Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on April 24, 2001
Louis Armstrong is one of our greatest jazz Patriarchs whose impact has had such a tremendous effect on jazz music today. How do you pay just tribute to the king? Louis would be proud of Nicholas Payton's stellar effort. What makes this recording special is the fact that the essence of Armstrong is maintained but it is executed with Payton's unique vision. In this setting we find Payton in new territory to most listeners. We know that he's one of todays most accomplished trumpeters. His last few recordings with his working band have been fantastic. Now we get to hear Nick in the context of a big band. He also showcases his vocal skills on a few cuts. He can sing? Yes he can. He's no Satchmo, but he brings an authenticity to the cuts that he's chosen. The other vocalists Dr. John and Dianne Reeves are superb. Everything works together with Payton's arrangements. All the musicians are excellent. The big band setting is outstanding. Horn arrangements, percussion, come together to show the many sides of the great Armstrong. And it's all done in the fresh voice of Nicholas Payton; a modern jazz trumpeter. I didn't know Hello Dolly could be so smooth and funky.
Check it out for yourself.
markT.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 26, 2001
Alright. A few people who have listened to this have hated it. I'm going to go in the opposite direction. As far as a tribute album, it's not. I really don't think there's an argument there...Unless the point is that Louis wrote timeless tunes that transcend all styles and periods. But we all know that. To me, this is just some good jazz music, heavy on the bop. But more Big Band Dizzy bop than intellectual Parker bop. But on top of everything else, the melody, and the arraingments, are fine work. Commendable for sure. True, Nick Payton probably shouldn't try the singing thing for a while, but it doesn't overshadow the artistry here. One thing that Payton really does do well is unforced cool. Important for good jazz. Read up on some Machiavelli to understand that. But it doesn't mean anything in the end. The music is there, and that's it. Don't hate the man for being musical.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
What a fine trumpet outing this is! Native New Orleans son Nicholas Payton plays classic songs associated with that other native son, Louis Armstrong, and he does them with proficiency, a modern spin, and a cool sensibility. Considering that Armstrong himself played with a variety of musicians, including Oscar Peterson (no trad-jazz player *he*) and no less than that artiste supreme, Duke Ellington (give a listen to The Great Summit: The Master Tapes), I seriously doubt that Louis would have any problems with Payton's take on these tunes. In fact, I rather expect Louis would be proud: he had a big blues streak that worked its way down toward the cooler, near-bop side of jazz now and then (if you don't think so, then you'd better listen to him and Peterson doing Blues In The Night on Louis Armstrong Meets Oscar Peterson, on Verve; in fact, most of that album is far from trad-jazz).

The folks here who are upset that these standards aren't played by Payton as traditional jazz are clueless: jazz musicians ARE NOT OBLIGATED to forever play them as traditional jazz. It's been a century since King Oliver and Kid Ory began playing what's now considered traditional jazz; how much longer are those tunes supposed to stay petrified in a single genre? Answer: they were ***never*** supposed to be played in a fixed format or idiom: improvisation and variation isn't just the backbone of jazz, it's the entire point!! Miss that, and you completely misunderstand jazz's reason for being.

