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  • Death Bed: The Bed That Eats [Blu-ray]
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Death Bed: The Bed That Eats [Blu-ray]


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Death Bed: The Bed That Eats [Blu-ray] + Death Spa [Blu-ray/DVD Combo] + Curtains (Blu-ray)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Demene Hall
  • Directors: George Barry
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Dolby, Full Screen, NTSC, Surround Sound
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Cult Epics
  • DVD Release Date: June 3, 2014
  • Run Time: 80 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00JXZ90EA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #111,058 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Prepare yourselves... The strangest bedtime story ever told! Cult Epics brings you Death Bed, George Barry's uniquely weird journey through a world of wind demons, carnivorous furnishings and the spirit of Aubrey Beardsley!
At the edge of a grand estate, near a crumbling old mansion lies a strange stone building with just a single room. In the room there lies a bed. Born of demonic power, the bed seeks the flesh, blood and life essence of unwary travelers... Three pretty girls on vacation, searching for a place to spend the night. Instead, they tumble into nightmares and the cruel insatiable hunger of the Bed! Death Bed is one-of-a kind experience: comic, horrific and dreamlike, that truly has to be seen to be believed. Discover this neglected marvel of American horror for yourself!

Special Features:

  • New HD Transfer
  • Introduction By Stephen Thrower, Author Of Nightmare USA (2013)
  • Introduction By George Barry (2003)
  • Audio Commentary By George Barry And Stephen Thrower
  • Nightmare USA - A Conversation Between Stephen Thrower And George Barry On Horror Films Of The 1970 s And 1980 s
  • Behind-The-Scenes Of Death Bed In Detroit (2013)
  • Original Death Bed Credit Music Track (1977)

Customer Reviews

Oh... My... Gosh... this is one of the worst movies I have ever seen, and I love it!
E. Temple
It is strange and even sometimes seems possibly silly, but there is just something about how seriously the movie was handled that makes it a fun watch.
M. Bartel
There is a guy hiding inside the walls and a bed that eats food, flowers, people and other things..
Amy Lynn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

81 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Thrower on September 23, 2003
Format: DVD
I first saw Death Bed: The Bed That Eats in 1988: a friend had discovered it whilst browsing at a cheap video sale and decided to spring the film on me. I was smitten by its weird aura right there and then, and mystified too. Who on Earth made it? What was the director playing at? How did such a movie get made? Death Bed, with its cheesy cover and `you're kidding me' title, was devoid of any credits, save for the words "(c) George Barry 1977." The mystery of Death Bed's origins was intensified as the film gathered momentum, from creepy comedy to poetic folk-tale to surreal horror: its mood ricocheted between registers in a way that defied categorisation, either as mind-warped outsider art, insane student project, or exploitation film gone awry. There was a streak of comedy, but the film wasn't just a cheap laugh: instead there was a loose, wayward dreaminess which gave Death Bed an impact all its own. I remember thinking `I must find out who made this!'. But no-one knew anything about Death Bed: the video label had disappeared, the name `George Barry' was anonymous enough to belong to a hundred thousand Americans. And so the trail went cold...
In 2002 I began work on a book about maverick American directors and my desire to find out more about Death Bed was re-ignited. Through the auspices of film researcher Marc Morris and a British web-site, Lightsfade, I finally had the chance to talk to George Barry and hear the full Death Bed story...
George Barry was born in 1949 and raised in Royal Oak, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit where he still lives today. He began making films whilst studying at University, and in 1972 - after working on a few b/w 16mm shorts - he decided to go for broke with a colour 16mm feature film to be blown up for theatrical release.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mike Liddell on April 17, 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A low eerie yet motherly voice tells Sharon to eat all of her food. On Sharon's plate there are larva, caterpillars, and a large cockroach. She is having a nightmare in the ominous bed born from a demons blood. As she sleeps her cross necklace slowly and patiently begins to saw away at her throat before the bed will devour her body and plant roses in her skull for her unknowing friends to pick. In the chamber a victim's ghost from this evil narrates this twisted macabre story while trapped behind his own painting.

That is just one of many such sequences in writer, producer, director George Barry's twisted, weird, and extremely creative only film. Death bed plays like an evil and Gothic fairytale, filled with dreamlike images and eerie effective sets.

I would imagine Wes Craven's classic A Nightmare on Elm Street (Infinifilm Edition) was greatly influenced by the film, from a bed getting into your dreams that wants nothing but to kill you. The bed is also a sadist as the tortured spirit of our narrator points out, taking pleasure in tormenting It's victims before finally devouring them.

The acting is pretty bad but that adds to the moments of dark comedy such as the bed drinking pepto bismal after eating a young girl.

The scenes of a black screen with the titles Breakfast or Dinner in white letters across the screen reminded me of the seasons spelled on screen during The Shining [Blu-ray] minus the eerie music.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 23, 2004
Format: DVD
I first saw Death Bed: The Bed That Eats in 1988: a friend discovered it whilst browsing at a cheap video sale and decided to spring the film on me. I was straight away smitten by its weird aura, and mystified too. Who on Earth made it? What was the director playing at? How did such a movie get made? Death Bed, with its cheesy cover and 'you're kidding me' title, was devoid of any credits, save for the words "(c) George Barry 1977." The mystery of Death Bed's origins was intensified as the film gathered momentum, from creepy comedy to poetic folk-tale to surreal horror: its mood ricocheted between registers in a way that defied categorisation, either as mind-warped outsider art, insane student project, or exploitation film gone berserk. There was a streak of comedy, but the film wasn't just a cheap laugh: instead there was a loose, wayward dreaminess which gave Death Bed an impact all its own. I remember thinking 'I must find out who made this!'. But no-one knew anything about Death Bed: the video label had disappeared, the name 'George Barry' was anonymous enough to belong to a hundred thousand Americans. And so the trail went cold...
In 2002 I began work on a book about maverick American directors and my desire to find out more about Death Bed was re-ignited. Through the auspices of film researcher Marc Morris and a British web-site, Lightsfade, I finally had the chance to talk to George Barry and hear the full Death Bed story...
George Barry was born in 1949 and raised in Royal Oak, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit where he still lives today. He began making films whilst studying at University, and in 1972 - after working on a few b/w 16mm shorts - he decided to go for broke with a colour 16mm feature film to be blown up for theatrical release.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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