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Dealing with Addition Paperback – February 1, 1998


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Charlesbridge (February 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881062707
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881062700
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #695,193 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1-3-A wonderful tool that uses playing cards to teach the addition of whole numbers. More fun and versatile than counting macaroni or dominos (see Long's Domino Addition [Charlesbridge, 1996]), cards also offer a natural introduction to many games. The author clearly outlines the elements of the deck, illustrating and naming the suits and face cards. She then explains different ways to group them: by color, suit, or number and how to add their values to reach a specific total. With this firmly established, Long asks readers to try the same for the numbers 1 through 10. For example, the page that explores the possible combinations for 8 depicts a group of 9 cards of various suits, denominations, and colors, while the text reads "There are eight different ways to get EIGHT with these cards. Pick out all eight of them." The answers are shown on the next page through pictures of the cards with the numeral equations below them. A table of the combinations and the game "Dealing with Addition" conclude the book. Large print and clear full-color illustrations on black or red pages enhance the text. The simplicity, clarity, and potential of this title as a springboard for other mathematically based games makes it a perfect choice for any elementary or public library collection.
Nancy A. Gifford, Schenectady County Public Library, NY
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"A wonderful tool that uses playing cards to teach the addition of whole numbers." -- School Library Journal, September 1998

This book gives a clear, illustrated introduction to the basic mechanics of a deck of cards-how to identify suits and numbers and different ways to sort cards, by color, number, or suit. It then goes on to point out how addition problems can be created with the use of cards. A separate page is dedicated to each number, one through ten. Using a displayed group of cards, the reader is asked to find ways to combine these cards to add up to the featured number. It takes just the turn of the page to find the answers. Even though this exercise is initially exciting, the repetition of the experience gets a bit redundant, at least in book form. Children just learning math may be enthralled by the process described but it's questionable as to how often they'd refer to the book once the concept is grasped. One plus to the book is that it's visually attractive. Appropriate colors combine to create a dynamic presentation with the white card against an alternating background of black or red. The look is sharp and snappy. Another plus is the card game described at the end that uses the adding strategies featured in the book. I played this game with my seven year old who found it both challenging and fun. -- From Independent Publisher --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Lynette Long has an M.S. in mathematics and a Ph.D. in psychology. She has taught math and was a professor of education, specializing in mathematics education. She is the author of several children's math books, including Dazzling Division and Marvelous Multiplication, both published by Wiley.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David F. Pocai on February 20, 2008
Format: Paperback
We desperately needed a new game to replace Sum Swamp for practicing Addition facts. So I purchased this book to learn how to play dealing with addition.
I'm so happy we did! Now we can practice addition facts to 13 (If you include jacks, queens and kings as the extra numbers). My DD loves this game, though we rarely look at the book anymore (that's why I only gave it 3 stars).
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By K. Rizk on October 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
Dealing with Addition takes the fun of playing cards and teaches addition. Long lays out an entire deck of cards around her pages and explains how they can be categorized by color, shape and number. Her clear, concise explanations allows the young reader to understand the many functions of playing cards and learn addition at the same time. As she lays out different sets of cards she demonstrates how to add the cards together to reach the numbers from 1 to 10. At the end of the book, she introduces the reader to a card game, "Dealing with Addition." This book is best read with a deck of playing cards nearby, as the young reader will undoubtedly want to try their hand at manipulating the cards.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Meg on December 1, 2008
Format: Paperback
Children love cards and this book creates interesting ways to use cards in learning addition!
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