bought the Gemini PA-7000 preamp and hooked it into the system. The balance problem was solved. Once more, the soundstage was centered. This inexpensive little preamp is a screaming bargain! There is no hum or noise. I turned the volume all the way up (without any music playing, of course) and put my ear right next to the speakers. Nothing but dead silence! It doesn't color the music either. What comes out is what you put in. And the headphone circuit in this preamp is really good! I listen to it with a set of Sony Professional Monitors and really enjoy the sound. So I had my amp, my preamp, and my speakers. Now all I needed was a music source. I have hundreds of CDs from my audiophile days (I had sold all my vinyl), so I started looking for a good CD player that wasn't ridiculously expensive or too massive. I couldn't find one, so I started looking at DVD players that were called "universal disk players". The best was the Oppo, but it was too pricey for the inexpensive system I was puting together. I read some good reviews about a universal disk player that Pioneer sold in Europe, the DV-610Av, that was also available on Amazon. I chose this to play my CDs, and it has worked marvelously! It will even play the SACD multichannel disks. To do this it has to have a DAC that is 24 bit/192 kHZ. I couldn't believe something so inexpensive had such a relatively high end DAC, but it did.

So, in summary, I spent $170 on the speakers, $100 on the amp, $100 on the preamp, and $110 on the universal disk player. Add to that some decent oxygen free copper 16 ga. speaker wire ($15), a surge surpressor ($12), and two top quality but reasonable 0.5m interconnects from Impact Acoustics, the Sonic Wave silver plated oxygen free copper wire interconnects ($42 for both), all from Amazon, and my system was complete. I can't begin to tell you how pleased I am with this very inexpensive but extremely good sounding and musical system. To build something that sounded like this in 1990, I'd have had to spend thousands. Instead I spent $550 at Amazon and came up with something that will provide me with years of pleasure. I will give a five star rating to all the equipment I mentioned. If you are looking for any of the bits and pieces I mentioned, I can and do sing their praises vey loudly. You will not be disappointed with any of it.
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47 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent amplifier while it worked, May 14, 2011
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
While it worked, Dayton Audio DTA-100a was an excellent medium-power stereo amplifier. It was very neutral and produces a much more detailed and clear sound than my old Sony receiver. An additional benefit is that it is light, hardly takes any space, and accepts world-wide voltage (110-240 Volts). It used to drive a pair of my Mission 772 speakers just fine, even though the speakers have relatively low sensitivity (sensitivity 85 dB, impedance 8 Oh, recommended amp 25-100 W). Note that DTA-100a specifications claim low total harmonic distortion (THD < 0.01%) only for output power up to 30 Watts (thus, you effectively have 30 Watts instead of 50 Watts per channel, two channels in total). The amplifier's manual says that the speaker impedance must be at least 6 Ohm (otherwise you can check a less powerful Dayton Audio DTA-1 amplifier, also sold on amazon).

Dayton DTA-100a is a type T amplifier, it is a new technology. I bet that in few years, as this technology develops further and T-amps become more powerful, makers of old-style heavy and bulky amplifiers will have hard time selling their "dinosaurs". Note that this is a review for DTA-100a, not an earlier model DTA-100 (DTA-100 has a slight channel imbalance problem, DTA-100a does not). You can also find a detailed review on the web by searching for "Dayton Audio DTA-100a - class D integrated amplifier".

USEFUL HINT: if the amplifier's power indicator blue light is annoyingly too bright for you (as it was for me), then use a small piece of dark paper and a duck tape to cover and dim it.

P.S. Failed after a month (one of the audio channels died), but I got a replacement and I am still happy. They should had made it more reliable even if it would have cost little more money.

P.P.S. It is great while it works. The replacement unit failed after 14 months (2 months after the warranty expired). I listen to music infrequently and do not like it loud. This amplifier is very unreliable. I am downgrading Dayton amplifier from 5 to 3 stars for that. I bought Topping TP22 TK2050 amplifier from Amazon as a replacement, it has the same Tripath TK2050 chip as Dayton Audio DTA-1. Will see for how long it will last.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Up in smoke, took new speakers with it. Be cautious!, December 11, 2011
By 
Steve Wetherill (Walnut Creek CA, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I bought one of these from Parts Express. It sounded great with a new pair of Sony speakers that I picked up locally from Fry's. I noticed that the balance was not quite spot-on (one channel louder than the other), and the blue light on the front was dazzlingly bright, but otherwise it seemed good value. HOWEVER, after a few days, we were awoken in the wee small hours by an absolutely deafening sound, and a smell of burning electronics. We'd left the unit switched on after watching a movie, though there was no active sound source. For some unknown reason, the amplifier had gone haywire, and it was producing the deafening noise we had heard, which ranged from squeals to grunts with everything in between. Our dogs were going absolutely crazy because of the noise. There was also a smell of burning as I said, which was coming from the unit, AND from the new Sony speakers.