Back to Payton: Potato Head Blues and Tight Like This are most clearly 1950s Miles-ish cool-school bop and sound fresh. I like the way Payton plays with time signatures and strange chords, as in Hello, Dolly (a tune that I otherwise can't stand, despite Armstrong's listener-friendly version). You Rascal You gets a bluesy big-band-style take that sounds like it could have been done by the funky, swinging Gene Harris. Dianne Reeves does the sweet vocal on a Chick-Corea-Return-To-Forever-influenced On The Sunny Side Of The Street. Blues In The Night hearkens back to that Armstrong-Peterson arrangement and to New Orleans R&B with a fine vocal by Dr. John, whereas The Peanut Vendor shows influences of Dizzy, Arturo Sandoval, Tito Puente, and the Caribbean Jazz Project. And yes, Mack The Knife *is* Louis filtered through Miles Davis, but that's a good thing and it swings, improving an otherwise severely hackneyed tune that I never did like unless Ella was scatting through it. Tiger Rag is a second-line brass romp in Dirty Dozen style (how come you trad-jazz critics didn't catch that? What could be more traditional than a New Orleans second line??), whereas I'll Never Be The Same is rendered as a samba worthy of Stan Getz and friends. And West End Blues gets my favorite treatment, morphing into a swinging, eight-count Lindy borrowed from big band and just made for dancing. What is there not to like?? Absolutely nothing!!! Stretch your ears and get this: if you really love jazz as a whole and not just its early roots, this will grow on you.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
This is one of the finest albums released yet by the incredible Nicholas Payton. Born and raised in New Orleans, this album features the infinitely talented trumpeter in his element, with a band full of tonal variety, dynamic quality, and a damn good lead trumpet player, playing re-interpretations of Louis Armstrong classics. If u like the trumpet, Louis Armstrong, or just the general concept of a swingin' Big Band, then this is for you. Nicholas Payton boasts a fine set of weapons: impressive range, a really fat sound, a solid concept of rhythm, and the flexibility to change his sound depending on the style of the music. Highly influenced by Clifford Brown and Louis Armstrong, Payton utilises everything he's got to really set the listeners ears on fire. Growl on!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 9, 2001
When I first heard this cd, I thought, this has nothing to do with Louis Armstrong! Of course, some of Mr. Armstrong's signature pieces are covered on this cd. A second, and third, listen, however, had me appreciating Mr. Payton's beautiful playing. He has really developed his own style, and yet, one can hear the sounds and feel of New Orleans jazz coming through on each piece. A beautiful and loving tribute to Satchmo, but in Payton's own voice. A worthy cd to own for serious jazz lovers.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on August 13, 2001
Nick Payton is one of the greatest trumpet players in recent years. Whether you like his musical decisions or not, his mastery of the instrument is undeniable. Now we see that his arranging skills are equally strong. His chart for Hello Dolly is one of the most exciting big band arrangements I've ever heard. Although his style is more directly influenced by Miles and Freddie Hubbard, Nick treats the Armstrong material wonderfully. A fun album to listen to, all around (Even his singing!)
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 6, 2002
It should come as no suprise that Nicholas Payton's most recent CD, "Dear Louis," has garnered him yet another well-deserved Grammy nomination. The title track, "Dear Louis," plus "Tight Like This" and the Cuban classic, "Peanut Vendor," are by far three of the best tracks on this amazing CD. Not only does Payton demonstrate a flair for composing his own works, but he also does a masterful job of arranging a number of Louis Armstrong favorites. If Louis Armstrong were alive today, I'm convinced he, too, would hold this CD is the highest regard. So, make "Dear Louis" an essential addition to your jazz CD collection--it's a winner.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on September 8, 2001
The CD is great. I've listened to it several times and I can't find anything wrong with it. The band is exciting and Nicholas' arrangements are great. I guess those who don't like the CD, don't really like big band jazz. I do have to say that the CD doesn't do the band justice. Again, the CD is great, but the band is AWESOME in concert. If you like this CD, you'll love them live.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on May 5, 2001
Nicholas Payton is a very talented young artist and this CD will not disappoint. However, it should be titled "Dear Miles," since Payton's style owes far more to Miles Davis than to Satchmo.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on May 29, 2001
Nicholas Payton, does an EXCELLENT rendition of Louis Armstrong and if you get a chance, SEE THEM IN CONCERT!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
#BAM Live at Bohemian Caverns
#BAM Live at Bohemian Caverns by Nicholas Payton (Audio CD - 2013)

Numbers
Numbers by Nicholas Payton (Audio CD - 2014)

Into the Blue
Into the Blue by Nicholas Payton (Audio CD - 2008)
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.