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54 of 57 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars GOT A GOOD REASON: Daytripper
DAYTRIPPER is a mysterious little book. I read the first three issues when they came out, and though I was absolutely intrigued by what was happening in the story, the way each installment came and ended without explanation made me not want to have to work through the serialization. Rather, I wanted to get it all at once. It's a book where the payoff is going to require...
Published on February 27, 2011 by Jamie S. Rich

versus
63 of 86 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well-Worn Day Trip
At the risk of getting a few "not helpful" votes, I'm forging ahead and posting this reveiw. And I'm probably not the right guy to be reviewing daytripper, but maybe someone will find this an interesting counterbalance. Sometimes, I think we are all reluctant to post less than four or five star reviews, but they can be useful, can't they?

I am absolutely sure...
Published on June 24, 2011 by Jeffrey Penn May


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Daytripper is a moving story about life, April 30, 2011
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This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
If you don't read things because they are graphic novels or comics because they are "for kids" then you are missing out. I've read two in the past year which easily stand up to some of the greatest non-graphic novels of all time. The first was Logicomix by Apostolos Doxiadis and Christos Papadimitriou and now there is Daytripper by Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon.

Daytripper is the story about one man's life living in the shadow of his father (a world famous author). He struggles to free himself from the shadow of his father, make a name for himself, experience love and loss, all while dying on each of the most important days of his life. His death always revealing something about how we evaluate our own lives, success and failures. It makes us examine our own situation to rethink our values and what we consider to be important or hinge our happiness on. By the end I was in tears (in a good way).
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars best thing in years, May 11, 2011
This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
I'm not going to waste many words on this. How it comes together in the end moved my to tears. The structure defines modern storytelling; it's an externalization of an internal struggle about the meaning of life. How'd you feel if you died next month? Or 6 years ago? What would you've accomplished, would the death have been in vain or would it have been a happy one?

This book, this story and the way it's told, made me point out that all art in life should be about just that: about LIFE. Memories shaping the meanings of our lifes.

I could go on, but as I said I'm not gonna waste many more words on this. After you've read it you want your mother to read it.

A comic? She'll say.

You'll say yes. A f***ng comic.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great story, May 31, 2013
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This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
Somehow when I bought it I had no idea it was a graphic novel, so that was a surprise. My girlfriend at the time made fun of me incessantly for reading a "comic book" when we were at the beach. But she was an idiot anyway. The story is great and the read is short. I'm happy this was my first experience with this kind of story telling.
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4.0 out of 5 stars What really matters in life? An existential exploration in graphic novel form, November 8, 2014
This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
Brás de Oliva Domingos has many lives and many deaths. Told in a series of well-paced, flowing vignettes, Daytripper by Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá chronicles all these lives and deaths to show how precious life is. It's a story with strong existential hues, asking the eternal question about what's really important in life. What are the moments that matter? The answer is obvious of course, but it takes not just a lifetime but many lifetimes for Brás to get to the right answer. Each replay or turn of the wheel of Brás's life is another chance for him to mull over and figure out those questions.

There is no linear time here and the narrative jumps around so that we see Brás at different ages throughout. In chapter one, Brás is turning thirty-two-years-old; and then in the next chapter, he is twenty-one. At his oldest, he is seventy-six; the youngest we see him at is eleven or so. Each life focuses on some life-turning event—a budding romance; a failed relationship; the birth of a child; a life-changing trip with a friend—and is also filled with quiet moments, the moments we usually don't remember. Each chapter ends in a finite way, though the authors disrupt the pattern tellingly in the last chapter.

If only we had that kind of do-over in real life? Or maybe it's the karmic wheel at work here because the progression seems to move Brás from confusion toward a better understanding of his own life.

I think this graphic novel would have worked better for me if it weren't so mawkishly sentimental and focused so obsessively on this one, single character. Each inevitable death that comes feels more and more diminished and the repetition becomes tiresome, decreasing rather than increasing the tragedy and melancholy for me. As an astute reviewer put it: "Death is the ultimate consequence. There are no higher stakes than those of an existential conflict. The linear suspense this generates can be deployed as a narrative engine forward (Will the hero survive? Does the hero deserve to live?) or in flashback. (Why did the hero die? What significance did the hero's death have?) However, invoking a single-beat rhythm of chapter-ending caesurae through a sequence of unrelated, arbitrary endings, removes conflict and unpredictability. … With no turning of the screw, no stakes or consequences, why care?"

