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Deadly Deceit: Low-Level Radiation High-Level Cover-Up Paperback – April, 1991


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: Thunder's Mouth Pr; 2nd edition (April 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0941423565
  • ISBN-13: 978-0941423564
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #197,900 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 26, 2001
My only complaint about the book, as with other books of its type, is its heavy dose of statistical information--which is also its strength, but makes for dull reading at times. Otherwise, it's an important addition to the current literature.
In response to other reviewers...to the Washington D.C. nuclear plant worker (are there any nuclear plants in D.C.?) who claims that "Many studies have been done, and there is currently a very large body of knowledge on the subject of real (what insurance companies consider) vs perceived (what trial lawyers consider) risks." Well, since there are NO insurance companies on the planet that are willing to underwrite liability for nuclear power plants, hence the reason for the Price-Anderson Act, your comment is a bit disingenuous, at best. As for nuclear power being safe, well, even Paul O'Neill, the current Treasury Secretary and a staunch supporter of nuclear power, by his own admission considers TMI and Chernobyl to be egregious exceptions to the nuclear industry's safety records. Over 15,000 lawsuits by leukemia victims and their families hardly serve as a vindication of Three Mile Island. And let's not forget the partial meldown in Savannah, by the way. We can talk about cost rather than safety: at $3000-$4000 per kilowatt hour nuclear power is hardly cost-effective, given the current costs of $3-$4 per kilowatt hour by using natural gas. Not to mention the problem of waste disposal.
To Tim Steadham from Virginia, in a follow-up volume entitled "The Enemy Within," the National Cancer Institute's statistics and methodology confirm Dr. Gould's--the same methodology used in THIS book--showing that breast cancer rates in areas surrounding nuclear power plants are as much as +30% higher than the national average.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Maria on April 26, 2012
I recommend this to everybody who concerns about their health but especially to Americans and Japanese. It contains enough data to alarm any nuclear fallout danger skeptics. Must read.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 2000
These authors write a concise and densely packed book. They base much of their information on published mortality rates, radiation levels measured in milk, the timing of nuclear incidents (and their location) to tell a story of the dangers of low-level radiation. The large numbers involved make the statistics convincing. The authors have done a good job explaining the statistics, documenting their sources, and they have stated repeatedly that correlations do not prove cause and effect relationships, so I do beleive this is bad, paranoia inducing journalism. The authors do speculate on some topics, but in general the book seems solid (although I have not checked out their references). I think the book could have benefitted by better graphical presentation of the data.
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