Death of a Naturalist: Poems and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.76
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Death of a Naturalist (Faber Pocket Poetry) Paperback – January 1, 1991


See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Import
"Please retry"
$145.95
Paperback, January 1, 1991
$14.95 $0.77
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$15.00
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: FABER (1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571202403
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571202409
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 4.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,611,628 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Seamus Heaney was born in 1939 in County Derry in Northern Ireland. Death of a Naturalist, his first book, appeared in 1966. Since then he has published poetry, criticism and translations for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995. He received the Whitbread Book of the Year for The Spirit Level (1996) and Beowulf (1999). His twelfth and most recent collection, District and Circle, was published in April 2006. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jason P Ruel on May 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
Skeptical at first, it was required reading [in university] that turned out to be welcome reading. Not only are the poems very well written [as would be expected from a winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature] but the way they are presented makes them all the more interesting. He approaches his own life, looking at his transition from childhood to adulthood and his decision of poetry over the rural life of his family.
Noteable poems in this volume include: Digging, Death of a Naturalist, The Early Surges, Lovers on Aran, Poem, and Synge on Aran. 34 poems in total.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Tom Adair on September 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
Seamus Heaney's first collection of poems is an accessible and understated experiment in lyrical description. It was written in 1966 and what first strikes the contemporary is an adherence to metrical and rhyming (usually off-rhyming) patterns now considered undesirably strict. Much of the time Heaney smacks of Larkin - without (for this reader) the touch of Larkin's charismatic individuality. But one quickly appreciates the earnest craftsmanship of these poems. Indeed Heaney's characteristic equation of poetry with 'working', 'labouring', etc. is evident throughout these early pieces. 'Between my finger and my thumb / The squat pen rests. / I'll dig with it.': there are many instances here of words being forged or moulded or indeed excavated to create a construct of sincere meaning. This is what poetry is all about. Heaney has a strong, unambiguously masculine voice that can, at times, sound like sixteenth-century verse ('Scaffolding' reads like a latterday metaphysical poem). Elsewhere - despite a perhaps enervating lack of humour and whimsicality (although, on consideration, it is by no means a total lack) - these poems sound confident, clear-sighted and sensitive in the way that farmers are (gruffly) sensitive.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Wordsworth on August 31, 2013
Format: Paperback
I began reading this first book of poetry by the Nobel Laureate from Ireland a few weeks ago. My wife and daughter were traveling on the Dingle Peninsula and stayed a few nights visiting Trinity College and drank pints of Guinness and Bushmills at the Temple Bar and witnessed the statues of James Joyce and Oscar Wilde in the greens of the great Gaelic capital. Ireland is an island which adores its poets, literary novelists and playwrights with a national ardor that I devoutly wish for my own country so immersed in commercial fare and cultural pap. Have you ever seen photos of the Library at Trinity College Dublin? It's where God goes to read on Sunday. I stayed at home to work and as the iPhone photos came in from Dublin, Galway, Coole, Adare and Dingle, I connected with my beloved family by reading the great Irish naturalist, Seamus Heaney. I finished this book without knowing that he had been so ill and he died the very next day. The timing of the death of this Nobel naturalist and my reading of him struck me as providentially uncanny. But what a magnificent literary legacy he leaves behind and one could see his prolific poetic gifts in this work, his first published collection which paints such a humble and humbling portrait of life among the farms and villages of rural Ireland. This is a hard life with grim realities. It's a life of tilling the boulder laden sod behind horses pulling a plough. Heaney writes about digging potatoes flashing white in soil from the spade and how blackberries ferment and turn green so soon after the picking. He writes about the ability of the Irish to endure great tempests blasting off the ocean. And about the grim business of shooting snipe at dawn.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Renee S. on December 14, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
ive read studied and taught poetry for years and along with opened ground this is the volume i keep coming back to. themes imagery and emotions that curve with time never to be lost. essential.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Loraine M. Devany on February 14, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Seamus Heaney is a good writer. His book has many short poems in it that are somewhat funny. I recommend this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?