I returned the unit to Parts Express, and obtained a refund. I acquired an AudioSource amp to replace the Dayton, and that has been flawless. HOWEVER, the Dayton had burned out both of the Sony speakers! Fortunately they were replaced with no questions asked by Fry's.

I did post a review stating the above on the Parts Express site, but it does not seem to be visible on the site for some reason.

In summary, I would advise caution with this amp. Perhaps my experience was the exception, but I was spooked enough to write both the review on the Parts Express site, and this one.

Update 12/29/2012: Some commenters have suggested that I used 4 ohm speakers, and that this could have been to blame for the untimely demise of the amp (and speakers). In fact, the speakers were Sony SS F5000 (8 ohm) speakers. This was an amplifier issue.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Sound for Desktop. BELIEVE THE HYPE, February 25, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
I finally got on this chip amp bandwagon when it was time to upgrade my office/desk stereo speakers. Years of crappy computer speakers have been banished thanks to these new mini amplifiers and some affordable speakers from Parts-Express/Dayton Audio.

If you do a common google search for "desk top audiophile" or something you get lots of hits for the Dayton Audio b652 speakers paired with a lepai 2020+ amp. I did that and immediately bought that set up and ran it on my desk with a radio shack Optimus SWS-502 passive subwoofer. I was amazed at the sound from this unit. I mean it really was nice.

However, I realized there was more potential here with these chip-based amplifiers so I spent a little bit more money for the Dayton Audio DTA-100a amplifier to replace the Lepai.

The Dayton is a much nicer amplifier, better construction, higher power, much better/beefier power supply (the included supply with the lepai is really small, you need to buy a better one for that unit, which increases costs.), all the cables you need--except speaker wire--(including a 1/4 headphone adapter),etc.

This sounds great and now there is some power there in reserve. The Lepai would start clipping before you got the sound where you needed it whereas this Dayton will get too loud for the office real quick. This amp has much more power, better performance than the Lepai, made the B-652s sound even better.

Things I do NOT like about this DTA-100a:

1. The blue LED on the front is of eye piercing brightness. Really annoying. Like someone is welding out of the corner of your eye. They should dim this down a bunch or switch colors.

2. The volume knob does NOT turn the amp all the way down if you turn it all the way down. this isn't right is it? When you turn it down it should go down, not get to "almost quiet" and then stay there.

3. There are other alternatives around that may, in fact, offer better performance/value. I am speaking of TD7492-based amps by Sure Electronics (and others.) I believe Sure makes the DTA-100a, but I just got the 7492 amp from them for much less money than the DTA-100a. It also has a stepped attenuator for volume control instead of the pot, does NOT have the too bright blue LED, and I think it sounds better. However, it comes without a power supply, none of the nice cables and adapters, none of the good customer service from Parts-Express,etc. But other audiophiles dismissed the 7492, so it seems like they are blowing these out for a song right now (March 2013.)

In short, you can drive yourself nuts with this hi-fi stuff. I think these little amps are an amazing development. Amazing sound in a small package that is affordable. And I find that the DTA-100a is a much better amp than the little lepai everyone talks about and I recommend skipping that one and just buying the Dayton DTA-100a.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars better choices available, March 25, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
This Dayton t-amp is not built very well. From what I read on the reviews, I thought I'd give it a try... maybe Dayton has rectified the issue... Not yet.
I had the notorious L and R channel imbalance problem. With the volume dial all the way down R channel was silent, and L channel equal to moderately loud speaking levels. I could not turn the L channel down past this level of volume as any more would engage the off switch at the end of the volume dial, powering the unit down.
I have had the SMSL SA-50 (50x2 wpc @4ohm) for almost 1 year now. It is much better! I highly recommend looking at the SMSL or Topping instead of Dayton.
Acceptable fit + finish. Poor build quality. Unit does not function as intended.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Seek alternatives in this price range., May 15, 2012
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
This is a quality AMP but it isn't a good value for the price. It is built well and the sound is clean, however, the bass is too heavy on my Infinity Reference 2000.2 speakers, requiring me to use an equalizer on my PC. I've tried FIVE amps and only two of them were bass-heavy on my setup, so I feel any speaker with a mid-size woofer (3-6") is going to produce the same result as mine are direct-wire/crossover free and very sonically neutral speakers.

This was also the only AMP I tried that made a soft 'pop' whenever powered on. The lack of a pop filter (simply an internal capacitor) is a cut corner. Aor a $100 AMP, the second most expensive in this class, this is ridiculous. The packaging is top notch, the power adapter is decent quality and doesn't get hot like some others, and the device itself (other than the obnoctiously blue LED light) is very sleek and professional looking.

