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Death Is Not Always the Winner Paperback – October, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Pureplaypress.Com; 1 edition (October 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0971436606
  • ISBN-13: 978-0971436602
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,867,247 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

" ... an indispensable source for understanding the political developments on the island … highly recommended for bookstores and ... libraries." -- Dolores Koch, Criticas magazine, Jan./Feb. 2003

"A vivid portrait of the complex political struggles that allowed Castro to become the long-lasting despot in Latin America." -- Benigno Dou, Assistant Managing Editor, El Nuevo Herald (Miami)

"A work of undoubted historic value.... Landau has pulled off a genuine tour de force ... " -- El Nuevo Herald (Miami), May 25, 2003

"I think this book could have, for years, a resonance like that of Arthur Koestler’s 'Darkness at Noon'." -- Ricardo Bofill, founder, Cuban Committee for Human Rights

"Landau's way of describing the unpleasant parts of human nature is full of understanding, and therefore of hope." -- Carmen Alfonso, wife of a former Cuban mayor

"No writer has achieved a more vivid portrait of how Fidel Castro became the most powerful despot in Latin America." -- Benigno Dou, Latin American newspaper editor and novelist

"This novel is written by someone who is able to treat very anguishing human situations with delicacy and respect." -- Carmen Alfonso, Wife of a Former Cuban Mayor

From the Publisher

This novel embodies a notable venture in which the work is appearing simultaneously in English and Spanish. The translator who re-created the English original in Spanish is himself a prize-winning novelist. For any publisher to issue a work in two languages at the same time is extremely rare; for an independent publisher, it may be unprecedented. With respect to Cubans and Americans, the goal of our present publication and of others to follow is to bridge a conspicuous and lamentable cultural gap.

Many readers find this historical novel full of relevance in looking at present-day Cuba. When the Elian Gonzalez affair came along, an American woman who had earlier seen the book in manuscript commented that the novel gave her a special window on what was happening. A Mexican businessman and diplomat told the author: "Thousands of people are going to be thankful to you for explaining the Cuban political situation as you have done."

Many people around the world already have a keen interest in the Castro-Cuba story. In coming years, as Cuba unravels from the difficulties of the Castro years, the novel's subject will only gain in interest. In each of its languages, this book will have a shelf-life -- and its publisher's support -- for many years to come.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on June 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
Death Is Not Always The Winner by publisher, radio broadcaster, and foreign policy expert David Landau is an original novel about Cuba and the United States during the implacable reign of Fidel Castro's. Based on true historical events, and deftly written with a keen eye toward Cuban hearts and minds, Death Is Not Always The Winner accurately and engagingly portrays complex political machinations and the individual lives that are all too often destroyed in the eternal struggle for power and influence. Highly recommended reading!
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Format: Paperback
Death Is Not Always the Winner by David Landau

David gave me two books a sunny day in North Beach; in his off handed, jovial fashion he said, “Don’t hurry to read them.” Then he laughed. I was definitely going to read them, if not immediately, as fast as I could work through my cue. He filled the balance of our lunch time with stories of “mischief” he was stirring in Guatemala, confounding a corrupt far-left and an empowered far-right. Until I read Death Is Not Always the Winner, something he’d penned a few years ago, I had little idea just how “mischief” informed who David Landau is.

The current resurgence of interplay between the civilian US population and Cuba and the immanent un-cooling (does one dare say warming?) of relations and hope for social commerce, this book is one we must read. We must read it lest we be ignorant of subterfuge on both sides, lest we forget the lessons our government (and Cuba’s) should have—but did not—learn in the last half century, or lest we miss the sense of who Cuban truly are and who they have been. Perhaps we may also learn why.

In 9th grade social studies I asked Mr. Trochel, “Is there going to be war?” Krushchev and Kennedy were at loggerheads over missiles in Cuba. That is as much as I ever knew about Cuban relations. Now, I feel better informed, wiser, attentive.
Landau’s hero, Rodrigo, a nom de guerre, proves his dedication to revolution and his mettle as both a man and a counterrevolutionary. His fortunes and misfortunes are concerning, but both he sets below his work: “It was a beautiful play [on the part of the CIA], and it should have worked with any man – but Rodrigo was not any man.
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