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DeGaulle: The Rebel 1890-1944 (Vol. 1) (Norton Paperback) Paperback – May 17, 1993


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DeGaulle: The Rebel 1890-1944 (Vol. 1) (Norton Paperback) + De Gaulle: The Ruler 1945-1970 (Vol. 2)
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Product Details

  • Series: Norton Paperback
  • Paperback: 642 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (May 17, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393309991
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393309997
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #513,189 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Jean Lacouture is a French journalist and historian.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mr Bassil A MARDELLI on March 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
Although De Gaulle's entries have the ring of memoirs written after the event, they may well have been spoken.
Fateful moments tend to evoke grandeur of speech, especially in French parlance.
The General has always been a reference for Middle East scholars and politicians alike ...........

Jean Lacouture is a great writer, and I love to read his books.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is an excellent volume on the life of the great French Leader. This book chronicles the early years including DeGaulle's time as a German Prisoner of War during World War I. The book concludes with DeGaulle's triumphant return to Paris after the liberation in 1944 and is hailed as a national hero. While DeGaulle is really a controversial world figure, he is still a person of great historical importance in the world and France in particular. This book is a great read and is well researched and presented. A must read for anyone who wants to know about the life of Charles DeGaulle.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Goldman on March 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
It's probably too early to write a good scholarly biography of De Gaulle. "The test of time" might require centuries; and the truth about highly questionable individuals -- Alexander Hamilton, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, Dishonest Abe Lincoln, Henry VIII Tutor, and William III of Orange and then men of 1688 -- is flatly denied centuries later by would-be hagiographers, ideological propagandists, and molders of plaster saints. It might be too early because De Gaulle, like Eisenhower, so carefully guarded his private life -- who was always an actor on a stage, playing the self-created role of "General de Gaulle" -- that we're likely not to get the "inside view" of the man anytime soon. Perhaps just as well, he himself quoting, in _Le Fil de l'Épée_ that "no man is a hero to his valet". It might be too early also for the simple reason that the French State doesn't open their files to historians for 50 years.

The author of this two volume study is a journalist, not a historian; yet given a time when the university is swamped with the plague of Cultural Marxists and Sixty-Eighters, maybe it takes a journalist to do the job. That said, the two volumes of this work are probably the best biography that we have so far, at least in English. A pity that it could not have been published as the French edition in 3 vols. One would have wish a bit more about the first 50 years of his life, and more about his views on strategy and command of the military. How close was he to Petain in the 20s? To Charles Maurras? Did he really wish the restoration of the Monarchy? The 2nd vol begins to run thin with the events of 68, as one ought expect for a work published when it was.

Still, the best most complete study so far, to be put alongside Daniel J.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Francis McInerney on December 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
An excellent work, it paints a harsh portrait of de Gaulle. A brave man with physical courage to go, he was possibly one of the greatest military thinkers in history. But he was vain, socially and politically unskilled, and an extremely poor judge of those on whom he depended to fulfill his ambitions: Churchill and, especially, Roosevelt.

Unable to gauge these two, or to assess their intentions from their side of the table, he stumbled from miscalculation to miscalculation. Only the greater mistakes of others like Giraud and the fact that most of France was sidelined by occupation and collaboration gave him the opportunities he used and these none too successfully.

Worse for de Gaulle, he could not see, as Roosevelt did so clearly, that post war France would have no greater status than a large U.S. state. Roosevelt toyed with de Gaulle as he would have toyed with any the state governor hopeful seeking his attention. De Gaulle neither understood this nor forgave it. Neither has France.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gilbert Michaud on December 4, 2008
Format: Paperback
the three volumes in french called le rebelle le politique and le souverain are not avauilable here in two books called the rebel and the ruler. both great works .
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