Dear Teen Me: Authors Write Letters to Their Teen Selves and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$10.95
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $4.04 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Dear Teen Me: Authors Wri... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Dear Teen Me: Authors Write Letters to Their Teen Selves (True Stories) Paperback – October 30, 2012


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.95
$1.68 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime

Frequently Bought Together

Dear Teen Me: Authors Write Letters to Their Teen Selves (True Stories) + Marcelo In The Real World
Price for both: $18.30

Buy the selected items together
  • Marcelo In The Real World $7.35

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 880L (What's this?)
  • Series: True Stories
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Zest Books; Original edition (October 30, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936976218
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936976218
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #438,053 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A Look Inside Dear Teen Me

From School Library Journal

Gr 6 Up-Fact: The teenage experience doesn't play out like it does in the movies. Stripped of its Hollywood gloss and thrown into harsh reality, it is a daily gauntlet of angst and anxiety and trial, but also of hard-won triumph. Here, in letters to their former teen selves, more than 60 young adult authors discuss friendship, first love, body image, abuse, depression, glory days, horror days, and how the experiences they had as teenagers helped shape them into the (mostly) well-adjusted adults they grew to be. These letters range from humorous to heartbreaking, and teens past, present, and future will find something they can relate to. Julia Whelan and Macleod Andrews do an admirable of job narrating the various letters (Zest Books, 2012) by authors such as Beth Fantaskey, Carrie Jones, Joseph Bruchac, Ilse Bick, and a host of others. The concept is creative, and listeners will love getting to know their favorite YA authors better. Unfortunately, the discs consistently end mid-letter, giving the recording a choppy, interrupted feel. Additionally, graphic segments don't translate well into audio format. This makes a nice supplement to the print version, but is not a necessary purchase. For additional letters, visit dearteenme.com.-Alissa Bach, Oxford Public Library, MIα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.


Related Media

 
   

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
12
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
1
See all 34 customer reviews
This is a book that I read over a month or so.
Candace Robinson
In Dear Teen Me, a collection of letters from the authors to their teen selves, you will get a glimpse of just how much they can connect to the teens they write for.
OpheliasOwn
Whatever it was, I only know that the book exceeded my expectations.
Gretchen @ My Life is a Notebook

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Gretchen @ My Life is a Notebook on October 30, 2012
Format: Paperback
Thank you to Zest Books for this ARC! Read more at My Life is a Notebook or [...].

You may notice that this book has no rating. Certainly it will have to have one on Amazon, Goodreads and the like because they demand it, but Dear Teen Me is, to me, a book that transcends ratings.

What is a rating, anyways? It is a mark of sometimes good technical storytelling, other times it is because of a person's simple like or dislike of a book. With Dear Teen Me, the former aspect especially holds no place.

Dear Teen Me is not a story. It is a conglomeration of personal, nonfiction stories about the teen years of dozens of YA authors. The concepts of "good technical storytelling" do not apply. The content is just not that kind.

I don't know what I thought when I requested an ARC of this book. Whatever it was, I only know that the book exceeded my expectations. I was certainly expecting a great deal of "Were you an outsider in high school, because it's okay to be weird!" and I got that, but not one of these stories was cheesy. Not one was a cliché of an adult trying to empower a teenager. The topics that these authors went over ranged from self-harm and eating disorders to coming out and dealing with abusive parents--and everything in between. Yes, every story had a happy ending and a moral, but you never felt like you were being told. All of the letters--though in some more than others--I felt as if I was intruding on someone's most personal journal entry, and the that raw emotion on display was not for my eyes.

Dear Teen Me was not a book that I may have picked up of my own volition, simply because I am tired of books where "former teens" share their inspiring stories and tell you how to learn from them.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mary Bookhounds VINE VOICE on October 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is a collection letters written by popular young adult authors to themselves as teens to tell them that essentially, life does get better. Well, in some cases, it does get way worse than better, but eventually, things do look up. There are all kinds of confessions involved here, some of my favorite authors have dealt with illness, abuse and more adversaries that make my life look like a fairy tale. Most have been threatened by bullies, a lot have had family members die, suffer from drug abuse or even worse.

I had no idea that these authors had to deal with these situations while growing up. It is amazing that some survived at all and a lot of them have incorporated their experiences into their work. It is truly eye opening. Some of my favorites were from Carrie Jones where she explains that a horrible encounter with a boy ended with her having epilepsy. The letter from Ilsa Bick was heart rendering as she talks about her father who was the only survivor of a Nazi death camp. There are also a few lighthearted moments where authors name their celebrity crushes. I wish I would have found the tumblr site for this book before it was released. I am going to send it to every teen I know.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Beverly L. Archer VINE VOICE on January 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a great concept, but it wasn't quite what I expected. I thought it would be more of an advice type book. Rather it really is an insider conversation between the writers as adults and their teen selves. I think that teen readers will enjoy getting a peek into the history of some of their favorite writers. It would be an interesting tool to use for a high school writing class - have the teens write letters to themselves now and then compare with letters they would write when older.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Cathe VINE VOICE on December 17, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As a high school librarian, I was excited to read Dear Teen Me so I could share it with my students, especially as many of my favorite authors were included in the collection. I found the book just so-so, however. I was hoping for more advice for teens but this seemed more authors just summarizing events in their lives, and many were like private messages understand only to the author. While many of the events were of interest to teens, the short treatment didn't allow the reader to be really pulled into their stories. A few letters with universal messages stood out to me, such as Riley Carney's letter to stick out high school and not give up her dream of writing; and Charles Benoit's eventual success at remaking himself. The Q and A sections were enjoyable as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Esther Schindler TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 4, 2013
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I sometimes wish that I could whisper to myself through time. I wish I could send myself-at-16 a hug, and say, "It will be okay," or maybe "Honestly, you might be in love with him, but it never WILL work out, for reasons that won't make sense for another 10 years" or "In 30 years when you discover this thing called Facebook you will discover you had more actual friends than you think you do, some of whom you are barely noticing in school." I expect most adults feel the same way, no matter what their childhood or teenage years were like.

That's the inspiration behind this sometimes uncomfortable, sometimes wonderful, sometimes just-okay book. It's a collection of letters that 70 Young Adult authors (mostly novelists but a few other creators such as a cartoonist and poet) wrote to their teenage selves. While the letters-to-me are obviously personal, they are also vignettes into the lives of teenagers EVERYwhere, most of whom feel they have an awful challenge to overcome or feel like an absolute dork. (Or maybe that's just those of us who became writers.)

I admit that I'm only halfway through reading this book, but I don't want to rush myself, and I can already tell you how cool it is.

The letters usually two or three pages long, so -- like a collection of short stories -- one might be inspiring to read, and the next one merely good. Because the authors are, well, AUTHORS, most of the letters are articulate and well written, sharing enough back-story so that you and I can understand what the author is talking about. It might be an author telling his teen self that it'd be a good idea to admit to himself that he's gay, or another author explaining that her self-image isn't what the other kids actually think of her. Or...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?