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Dear Lupin: Letters to a Wayward Son Hardcover – October 1, 2013

4.4 out of 5 stars 17 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

“As well as being the funniest book I've read in ages, it's also extremely touching. A delight.” ―The Spectator

“By turns exasperated, affectionate, touching and wry, the letters brim with a father's love for his son. An absolute delight.” ―Daily Mail

“Makes you cry as well as laugh.” ―Daily Telegraph

“Very, very funny.” ―Sunday Times

“This idiosyncratic collection from a father to his errant son is a delight.” ―Telegraph

“Witty and affectionate.” ―Tatler

About the Author

ROGER MORTIMER was commissioned into the British Army in 1930. He fought in Dunkirk in 1940 and was taken as a POW for the remainder of the war. After resigning from the army in 1947, he became a racing correspondent for The Sunday Times, where he worked for thirty years. He and his wife, Cynthia, had two daughters, Jane and Louise, and one son, CHARLIE MORTIMER, who is the co-writer for Dear Lupin.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books (October 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1250038510
  • ISBN-13: 978-1250038517
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,439,415 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Roger Mortimer's letters to his son, Charlie, written over a period of twenty five years, are full of gems such as "In those happy days we had a chauffeur called Percy Samuel Woods who committed suicide by lying face downwards in a large puddle. Talk about doing things the hard way!" or "Unfortunately I am rapidly becoming senile and my general health is deteriorating rather fast. Old age is full of surprises, most of them unpleasant, and is rather like being punished for a crime one has never committed".

Always supportive, even when disapproving of his wild child, Roger Mortimer's intelligence, literacy and profound love for his son shine out from this delightful collection of letters.

This would make a wonderful present for anyone with an interest in family relationships, a sense of humour or a soft spot for the Pooter family.
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Absolutely marvellous. A cross between PG Wodehouse and the obituaries of colourful military men. The novel is epistolary - letters from Roger Mortimer to his son Charles. Charles is a reprobate , but the affection his father has for him, his tolerance, his irony, his humour and his love are palpable. It is just so funny, and Roger is a lovely man.
it also gives us an inkling of upper middle class society in the 50's.
I am going to recommend it to all my friends. i loved it.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
lordy lord, would that americans would be infected by the plague of common sense, wit, flippancy and directness of the most lovely and mad of isles, England. This book proves, rather conclusively, that the world would be more pleasant if the baby boomers had listened to and obeyed their parents. huzzah for the WW2 generation with its silence, smoking, drinking and general carrying on. no hugs just get on with.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I read the majority of this book on flights back and forth across the Atlantic, and it proved to be perfect entertainment. I tried to watch the in-flight movies, but this Dear Lupin was much more satisfactory as a source of enjoyable amusement. I was still able to listen to the jazz channel in the background.

As the description says, this is a book of letters from a father to his son. The father despairs for the destiny, or lack of it, of his wayward son. It is unlikely that any of his advice will ever sink in. Nevertheless, he perseveres, and gives it anyway. The interspersion of comments from the recipient make it even clearer that the paternal advice will never have a positive effect.

Lupin believes that his family are middle class, but they are definitely towards the upper end of middle class, straying into upper class. The circles in which they mix are certainly in the upper echelons of English society.

What made this book even more interesting for me was that I have lived, on and off, in the area of most of the events for the past 35 years, so I know all of the places very well.

Without spoiling the read for you, I conclude this review with some amusing tidbits that I highlighted on my way through. I hope that they tempt you into reading the whole book.

(A comment from the son which is tacked to a letter that he received when he was in hospital)
- My mother (sometimes known as the Bureau of Misinformation) is desperately worried and following my liver biopsy calls a distant cousin who is a doctor for advice: `I'm most frightfully worried about my son Charles, they've just done an autopsy on him.'

- For some reason or other I got on the wrong train at Waterloo but luckily I quite like Bournemouth.
Read more ›
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By P. Cheslaw on September 4, 2013
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Enjoyable and recommended. A reflection on an English characters relationship to the world and too his son. Very entertaining. Try it.
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Very funny book. Would be appreciated by older men with sons. Great commentary on the joys of getting older too.
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The book was recommended by a friend who enjoyed the read enormously. I could relate well to the content, especially to the wayward son as I have known many similar young men. The upside is the communication between father and son with its fatherly advice aligned to a familiarity with the son's behaviour. As with Dear Lumpy, I was confused by the number of people referred to in the book and the need to keep looking back to see the connection. I am not sure that I would have chosen it as a holiday read without the recommendation.
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Mortimer's letter collection from his father was entertaining, but ultimately too one-sided and repetitive to tell a story of a father and son.
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