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Deadly Consequences Paperback – February 4, 1993

3.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero
"In the Country We Love" by Diane Guerrero
A moving, heartbreaking story of one woman's extraordinary resilience in the face of the nightmarish struggles of undocumented residents in this country. Learn more
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (February 4, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060924020
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060924027
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #796,864 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

This book boldly addresses the issues of adolescent violence - the causes and possible solutions to this ever-growing problem in American society. Sadly, the violence is becoming even more ever-present through the continuation of violence in the media, video games, and an overall attitude of insensitivity to human life. Our society is suffering as consequence. This book gives us something to seriously consider in rethinking how we view violence in our society and the issue of teenage violence as a public health concern.
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This book not only clearly elucidates a growing problem but gives great ideas for being active in addressing the issues. It is both sobering and empowering.
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By A Customer on January 18, 2004
This book illustrates a flawed understanding of youth violence in the inner cities. The solution of making violence a public health issue works (ONLY on paper) and the concept of "community policing" is nothing new. Prothrow-Stith fails to mention the Senior Lead Officer, which is an important piece of this concept. There is a strong anti-police overtone throughout the book. I am certain this comes from the criminals the author has bonded with in the ER room. Too bad she hasn't walked the thin blue line and seen first hand the damage these criminals cause to their victims and society as a whole. Rather than demand they take responsibility for their actions, this book places blame elsewhere.
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