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Dead Pool: Lake Powell, Global Warming, and the Future of Water in the West Hardcover – January 5, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First Edition edition (January 5, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520254775
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520254770
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #462,636 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

For some, “dead pool” is a betting game involving the death of celebrities. What Powell is referring to is the emptying of the arid West’s precious reservoirs, prime among them Lake Powell, which was created when the Colorado River was dammed in 1963, submerging Glen Canyon, one of the planet’s most spectacular places. The reservoir was a recreational haven until 2005, when it fell to one-third of its capacity. Given the enormous water needs of our desert metropolises—Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Phoenix—this is a catastrophe in the making. Powell presents a scientifically grounded inquiry into the grievous failure of the West’s megadams, which for all their colossal expense and engineering marvels wreak environmental havoc now exacerbated by global warming. For all its detail, this is an involving exposé as Powell vividly portrays a motley cast of characters, from hydrologists to power brokers; wryly parses the disastrous mix of Bureau of Reclamation politics and water policy; dramatically chronicles the pitched battles between dug-in government officials and improvising environmentalists; and offers lucid analysis of the difficult choices ahead. --Donna Seaman

Review

“A historically important, well-timed, and memorable addition to the growing library of books about water and the West.”
(Wilson Quarterly 2009-01-01)

“A solid primer on the history of use of Colorado River water and the science of climate change.”
(Science (AAAS) 2009-01-23)

“A suspense thriller, a history . . . and an informed warning. . . . Deserves to be read now, before we make even more mistakes.”
(High Country News 2009-05-18)

“A must read for Colorado River buffs, as well as anyone who wants a glimpse of what lies ahead for water.”
(Earth Magazine 2009-05-12)

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Customer Reviews

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See several posts on the book over at Waterwired.
David Zetland
Powell's book takes you on a long mule ride in time down the Colorado River and Lake Powell.
Wayne Lusvardi
Someone like Ed Abbey, or an Ed Abbey fan, would love this book.
S. J. Snyder

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Wayne Lusvardi on January 13, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The apocalyptic book Dead Pool tells us that there is a 50% chance of Lake Powell and the whole Colorado River dam system ending up as a "dead pool" by 2017 to 2021, OR SOONER, due to global warming (p. 184). Dead pool is defined as a permanent condition when the water level behind a dam is too low to spill water or generate hydroelectric power.

Powell extols early Colorado River explorer and anti-urban founder of the U.S. Geological Survey, John Wesley Powell, which Lake Powell is named after. But author James Powell never tells us if he is related.
Powell is a master story teller and educator. His book will teach the average reader much about the water system in the Southwest. He starts his book with an apocalyptic story of near dam collapse of the Glen Canyon Dam due to too much water in 1983; and ends his book with the story of how civilization in the Southwestern U.S., like the Indians in Chaco Canyon in the 12th century, will end soon due to too little water due to global warming resulting in dead and over-silted dams.

For proof positive Powell has a graphic photo on the cover of his book showing the present-day bathtub ring on Lake Powell; way, way above the water line. How could he be wrong? Look at the picture. Run the numbers and look at the data as Powell has done.
But the gnawing question after reading Powell's apocalyptic book remains: is he right; and if so, how right?

One of the centerpieces of Powell's argument is a bar graph on page 164 which shows the 10-Year Average Annual Flow at the northerly point of the Colorado River dam system from 1896 to 2007 measured in acre feet (an acre foot of water is one foot high of water spread over an acre of land; able to support about two urban families for a year).
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By James Kay on May 31, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It's been 20 years now since Marc Reisner wrote Cadillac Desert. If you enjoyed it as much as I did, Dead Pool is a must read. With all that has changed regarding western water issues since 1989, Dr. Powell does an excellent job of updating the topic and adding historical perspective to those go-go years of dam building by the Bureau of Reclamation during the 50's and 60s. While Reisner could not have imagined the effects of climate change on the overused waters of the Colorado River, Dead Pool also provides eye-opening documentation on how global warming may well be the straw that breaks the camel's back. With Lake Mead at historic lows and Lake Powell little more than half full, Dead Pool is mandatory reading for anyone concerned about the future of the West.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Historyreader on July 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is an important subject that deserves a better examination. The book gets off to an interesting start with an aborbing account of the 1983 flood and its effect on Glen Canyon dam. The middle section is an overly long recount of the dreary history of pork barrel water projects in the West.

The final section looks to the future with predictions of water shortages, mainly due to global warming. This where the book falls short, not necessarily
on the global warming subject, but on what happens next. And the author doesn't really address that. He only gives a sentence or two to the obvious outcome, and that is the cities buying out the farmers' water interest. With something like 70% of the water going to mostly low value farm crops, when shortages get severe the economic and political power of the cities will re-direct the water from crops to people. And an examination of practical water
conservation is also omitted. These are the untold stories that are missing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stuart Sutton on June 13, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you read Cadillac Desert, and have a grasp of global warming, this book doesn't really offer much new. That said, this book is better for those with interest in the subject if you haven't read either one of these. It adequately covers most of the high points with a few minor added issues.
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By Percy Dovetonsils on February 5, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Clearly, the end of the Southwest, as we know it, is at hand. Greed and bureaucracy partnered to pull the wagon of folly to it's ultimate conclusion - the near future abandonment of Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Powell at the additional cost of yet to be calculated billions of dollars to the American taxpayer. The welfare queens captured headlines while the welfare agriculturists had a free ride complements of free water paid for by the American taxpayer, yet little of their story was ever told until now.
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