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The Dead Saint (Bishop Lynn Peterson) Paperback – April 1, 2011


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The Dead Saint (Bishop Lynn Peterson) + Crested Butte : A Novel
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Product Details

  • Series: Bishop Lynn Peterson
  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Abingdon Press (April 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 142670867X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1426708671
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,726,756 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Bishop Lynn Peterson starts her Wednesday sipping coffee in the French Quarter when whizzing bullets and a dead New Orleans Saints kicker send her on a worldwide journey of espionage, secret messages, and life-threatening situations. The peace-loving bishop is pitted against a mysterious enemy known as "The Patriot," whose reach and power extend even to still restive postsiege Sarajevo. "Start with St. Sava" is Lynn's first clue that her life might no longer be solely under her own command. Oden (Crested Butte) has written an international adventure that will keep readers guessing, though her propensity to halt action with Lynn's self-talk and introspection (" âÇÿEnough, Lynn! Open the letter or tear it up!' ") can get annoying. The casual yet taut style will keep readers turning pages to find out if Bishop Lynn can prevent disaster that involves the highest echelons of the U.S. government. Oden's Bishop Lynn is likable and smart, a combination that could make for a bestseller and more thrillers in the future. (Apr.)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

About the Author

Marilyn Brown Oden is the award-winning author of ten previous books, including Crested Butte: A Novel. She enjoys good times with family and friends, walks to the Santa Fe Plaza, and cross-country skiing in the moonlight. Her life is enriched through experiences on five continents with diverse people—refugees, Gypsies, the physically challenged, women in prison, prime ministers, royalty, and presidents. Two encounters reshaped her worldview: visiting refugee centers in the war zones of Bosnia-Herzegovina during the NATO bombing and participating in an ecumenical fact-finding delegation to Israel/Palestine. Writing continues to bring her meaning and a sense of wholeness. She is a United Methodist and lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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Customer Reviews

I could not put the book down until I finished it--at 3:30 AM!!
Marilyn Ogilvie
Book got a little like a bad Seinfeld episode at the end where too many things come together at the end and it seems a bit forced.
Joel M. Ungar
Kept me on the edge of my seat, unexpected twists and turns, very well thought-out story.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

67 of 72 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
I wasn't sure what to expect- I hadn't read one of her books before and I wasn't sure it would be my cup of tea. But from the first few pages, this book caught my interest, and it got more intense and suspenseful as it went. The characters felt real and alive to me (especially the protagonist, Lynn Peterson), and that made the precarious situations feel like they matter. I usually take a week or so to read a novel, but once in a while I really don't want to put a book down, and this was one of those. (Finished it in two days). I little longer than most books I read, but it didn't feel long. I would recommend it as a thinking person's thriller.
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96 of 110 people found the following review helpful By Debbie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
"The Dead Saint" is a political thriller with an anti-war theme. Unfortunately, there's an excess of unnecessary detail that slowed the pace. There were whole scenes that could have been cut and the reader wouldn't have missed them. However, some suspense was created by physical danger to various nice people.

The main characters were interesting. However, the majority of the characters were described in an idealized way or were cliche. Lynn and her husband also seemed too naive and hero-worshiping for their given backgrounds. Lynn also seemed to have a mental illness--something like a split personality--which just struck me as weird. However, she did act intelligently, though realistically, to the unexpectedly dangerous situations she was in.

Though Lynn visited several foreign countries, I didn't get a vivid mental image of the settings or a real feel for the cultures. We got descriptions of a few tourist spots and a generic "war-zone neighborhood." They felt like descriptions you could get off of photographs, though you could tell the author has been through foreign airports.

Lynn was an episcopal bishop whose focus was on social activism for peace and to help the poor. Her theology seemed to consist of frequent centering to find peace, removing "sin" from her vocabulary because it led to feeling guilty, and an occasional prayer to become a better person. She also talked with others about the similarities between religions and how she thinks they're all reaching toward the same God and same goal of self-transformation.

I don't recall any bad language. There was no sex. Overall, the novel wasn't bad, it just wasn't as exciting and engaging as I'd expect of such a plot.

I received a review copy of this book from the publisher.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Steve on October 16, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While the plot for this book was acceptable, the writing was (as this author might describe it) like an overproduced orchestration of Mary Had A Little Lamb. Unnecessary words and repetitious descriptions abound - again and again and again. Similes and metaphors (mostly ridiculous ones) are two or more to a page. There is nothing wrong with the author's underlying writing ability, someone just needs to help her tell the story and leave a lot more of the descriptive elements and emotional tugs to the reader's imagination (at one point the main character's love for her husband "welled up" twice on one page!). It was a struggle to finish this book and the only way I did was to skip whole pages and read only those related to plot movement.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Brian Alford on November 1, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Quite simply, this book is difficult to enjoy. The basic premise is intriguing; however, the execution is terribly substandard. The main characters are very 2 dimensional. The book is majority fluff - you'll find yourself wondering what type of editor would allow this much unnecessary verbiage into the final copy.

The worst part, for me, was how preachy and repetitive the book becomes after the first couple of chapters. The protagonist, Lynn, is extremely anti-war. Lynn loves her husband and feels it is the most perfect marriage in the history of mankind. Lynn misses her daughter. Okay, that is fine and dandy, but WE GET IT! There is no need to repeat this ad nauseam throughout nearly every chapter. Sometimes many times per chapter or even on the same page!

I bought this as a Kindle daily deal, so my expectations were already relatively low. Sadly, this novel fell short even of those.
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46 of 55 people found the following review helpful By JOHN KILLINGER on May 14, 2011
Format: Paperback
Move over, Robert Ludlum, Frederick Forsyth, and Tom Clancy! Here's a woman writer who outclasses all of you in this scintillating novel about forces bent on destroying the world and everything that's good in it. She writes with an uncanny sense of the great duality informing every novel of true terror and suspense, and yet, at the same time, with an underlying confidence in the sustaining power of a God of love and community. Don't start reading this novel when you have something else to do, for you won't be able to put it down until you have read all 473 pages!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Fran on October 13, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The prime character is presented as an educated and well connected person. In the beginning she acts like an idiot. It is like reading a term paper that requires a minimum number of words. The text is padded with meaningless verbage. One of the worst books I have ever tried to read
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Philip V. McCalister on June 20, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading Marilyn Brown Oden's mystery after I got past the glaring mistake which shows the value of reliable editing. The other reviewers have compared Ms. Oden's writing to certain stalwarts of modern American political suspense fiction who get their facts straight with amazing and revealing accuracy. That didn't happen here. Competent editors should have caught these distractions. Had they, this novel would have been fine indeed.

Early on, Ms. Oden introduces "Major Marsh Manetti, U.S. Navy" to the story. From that point forward every time the writer refers to "Major Manetti" I winced. To be correct he would be "Lieutenant Commander Manneti, U.S. Navy." Then, there was the lack of familiarity with the basic security procedures of the Secret Service detail protecting a U.S. president. Even an old Clint Eastwood movie was closer to commonly known procedures that would have made the final chapters very unlikely. I don't expect every author to be expert in the details, but one does expect the editors to follow up on these matters.

I loved the positive faith based approach to the characters and found that development highly believable. Even the dark path of the villains read true. What disappointed me was the grossly inaccurate criticism of the current U.S. Military in an attempt to take a shot at George W. Bush and his war in Iraq. First, I must say that Ms. Oden and I probably agree on the foolhardiness of that war and the shameful waste of human life and resources, but to characterize the U.S. Military as "expendable, generally just minorities and the poor - rarely the sons and daughters of those who run the country," is just untrue and disrespectful of the U.S.
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