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Dead Poets Society Mass Market Paperback – September 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Voice (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401308775
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401308773
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 4.2 x 6.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #414,261 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Todd Anderson and his friends at Welton Academy can hardly believe how different life is since their new English professor, the flamboyant John Keating, has challenged them to "make your lives extraordinary! " Inspired by Keating, the boys resurrect the Dead Poets Society--a secret club where, free from the constraints and expectations of school and parents, they let their passions run wild. As Keating turns the boys on to the great words of Byron, Shelley, and Keats, they discover not only the beauty of language, but the importance of making each moment count.

But the Dead Poets pledges soon realize that their newfound freedom can have tragic consequences. Can the club and the individuality it inspires survive the pressure from authorities determined to destroy their dreams? --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

Todd Anderson and his friends at Welton Academy can hardly believe how different life is since their new English professor, the flamboyant John Keating, has challenged them to "make your lives extraordinary!  " Inspired by Keating, the boys resurrect the Dead Poets Society--a secret club where, free from the constraints and expectations of school and parents, they let their passions run wild.  As Keating turns the boys on to the great words of Byron, Shelley, and Keats, they discover not only the beauty of language, but the importance of making each moment count.



But the Dead Poets pledges soon realize that their newfound freedom can have tragic consequences.  Can the club and the individuality it inspires survive the pressure from authorities determined to destroy their dreams? --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The time frame is different and very well portrait with a mixture of great actors and music.
Tatiana Serrano
And since the story is just breathtaking, it seems impossible to write a "bad" book about it!
"cjk_05"
The story shows how you can make your life extraordinary and that it is good to seize the day.
Buschimann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 1, 2007
Format: Paperback
I love Dead Poets Society. In fact, it's one of the best movies I've watched, ever. It was one of those that deeply moved and touched me. The stories of these boy's lives touched me, as they were so true to life.

However, after reading the book of the movie, I have to say I'm left terribly unimpressed. It read more like a kid's novel than anything else. It lacked depth and emotion. The characters were all made out to be shallow, childish and weak, while Mr. Keating's part in the changing of the boy's lives was terribly downplayed. Some of the very poignant scenes in the movie were simply not justified in the book.

I have to say though, that I have to give credit to the author for some of the extended scenes that were deleted in the movie, but apart from that, it's a big disappointment. It's okay for a read of the outline, but really, you have to watch the movie to really know and understand what DPS is about.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dai-keag-ity on September 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Although it makes me smile to say this now, when I was in middle school, I used to leave this movie in the VCR and watch it almost every morning as I was getting up for school. Something about its 1950's New England setting and cast that all came together to make it important to me. I loved its message of unconventionality and personal freedom of expression. I liked the new worlds the teacher, Mr. Keating, said poetry could open up to a reader. Time passed, I kind of got away from DPS (a film I sadly outgrew) and it wasn't until many years later as I was cruising the book section of a thrift store that I came upon the novel to this movie. Remembering the way this timelessly inspirational story used to make me happy, I bought the book and read it in one sitting. For anyone who was ever touched by Dead Poet's Society I recommend this book. To anyone else, skip it, there's not a lot here for you: no new characters, same sad ending, same time, same place. Dead Poet's Society the book reads exactly like a director's cut extended version of the Peter Weir movie, including in its length a handful of scenes the film never contained. It also has a few lines that were spicier than the dialogue in the motion picture and there's a stronger suggestion of exactly what Charlie 'Newanda' Dalton got up to with those college-age girls from town he brought to the Dead Poet's meeting that one night. I still have this little novel and I'm glad I bought it. I only wish I'd owned it back in the day when Dead Poet's Society was among my favorite movies.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed reading "Dead Poets Society", because I think it's a very special book. The topic is not usual though.
Sometimes the story was a bit boring. But when I had finished the book I was very thoughtful. I couldn't understand the reaction of Mr. Nolan and Mr. Perry because I liked Mr. Keating and his style of teaching. His ideas of enjoying life and trying to be extraordinary were very interesting. He could also make me think about my own life and how to live it. He showed his students that they had only one life and that they had to bear responsibility for it. And I think that's right.
The novel can also show parents what can happen if they tell their children how to live. They shouldn't decide about their children's life.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
I find the book very interesting and well written and it's not too difficult to understand for somebody who learns English as a second language.
Thr novel shows the life of some students in a private school and deals with their problems, frustrations and their dreams. The message of the novel is to have an opinion of one's own and to do what you want. But the book shows us too that there are people who have problems to realise their ideas so that they can't help resigning and giving up
The novel is a bit different from the movie.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kathrin Blum on April 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
I would highly recommend the book and the movie to all ages.It is an inspiring and marvelous story that gives me food for thought.The message of the movie/book is that you should "seize the day" and you should make your life extraordinary. Mr. Keating teaches his students to follow the way of the heart and he makes them to personages and freethinkers.The boys admir Mr. Keating and for them he is an idol, that is why they reopen the "Dead Poets Society" club.Neil plays Puck in the "Midsummernight's Dream" but his father forbids him to join in the play.He has to live up to their expectations and he should become a doctor, but everything changes and the movie reveals a dramatic ending. Everybody should watch the movie on his own because it is a great one and perhaps you will receive the message that changes your life. "Carpe diem!"
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Katie on April 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
I watched the film and I was very impressed by the strong conflict between the authority and the freeminded people. The director filled the scenes with beauty, love and humor but also with violence and the cold and strictly ruled atmosphere at Welton Academy. Mr. Keating tries to get the boys out of that coldness and to make them come up with their own thoughts. But he underestimates the danger and the consequences are horrible, because he and the boys don't have enough power to revolt against the authority symbolized by the parents and Mr. Nolan. But nevertheless Keating changes their lives, in a positive way for all of them. I like the the film, but I would have prefered to watch it without stopping it every minute and analyzing all the scenes. Carpe diem!
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