Dear Mr. Gacy R CC

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(53) IMDb 6.5/10
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In 1980, John Wayne Gacy (William Forsythe of THE DEVIL'S REJECTS) was convicted of the rape and murder of 33 boys and young men - many of whom he buried beneath his suburban Chicago home - and sentenced to death row. Thirteen years later, ambitious criminology student Jason Moss (Jesse Moss of UNINVITED) began a bizarre correspondence with the serial killer by posing as a vulnerable gay teen. What followed was a nightmare journey into a world of violence, madness and sexual depravity that brought home the true horror of Gacy's crimes. Hailed by Maxim as a "true-life Silence of the Lambs," Dear Mr. Gacy is a chilling true story based on the best seller that detailed an 18-year-old's terrifying relationship with the most notorious mass murderer in American history.

Starring:
William Forsythe, Jesse Moss
Runtime:
1 hour 44 minutes

Dear Mr. Gacy

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Svetozar Ristovski
Starring William Forsythe, Jesse Moss
Supporting actors Emma Lahana, Cole Heppell, Belinda Metz, Michael Ryan, Eric Keenleyside, Daryl Shuttleworth, Patrick Gilmore, Andrew Airlie, Michael Kopsa, Jeffrey Bowyer-Chapman, Hunter Elliott, Michaela Mann, Dee Jay Jackson, Libby Osler, Brett Dier, James Ralph, Jaren Brandt Bartlett, Lynn Colliar
Studio Anchor Bay Entertainment
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

As far as movies go, I did like this. i did not feel great about ownership, mind you, but the watch was good.
TorridlyBoredShopper
DEAR MR. GACY details the true-life experiences shared between Jason Moss and his subject of study, John Wayne Gacy, as adapted from his memoirs The Last Victim.
Carl Manes
And that makes it all the more terrifying without the film resorting to showing the events of the history of one of the most serious serial killers in history.
Grady Harp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

42 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Ricketts on December 12, 2010
Format: DVD
I honestly can't even remember the amount of movies made about various serial killers over the years and there has many numerous about John Wayne Gacy himself as well so going into this I wasn't expecting any new or different here but boy was I wrong. Based on a true story, the film tells the tale of college student, Jason Moss who decided to contact Mr. Gacy during his final year alive and try to find out things about no one else including the F.B.I. could get plus his was the subject John was using as his final term paper for school so he does have a motive. Early on I have to say I found Jason's fascination with Gacy a bit creepy and never having the read the book I was interested in finding out what was inside the head of the young man as well. The first letter he writes to John is one that paints a picture of a tough home life, of someone looking to reach out as a friend. After seeing an interview on Television where John states he is bi-sexual Jason takes the next step by posing and taking seductive pictures to send along in the next letter to John. Based on the book "The Last Victim" written by Jason Moss it paints a picture of someone looking to get into the head of Mr. Gacy but as the relationship moves along you quickly find out that John is a master and Jason is really no match. Jason slowly begins to journey now a dark path of destruction that effects his relationship with both his family and his girlfriend as John gets deeper and deeper in his subconscious. To go on and on about the story here would only ruin the experience for those waiting to see the film but I can say this is a dark, disturbing and and almost hypnotic look into the mind of a crazed killer, like Mr. Gacy himself the film gets in your head and stays with you long after it is over.Read more ›
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Carl Manes on December 2, 2010
Format: DVD
A young psychology student begins corresponding with John Wayne Gacy, the famed serial killer, posing as a potential victim in order to write a groundbreaking thesis paper on the case. After exchanging letters and speaking on the phone, Jason thinks he has the upper hand in the situation, but Gacy quickly proves that he is more cunning than he appears as he infiltrates every aspect of Jason's life and infects his mind. Intense, nauseating, terrifying. DEAR MR. GACY details the true-life experiences shared between Jason Moss and his subject of study, John Wayne Gacy, as adapted from his memoirs The Last Victim. The film is a refreshing new approach to the tired serial killer theme, and one that is made that much more frightening in the fact that it was Moss' reality for seven months. William Forsythe is both captivating and repulsive at the same time as the incarcerated "Killer Clown." His powers of persuasion and seemingly innocent charm lure the audience in just as the real Gacy had done with his victims. The one fatal flaw that makes the story so difficult to believe is that the resourceful Gacy had the ability to track down so many details about Moss' life, and yet he was unable to figure out that Jason was a college student that was playing him from the start. With the suspension of disbelief held high, DEAR MR. GACY proves to be an intimate and unsettling examination into the inner workings of one of America's most notorious murders.

-Carl Manes
I Like Horror Movies
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By adiadv on December 23, 2010
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Wow ... I was blown away. I remember watching the news coverage shown in this film as it actually happened - when Gacy was arrested and the gruesome discoveries that followed. The nation was appalled, terrified and morbidly fascinated by the undeniable proof that there is a dark side to some seemingly everyday people that is successfully hidden away by their ability to fit in with society.

I've also seen several crime documentaries about Jason Moss' experience studying Gacy. It's disturbing and unsettling to know that there are people who seem to have mastered the ability to manipulate and terrorize someone to the point of controlling them psychologically. Getting inside the mind of someone like that would be a life-changing and horrible thing to deal with. I hate to imagine what it's like as a detective, profiler, psychologist or worst of all - a victim - to realize that you are dealing with a person that is consumed by violence, narcissism and a lust for total control with no regard for human life - including yours.

William Forsythe was every bit as formidable and convincing as Anthony Hopkins in Silence of the Lambs ... two characters that are mesmerizing and terrifying because of the destructive use of their intelligence and the ability to gain people's trust in order to dominate them. But in this film I find it to be especially disturbing because from what I've seen and read it's (for the most part) what I consider to be an accurate portrayal of an actual, horrible event in history.

Be sure to read "the rest of the story" right before the credits. For me it really drove home the point that the impact a sick mind can achieve if they gain control is a powerful thing that can result in a multitude of damaging, violent and deadly consequences - way beyond what is obvious.
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Format: DVD
Direct-to-DVD movies about serial killers are so common that it's almost revolutionary when one is given the slightest bit of positive notice. I caught the trailer for Dear Mr. Gacy in a store, was slightly intrigued, and became very interested when I found mostly positive reviews. The film is based on a book I'd never heard of by Jason Moss, who developed a correspondence with serial killer John Wayne Gacy in the months leading up to his execution. Gacy died in 1994, Moss' book was published in 1999, and Moss took his own life in 2006. The book was called The Last Victim and with the knowledge of his suicide and lack of explanation for it, a whole new dimension is added to the film.

I don't know how closely this film follows the book, so the following review is based solely on the film's own merit.

In the film, Jason Moss (coincidentally played by an actor named Jesse Moss) decides to write his college thesis on serial killers. Posing as a troubled admirer, he sends a letter to convicted serial killer John Wayne Gacy (William Forsythe). To his surprise, Gacy responds to it. Doing whatever he can to gain Gacy's trust and get access to the darkest parts of his mind, Moss develops a frighteningly close bond with Gacy that begins taking a toll on his real life.

It's troubling that Dear Mr. Gacy debuted on Canadian television and was followed with a direct-to-DVD release. Films released this way are rarely of high-quality and many people see a direct-to-DVD release as a badge of mediocrity. This is not the case with Dear Mr. Gacy. What we have here is a film that is not a horror film, but gets under your skin more effectively than any theatrically-released horror film that I can recall being released in 2010.
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