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Showing 1-10 of 13 reviews(1 star). Show all reviews
on March 5, 2014
I chose this rating because:

- this is not generally worth one's time, given the fact that its essence (just like all of Lencioni's books) can be boiled down to a 1-2 page exec summary. It warrants a brief (and free) article on a biz blog. The exec summary gets padded into a largely unrealistic, fable-based, zinger-titled book. Meetings aren't rocket science people: have a clear agenda and set of goals, make a tough call about involving the right people, ensure you know the RACI structure (or whatever you use) in any decision making, make sure to all be polite, professional, listen, etc... It's not that hard. If you need guidelines to help tweak or validate what you're doing, find a free article somewhere that is actually tested (unlike these bogus fables)

- this is yet another play into what I think of as the business-book-cult. It's like a pyramid scheme but much more powerful, in that these zinger biz books exploit those who are in exec power, where they will *require* their subordinates to buy their books, and usually on the company dime (hey, you don't have to pay for it! Though you typically have to use your own personal time to read it; time you'll never get back.) It's a brilliant book-selling business model, when you think about it.

BTW, many of the 5 star reviews appear to be planted. They are too perfect, too tight, too brief.
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on March 26, 2014
except that going to meetings are important - that is all you get out of the entire book - the first half of which is (yawn) totally vapid.
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on December 23, 2013
required reading by our CEO. takes 200 pages to make a few basic points. kept waiting for something redeeming... nada.
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on August 12, 2013
I recently bought a couple of books on the topic of meetings as part of a research project. This one was by far the weakest of the lot. 95% is a long-winded fictional narrative about a poorly led games company. Meetings are part of the narrative, but there is little to no actionable insight gained from the narrative. The book has 254 pages. The actual advice starts on page 221. Go figure. Even the advice given is so generic as to be almost entirely useless.
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on March 25, 2004
A group of opinionated, strong-willed executives talking rationally about topics that are going to decide the fate of their professional lives for the next six months? No wonder the author presents this as a fable! Let's face it, one of the things that makes people successful professionally is their confidence in their own ideas and their drive to see them implemented, which is precisely what makes it hard to get a group of such people to defer to one another and agree to someone else's idea. This book completely ignores this fact, and paints a very unrealistic picture of happy, cooperative coworkers all explaining their views in a professional, respectful manner. What about the personality traits that invariably serve to undermine even the most carefully planned or strictly controlled meeting? Arrogance, stubborness, and pride are the chief problem with meetings, in my experience, but this book teaches that boredom is the major problem and suggests the solution is creating conflict in meetings, even "mining" for it. Sure, that will eliminate boredom, but lead to all sorts of other problems like personal attacks and bitter fractionalization, which are even worse. This book's simplistic, idealist suggestions will only work in fairy tales, not in the real business world.
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on July 3, 2015
Just silly. I should,have stopped with who took my cheese.
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on September 22, 2004
The premise of the meeting structure that the author proposes could be summed up in one page. Instead, the "fable" continues for over 200 pages. The meeting structure is interesting, though not a new idea at all. Read the executive summary and skip the rest.
22 comments| 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on December 15, 2004
I have read all of Lencionni's other books and this one is a real disappointment. I didn't believe a single second of it. Please have the major character come to our company; he would be lynched in a minute.
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on September 22, 2004
The story lacks life and is poorly written. What could have been an engaging 20-page short story ended up as dozens of 3-5 page chapters in large type with wide margins. You'll find yourself skimming for substance which you won't find until at least half-way through. Read the executive summary, don't waste your time on the rest.
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on December 23, 2012
I read the book hoping I would get something from it like "Who Moved My Cheese". I got nothing from this book.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse