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Death Has Come Up into Our Windows (The Zombie Bible) Paperback – August 14, 2012


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Product Details

  • Series: The Zombie Bible
  • Paperback: 110 pages
  • Publisher: 47North (August 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1612185827
  • ISBN-13: 978-1612185828
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 5.3 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,488,437 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Zombies are a powerfully resilient metaphor, able to absorb both horrifying bodily damage and whatever widespread cultural fears abide in the times of their creator or their setting, especially with regard to their origin stories. George Romero's "Living Dead" arose at the peak of the Cold War, animated by the same rampant radioactivity that struck deep fears in the American collective consciousness. In the film adaptation of I Am Legend (2007), "the infected" suffered a would-be cancer cure gone awfully awry. The list goes on and on. In Stant Litore's novella, the biblical prophet Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) warns the people of Jerusalem of the dangers of worshiping false gods while the city suffers the twin trials of zombie infestation from within and Babylonian siege from without. It's a wildly original tale: beautiful, terrifying, and deeply reverent. Racked by his divine calling, Litore's Jeremiah embodies the ambivalent prophet's existential anguish with memorable resonance. As such, Death Has Come Up into Our Windows is not only a great zombie yarn, it's also the most imaginative take on Jeremiah's story since Edward Snow's 1987 translation of the Rainer Maria Rilke poem that bears the prophet's name. Highly recommended. —Jason Kirk

Review

"What Litore has done shows the path of where some of us creators are going; I call it the de-sanitisation of the gospel: a visceral, messy, human take on a message of a visceral and tangible hope." —Siku, author of The Manga Bible

"Litore took aim at telling this sub-genre in a way that no one was doing and he absolutely nailed it. I’m seriously blown away by everything Litore has done here, and you will be, too. Death Has Come Up Into Our Windows, my friends." —James Garcia

“[Death Has Come Up Into Our Windows] is the first in what is currently a trilogy of historical zombie-fiction novels …retells the story of the Old Testament prophet Jeremiah, but replaces the leprosy victims and some of the heathen armies with the walking dead. The result is something heartbreaking and wonderful.” —Conflictium.com


More About the Author

Stant Litore is the author of The Zombie Bible series, Dante's Heart, the Ansible Stories, and the novella The Dark Need (part of the Dead Man series). He has an intense love of ancient languages, a fierce admiration for his ancestors, and a fascination with religion and history. He doesn't consider his writing a vocation; he considers it an act of survival. Litore lives in Colorado with his wife and two daughters and is at work on his next book.

www.stantlitore.com

http://www.facebook.com/stant.litore
@thezombiebible
zombiebible@gmail.com

Customer Reviews

It could have been 50% shorter, however.
Josh A Lowmaster
That said, the historical setting and unique perspective of the story is fascinating.
kmf2h
Definitely recommended to all zombie fans.
jdebarojr

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Hallam on October 12, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The Zombie Bible's first installment "Death has Up into Our Windows" is an extraordinary new addition to the zombie horror genre. What makes it extraordinary is not the vividly gory scenes of the dead eating the living (though there is plenty of it, if that's why you like zombie stories). Nor is it the horrible sound of a corpse drag-thumping its way in the dark, moaning its bottomless hunger to the world (though there is also plenty of that kind of thing, too, and very well done it is!). Nor is it the scenes of horror where the hero fights with zombies in mud at the bottom of a dry well, surviving only because he bashes the dead thing's head against a wall or shoves something sharp into its brainpan (and if you like that kind of grizzly thing, you'll like this). Rather, what makes it stand out is the way the author places zombies against the cultural backdrop of ancient Hebrew culture to ask the questions, "How would such a culture deal with a zombie plague and a potential zombie apocalypse? How would the ancient Hebrew culture's view of the dead as 'unclean' influence its ability to cope? How would such a culture respond to a man named Jeremiah who says he's God's own prophet come to warn against the impending zombie plague? Are zombies a sign of humankind's sins, or something else entirely?"

The Zombie Bible asks all these questions and more. It even has a sex scene (beautifully and poignantly written, to be sure), if you need a little sex mixed in with death and destruction (hey, who doesn't? we all need something to hold up against the darkness, right?). The Zombie Bible isn't just another zombie-story knockoff intended to make sure we turn on all our lights at 2am and keep an axe handy just in case one of the dead happens to break through our deadbolt.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By M Russ on January 1, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am an Episcopal Priest, which is only relevant in reporting that this book offers an exceptional look into a Prophet's head/experience as understood by those who wrote the texts. The compelling power of the Word of God that drives Jeremiah is well captured. Not yet finished reading it, but had to recommend it. Even for people who might not "get" the Zombie genre this might prove a fascinating read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By ARM on February 21, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was lured into reading Zombie Bible: Death Has Come Up Into Our Windows with the tease of Old Testament prophets cage fighting zombies. In reading, I expected a wry, amusing mashup between the Bible and zombies only to find out that I had been pleasantly mislead. This book is as deep as the well the prophet Yirmiyahu (Jeremiah) is tossed into where his captors drop the undead on him in cruel amusement.

Really, this book isn't a book about zombies (as some critics will point out), but rather it is a book about love. In between the sparse, yet exciting, zombie slayings, there is a rich, captivating romance. It concerns the love that the prophet has for his wife, his city Jerusalem, and for God. It seems strange to describe a book about zombies as being realistic, but the author gets deep inside the head of the prophet to learn what really fired him up and caused him to risk his life to bring an unpleasant message to a people that did not want to hear it. Yirmiyahu is a one-man Occupy the Temple movement, railing against the ruling and clergy class that had turned its back on the land's poor and mistreated -- and as a result God. In doing so Stant saves the reader from the popular false impression that Biblical prophets were simply predictors of the future, but rather rightly depicts them as the people's conscience crying out against social injustice and warning what the results would be for ungodly behavior.

One of many things that impressed me was Stant's command of the Biblical narrative backdrop. He simply didn't drop some zombies into a Biblical setting, sprinkling in some Hebrew words and locations for flavor. Rather he has a rich understanding, not just of the details of the source material, but of the underlying message of love.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Thea Gregory on December 2, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Length: 5:34 Mins
This book was an incredible experience, both in its masterful use of language, but in its equally compelling imagery. I outline my favorite points about The Zombie Bible in this video, and discuss my thoughts on the characters, setting and how accessible it is to all readers.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Chandler H. Cobb on December 29, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Zombies in the Old Testament Bible? This is the premise of this book focusing on the prophet Jeremiah. The king has thrown Jeremiah into the bottom of a well. Through flashbacks it is wonderful to glean how Jeremiah a simple Levite priest travels from his home town to Jerusalem where God begins to speak to him. Jeremiah's mission to bring the Israelites back into their covenant with God, which they have broken through vile acts.

Please note that this book is a delicious stretch of imagination taking a known prophet and creating an apocalyptical event of Biblical proportions and might offend those who believe in the literal translation of the Bible.

Personally, I found this book to be entertaining, scary and gross in a good way. The author's biography of himself had me laughing out loud and if you read this book, please do not miss it!!
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