Still, Daytripper is a lofty idea conceptually and an even better story executed in visual form. The dreamy watercolor panels are beautifully drawn and filled in. I found myself thinking, yes, life as a watercolor painting is pitch-perfect here, the way memories and events seem to soak, deepen, bleed, and fade.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Tale That's Beautifully Illustrated, March 9, 2014
By 
tvtv3 "tvtv3" (St. Louis Metro East Area) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
To begin with, when I first started reading DAYTRIPPER, I was impressed with the illustrations. The illustrations are beautiful and although not photographic-like, they capture the essence of everything around them. The illustrations in the book feel quite real.

DAYTRIPPER was written by two Brazilian twins. It follows the life of Bras de Olivia Domingos. It takes a little while to understand what's happening in the book as the book jumps forward and backward in the history of Bras' life. Not only that, but most of the chapters end in his death. That's because Bras spends the early years of his adult life after college writing obituaries for a newspaper. He is the only son of a famous Brazilian author and, like his famous father, Bras has a knack for the written word. DAYTRIPPER explores some of the major events and some of the smaller events in his life. Bras wants to live a life full of meaning and he often finds himself questioning if he truly is.

Although the chapters where Bras dies aren't true, much of the story in those sections is. They are just alternative ways Bras life could have ended and, I believe, they are ways he imagines how they could have. The book explores some very deep and universal questions, such as when do you truly begin living (is it the day you are born? After your first kiss? When you truly fall in love for the first time? After you get your first job? When you're married?). Most people just exist in life, but Bras follows the call (even though he doesn't know it) that all of yearn for, the call to truly live.

Upon initially reading DAYTRIPPER, I was confused. It took me awhile to figure out what was going on with the story. Although I still prefer more traditional narratives (instead of the one in this book that mixes the actual story with fictional endings), the device ends up working in DAYTRIPPER.

Overall, DAYTRIPPER is an interesting read with some excellent illustrations. Not everyone will enjoy reading the book, but if you can accept the storytelling device, it makes for a compelling tale.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Celebrating Life, June 3, 2013
This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba's graphic novel, Daytripper, is a book that celebrates life by making us confront death. This is a book to be savored and celebrated; it takes the comic book form to rarely achieved heights by focusing not on super-humans, but on very human moments. For someone new to comics, this book could serve as a powerful introduction to show that comics can achieve emotional heights as meaningful as any novel. For those familiar with the genre, Daytripper will serve as a refreshing reminder that comics can move and stir you while respecting your intelligence.

With consistently beautiful art and crisp prose, in each chapter we find the same character, Bras, at a different point in his life. Whether as a child, anticipating the birth of his own child as an adult, or as an old man, we encounter Bras as he experiences major life events, both joyful and painful. There are frequent references to Bras' profession as an obituary writer and this serves as a vehicle for the authors to provide commentary on fundamental life questions: How do we want to be remembered? Will we regret risks we did not take? Do we realize the impact, whether positive or negative, we have on those around us? If Bras could write his own obituary, what would he want it to say?

What makes Daytripper truly special is that in answering these questions, it does more showing than telling. Some of the best parts of this book are wordless panels showing faces full of nuanced emotions. And most readers should be able to relate to at least one of the vignettes from Bras' life. In the end, the vibrant mission statement of this book is that we must not let our fear of death, unforeseen circumstances, or tragedy prevent us from remembering that as long as we are alive, we have the choice of how we want to live.
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5.0 out of 5 stars He's got a ticket to ride and he don't care, January 27, 2012
This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
This is the life of Bras de Oliva Domingos, told in chapters which single out a memorable year in his life, jumping from his life at age 32 to his life age 11 to his life age 76. And at the end of each chapter, Bras dies (it's a nuance that sounds strange here but makes sense in the book).

Bras is an obituary writer aching to become a respected novelist like his father, a world famous writer, who casts a long shadow across his son. Meanwhile we see Bras' life filled with characters like an ex-girlfriend he met on a boat, his best friend who dodged a near-death experience only to change him irrevocably, to meeting the love of his life, and raising children of his own.

I loved this book. It's the kind of book you find yourself turning back the pages to stare at the panels and really savour them, maybe even subconsciously trying to prolong the book as the pages fly by. First and foremost is Fabio Moon's artwork - stunning doesn't give it enough emphasis. His artwork is a cross between Will Eisner's and Craig Thompson's, every panel he drew was a panel I wish I could carry around with me in my head, they're so beautiful. Just look at the amount of detail he puts into the most static of scenes, the small details he packs into every available space. It's so inspiring.

There needs to be a special mention for the colourist on the book, Dave Stewart. He does a phenomenal job, taking Moon's art and making it better. Just turn to any page in the book and look at how the colour pops out of the page. The scenes where Bras is 21 and at the fishing village were so gorgeous, I wanted to live in those pages. Or the countryside of Bras' youth when he was 11 - ah, I can't describe it, just look at it, it's amazing. I can't underline how good Stewart's colouring is in the book, I really think it made the book that much more successful. Imagine if the book had been in black and white - it's not the same is it?

