Buy New
$7.20
Qty:1
  • List Price: $8.00
  • Save: $0.80 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Vintage Classics) Paperback – October 2, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0307951335 ISBN-10: 0307951332 Edition: Reprint

Buy New
Price: $7.20
52 New from $3.55 24 Used from $4.10
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$7.20
$3.55 $4.10
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Death of Ivan Ilyich (Vintage Classics) + Heart of Darkness (Dover Thrift Editions)
Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Series: Vintage Classics
  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (October 2, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307951332
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307951335
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #243,933 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

 “The English-speaking world is indebted to these two translators.” —Orlando Figes, The New York Review of Books
 
“Excellent. . . . The duo has managed to convey the rather simple elegance of Tolstoy’s prose.” —The New Criterion
 
“Pevear and Volokhonsky’s new version is . . .  flexible individuated, immediate.” —The Nation

“Well translated. As a lover of Tolstoy’s work, one couldn’t ask for more, and I can’t recommend it highly enough.” —André Alexis, The Globe and Mail (Toronto)

About the Author

Count Leo Tolstoy (1828–1910) was born in central Russia. After serving in the Crimean War, he retired to his estate and devoted himself to writing, farming, and raising his large family. His novels and outspoken social polemics brought him world fame.
 
Richard Pevear has published translations of Alain, Yves Bonnefoy, Alberto Savinio, Pavel Florensky, and Henri Volohonsky, as well as two books of poetry. He has received fellowships or grants for translation from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the French Ministry of Culture. Larissa Volokhonsky was born in Leningrad. She has translated works by the prominent Orthodox theologians Alexander Schmemann and John Meyendorff into Russian.

Together, Pevear and Volokhonsky have translated Dead Souls and The Collected Tales by Nikolai Gogol, The Complete Short Novels of Chekhov, and The Brothers Karamazov, Crime and Punishment, Notes from Underground, Demons, The Idiot, and The Adolescent by Fyodor Dostoevsky. They were twice awarded the PEN Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize (for their version of Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and for Tolstoy's Anna Karenina), and their translation of Dostoevsky's Demons was one of three nominees for the same prize. They are married and live in France.


More About the Author

Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) wrote two of the great novels of the nineteenth century, War and Peace and Anna Karenina.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LB Song on April 11, 2014
Format: Paperback
The marvel of Tolstoy is his instinctive grasp of the desperate choices humans face in life.

He has an uncanny skill in both portraying our ability to love and hate, as well as our motivations and fears. When reading his stories, I often feel myself completely succumbing to his world, as if I’ve known the characters my whole life. The deep emotional and intellectual resonance of his works stay with me long after I close the pages.

Such a work is The Death of Ivan Ilych, a short story published in 1886.

In it, the reader can see the roots of the moral questions that Tolstoy himself will wrestle with his whole life. The primary question being: what is a good life?

For Ivan Ilych, he had answered this question by leading a life that was, “the most simple and most ordinary and therefore most terrible”. A dutiful Russian bureaucrat, his navigated life by relying on the good sense of society to decide what was proper. His chief pleasure came from a sense of his own power over inferiors, and secondary pleasures from playing bridge and indulging in bourgeoisie tastes at home.

Yet throughout this innocent ascendance in social position, there were cracks that betrayed a denial of the truth underneath the life of “legality, correctitude, and propriety”. The truth at last manifested itself in the form of physical and psychological pain, plaguing him endlessly and making life more miserable than death. Faced with this curse and sensing death’s close presence, Ivan Ilych began to wonder, “What if my whole life had been wrong?”.

Ilych looked backed at his life, and realized suddenly, “all that for which he had lived- and saw clearly that it was not real at all, but a terrible and huge deception which had hidden both life and death.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
In "The Death of Ivan Ilyich", Tolstoy explores "death" through the feeling and thoughts of a man who is, slowly but surely, descending towards his end. This short novella can be interpreted in many ways, and I assume none of them would be off the mark. For me, it was a story about a man who realized that he never truly lived, but rather only drifted through life. It is also an interesting exposé of how a family copes, or in this case fails to cope, with the death of their loved ones. Somewhat like Dickens, Tolstoy provided great insight into the human condition. "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" is a great place to start with Tolstoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Janda on June 12, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Poor Ivan Ilyich - he lived a mistaken life and died young and uncomfortably in consequence. If readers do learn from Ivan's mistakes they'll do better in their lives.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By ffancy on March 31, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wow! What an amazing story! I've never read anything quite like this! It sure was a good book. I definitely enjoyed the crap out of it. Okay, I didn't actually read this yet, it was bought for my husband for school. I will read it once I get through all of my other books...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joseph P. Tevington on July 31, 2013
Format: Paperback
Read no further, if you are concerned about "spoilers"....

A comparison between Ivan Ilyich and Sir Thomas More seems inevitable - two government lawyers facing their own deaths. More certainly came across as the man of stronger character. Had he compromised his character, More could have avoided his physical death (albeit only temporarily). Ilyich comes across as a man who has lived in search of status, rather than character. His encounters with a caring, "Good Samaritan" seem to have led him back to the Divine and to an ultimate acceptance of his fate.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?