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Death: The Time of Your Life Paperback – December 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Series: Death
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; Cmc edition (December 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563893339
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563893339
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.2 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #799,860 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Good story with great artwork!
Lee
The characters also seemed a bit out of place and there was a few random scenes that I couldn't quite wrap my head around.
FicktionPhotography
Basically, if you're familiar with Gaiman's comic book work, you'll enjoy this read.
Blake A. Campbell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By RKB on April 8, 1999
Format: Paperback
Neil Gaiman continues to impress with his sharp attention to creating a wholly developed world of characters. _Death: The Time of Your Life_ is a welcome spotlight on two characters that have traveled through several "Sandman" novels, as well as Death's previous novel, _The High Cost of Living._ While their appearance was brief in _The High Cost of Living_ (Foxglove taking center stage for one song, then fading into the background with a second) both the songs and the characters have a far deeper lineage within the Sandman series. Indeed, if you begin to trace the origins of Foxglove and Hazel, you will be treated to one of the richest, most complex story lines in the Sandman universe.
Begin with _A Game of You,_ and you will learn what Foxglove meant when she said, near the end of _The Time of Your Life,_ "We'd had a bad night once, in Manhattan, years ago. Bad dreams, people died." You will also discover the origin of the song "George's tongue." You will meet the friend, Wanda, to whom Foxglove refers when introducing her second song, back in _The High Cost of Living._ So many details. Keep looking and you will find more.
Follow the story arc backwards to _The Doll's House,_ where Foxglove's "small world" is perhaps at its tightest. You will meet someone who knows Donna Cavanaugh, before she turns into Foxglove. You will meet someone who will later share an apartment building with Foxglove and Hazel. You will find several allusions to, and a newspaper clipping of, a defining moment in Foxglove's life.
"24 Hours," perhaps the single most riveting story in the Sandman series, can be found in _Preludes and Nocturnes.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
In the hands of most ordinary writers, this book would be a disaster. It juggles a myriad of complex issues, such as sexuality, the fleeting nature of fame, the multiple meanings of love, desire, and committment, and the value of friendship and life. Each of these concepts would be enough for a book on its own...
Aren't we lucky that Neil Gaiman is definitely no ordinary writer? And his character of Death is extraordinary too; she cares.
Foxglove is struggling personally even as her fame shoots through the roof - she wonders whether she should stay in the closet, and whether she should stay with Hazel and their son Alvie or go it alone. Hazel is struggling too; she wants to know the value of her relationship, and to save her son's life, most of all. Death listens. Understandingly. Patiently. And because of her, Hazel and Foxglove realize what matters most to them.
Though it lacks the immediacy and emotional power of Death: The High Cost Of Living, this is still a captivating companion piece. It carries through the same message as D:THCOL - the most important thing in life is to remember to live.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Thessaly on March 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
Despite the title, Death isn't the central character in this graphic novel; but that's fine with me, as I find Hazel and Foxglove equally interesting. I don't know what people are talking about--I *like* the art. It's not like Sandman art, it's very slick and airbrushed-looking. But still cool, especially the scenes with the neat checkered borders. You should probably know that you're unlikely to get the version you can see a photo of on this website--the black-and-white cover with Death drinking coffee. My version has quite a different cover--some person who doesn't look like Death. Still, it should be the same story.

I liked this just as much as The High Cost of Living, maybe more. Death is less bubbly, more subdued...still not as cool she is in _Sandman_, but fine. This is more human and moving, I think, than THCOL. I love Death's "Nobody's creepy from the inside..." speech. I think the reason she's so melancholy in this book is because...well, this is just after The Kindly Ones and The Wake, right? You know what I'm talking about, if you've read them.

Like High Cost of Living, this isn't quite up to the standards of Sandman, but quite worthwhile. If you want my opinion, it's best to read both _Death_ series one after the other, between A Game of You and Fables and Reflections. Earlier, you wouldn't recognize certain of the characters; later, you won't appreciate the _Death_ books so much because they can't come close to the beauty of the later issues of Sandman.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Geoffrey Brent on October 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
(Warning: contains major plot spoilers)
I have to admit, this story disappointed me. It's OK, but just not as good as I've come to expect from Neil Gaiman. In 'Sandman' and 'Death: The High Cost Of Living' he managed to create a character who was at once very likeable and yet utterly convincing. She loves _everybody_, no matter who they are, and when their time is up she comes for them - that's who and what she is. The Endless may look and even act human now and then, but they're not. She's not 'Death Girl'; she _is_ death.
But in 'The Time Of Your Life', Gaiman tries to make her more human. When Alvin dies, she takes pity on Hazel and gives him a few more months of life; later, she allows someone else to die in his place. This is not how death works in the real world, and up until now it's not how Death has worked in Gaiman's world either. It's not true to the character we know, and the change just isn't convincing. Gaiman has engineered a 'happy ending' of sorts, but the credibility of his character has suffered.
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