The combination between Moon's artwork and Stewart's colours is lethal. I swear the people in the panels moved. The smoke wafts up in the page, the seas shimmer in the sunset glow. It's truly extraordinary.

And the storytelling's not bad either! Every chapter contains some truth, some moment that captures a feeling or experience anyone has gone through and does so with grace and elegance. There wasn't a dull chapter to read and even when there isn't a murder or a passionate love affair or a sickening loss, and is simply about a time of Bras' life when he was just happy and content with the way things were, you find yourself totally enraptured with the words and art in a way so few books can do.

"Daytripper" is magic, pure and true, distilled masterfully by Fabio Moon, his twin brother Gabriel Ba, and Dave Stewart. It's a shining example of the excellence of the comics medium and an instant classic to be enjoyed and revered by everyone who reads it. It's a jewel of a book just waiting to be discovered, and one to return to for those, like myself, who have read it and loved it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars welcome to your life, November 18, 2011
This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
Daytripper has to be one of the more wholly representative works of the graphic novel genre. All components imagined, written and sketched by Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba are so effortlessly, subtly synthesized into a breezy evocation not just of Brasilian life, but life itself. It's the work of a pair of brothers with nothing to prove beyond simple but effective storytelling. Though by no means slow, it is a story in which everything takes its time to unfold, perhaps one integral trait of South American or Brasilian culture.

It is the story, or perhaps stories, of nothing more than Bras de Oliva Domingos, obituary writer and aspiring novelist. Looking to parallel the literary success of his father, Bras is an ordinary individual striving for some balance apart from Brasil's numerous sensory distractions, constantly reminded to grasp the importance of living and dying in the moment. To be sure, there are plenty of distractions in Brasil, such as his friendships, family, loves and dreams, but none contemplated without quiet deliberation and perhaps a strong cup of coffee. Such deliberations are shown through a series of vignettes of various time periods in his life, each detailing the circumstances of these spontaneous moments when living and dying get in the way of his daily routine. These momentous accumulations, with a Tarantino-esque flair for anachronism, are caressingly startling. It is here where Ba and Moon confound the reader as to the intersection of reality and our dreams, and the wonder of life and death.

Like fellow Brasilian Rubem Fonseca, Daytripper provides a peek into the culture of passion in Brasilian South America. Despite the instances of death and violence in the work, there is an equal amount of warmth between the characters in their mutual goal of embracing the present. Additionally, the undertones of social and ethnic equality perceived in Brasil, exhibited through Bras and comrade Jorge, is also refreshing. Violence, inevitable as it is everywhere, is simply accepted as a sporadic part of life, a tolerated cost of a naturally unhurried and carefree lifestyle.

The lush coloring from Dave Stewart and sharp sketches from Ba and Moon make Daytripper an achingly quick read. For as much as the story emphasizes a deliberate and dreamlike pondering about life, it's so engaging one can't help but devour the atmosphere.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A perfect entry into the world of graphic novels, October 22, 2012
This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
As someone new to reading graphic novels, I was blown away by what the genre can achieve.

Alan Moore (author of Watchmen, V for Vendetta and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen) explained the reason he has always been against movie adaptations of his novels has been because if they were meant to be movies they would be movies, and if they were meant to be straight novels they would be straight novels. He writes graphic novels because that is the medium that best tells his story. Never was this theory more true than in the case of Moon and Ba's frankly spectacular piece of art. I was mesmerised from the outset and read it all in one go, wishing I could forget each chapter so I could read it all over again with the same sense of being transported by the images, story, the characters, the beautiful colouring.

Reading this book brought to mind the magical realism that pervades much of the well-known literature from South and Central America (the novels of Gael Garcia Marquez and Like Water for Chocolate to name two of the most famous - and my favourite - examples). For me, this book is a classic that fits just as easily on the shelf next to the greats like Marquez as it does on the racks of a comic book store. This book is a wonderful example of just how talented, exciting, innovative and yet mindful of the legacy of classic literature the world of graphic novels can be. It got me hooked on a genre that is now something of an addiction for me and for that I shall be eternally grateful to Moon and Ba, I just hope they produce something else as spectacular as soon as possible, I can't wait!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good read., August 21, 2011
By 
Thorgal (new york ,ny) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Daytripper (Paperback)
Well worth the money and time spent to read it. Simple but great story about life. Makes you really think what we are here for and how fragile a life can be. Made me give my wife a big hug and go for a long walk.
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Daytripper
Daytripper by Fábio Moon (Paperback - February 8, 2011)
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