The amp's I've tried: Pyle PCA4 (actually failed), Lepai Tripath (great value), Topping TP30 (worse quality than the DTA100a for more money), Audiosource AMP100 (best of the lot), and this Dayton DTA100A, all between $70-$110. I've been happiest with the Audiosource AMP100. Although it is larger than every other AMP in this class, it has the best input/output options (even 4ohm stable, unlike the DTA100a) and the only AMP with an integrated power supply.

Even though I've settled for the Audiosource AMP50 and have been very happy with it over the last few months, there is no denying the value of the Lepai Tripath. It was the only other AMP that sounded sonically correct, produced the right level of bass when dialed to zero, and it was the LEAST expensive. Although somewhat cheap looking, it feels very well built. If you can get over the external power supply and asthetics, it is the best value in this class of T-amps. Otherwise, stick with something from Audiosource.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dead, September 15, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
It was okay while it lasted, the crackling when changing the volume was annoying as well as the bright blue light, and then it died.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars multiple failures, July 23, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
whomever is building these is awful. I have had two and both have issues. I would seriously recommend looking elsewhere for this type of product.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Specific Use Power Amplifier, with serious problems, September 14, 2012
By 
This review is from: Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Amplifier 50 WPC (Black) (Discontinued by Manufacturer) (Electronics)
October 3, 2012: The Amazon page shows that this amplifier is IN STOCK. It is NOT in stock. Moments ago, I spoke with Parts Express customer service. At the earliest, this amplifier will be available for shipment on October 23, 2012.

INITIAL REVIEW: Before I begin, I should preface my comments with the fact that I've had a 1st Class (now called General) Broadcast Engineer's license since 1974. I know a bit about audio gear, although I define myself as an analog guy trapped in a digital world.
The Dayton Audio DTA-100a Class-T Digital Mini Amplifier is not a substitute for a stereo receiver. Amazon sells the Sherwood RX-4105 100 Watt Stereo Receiver for about 15-bucks more than the Dayton Audio DTA-100a. It's AM-FM, has tone controls, balance controls, has multiple inputs, outputs, is rated at the same RMS power, etc.
So, why do I have the DTA-100a? The sound is extremely clean; frankly, as clean as any amplifier I've ever heard. I don't know if the power rating is correct. My sense is that it's closer to 35 watts RMS per channel. I use the DTA-100a with a GE 73344 4-Way switcher for audio and video that runs into a Technics graphic equalizer, then to the DTA-100a. I had the good fortune to acquire two (very old stock) brand new Boston Acoustics VR-12 speakers, originally built as center channel speakers, but are being used as my stereo mains in this system. I'm also using a Dayton Audio SA100 100W Subwoofer Amplifier with a Pioneer TS-W309S4 12" Subwoofer. The sound is extraordinarily good. So far, I've had no problems. The sound is clear and clean and neither channel is cutting out or imbalanced. I'm satisfied...BUT..I only set up the system yesterday. Let's hope that Robert Cray and Stanley Clarke continue to entertain my neighborhood.

ADDED: September 21, 2012
I'm now awaiting an RMA from Parts Express. The volume control no longer functions, so that with first "click" on, the amplifier is at full volume. I got only one week's use before a problem ensued. I hope that no speakers have been damaged. I'm exchanging it for an identical amplifier, but am somewhat concerned that the problem is endemic to this amplifier. The customer service representative didn't seem at all surprised that I'd encountered this problem. In fact, when I began to explain what had happened, he finished my explanation for me.

ADDED: October 3, 2012
Although Parts Express customer service representative said I would receive an RMA for the defective unit via email by the end of the business day on September 21. I did not receive it for three days, and only after I phoned Parts Express and asked to speak with Jeff Stahl, the company's owner. That seemed to expedite the RMA. Parts Express received the defective amplifier 48 hours after I sent it. FedX documentation showed receipt was September 26, 2012. On October 2, 2012, having not received a tracking number for a replacement amplifier, I phoned Parts Express. I was told that the DTA-100a is on backorder; no on-hand inventory, but that Parts Express is expecting a shipment sometime after October 23, 2012. I asked the customer service representative why I hadn't been notified that the amplifier was, at the earliest, three weeks away from being available. He replied, politely, but in a very matter of fact tone, "On return replacements, backorder notification isn't one of our procedures. We do, however, have you slotted in to receive a replacement when they arrive. Currently twenty-three people are waiting, just as you are."

The long and short: Regardless of how many have been sold, customer service has been horrid and it appears that the amplifier has a very high failure rate.

For a few less dollars, Amazon offers the AudioSource AMP-100 Stereo Power Amplifier, with the same power and more controls. You'd be wise to make that your choice.
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