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December's Children


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Audio CD, August 30, 1988
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The Rolling Stones Charlie is my Darling - Ireland 1965 Super Deluxe Box Set Animation

Biography

A History in the Whirlwind: The Rolling Stones’ 50th Anniversary

By Anthony DeCurtis

When the nascent Rolling Stones began playing gigs around London in 1962, the notion that a rock & roll band would last five years, let alone fifty, was an absurdity. After all, what could possibly be more ephemeral than rock & roll, the latest teenage fad? Besides, other factors made ... Read more in Amazon's The Rolling Stones Store

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 30, 1988)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Abkco
  • ASIN: B000003BE7
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,968 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. She Said Yeah
2. Talkin' About You
3. You Better Move On
4. Look What You've Done
5. The Singer Not The Song
6. Route 66
7. Get Off Of My Cloud
8. I'm Free
9. As Tears Go By
10. Gotta Get Away
11. Blue Turns To Grey
12. I'm Moving On

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Dig how even a tossed-together cash-in by the Stones' U.S. label--the group's third American album of 1965--ends up smoking like all but their very best. They invent thrash with the opener, "She Said Yeah" (a Specialty Records obscurity penned, under a pseudonym, by Sonny Bono!) before laying down a leering "Talkin' 'Bout You," a frenetic "I'm Movin' On" and their most consistent, varied list of originals yet. Dig, too, how even "As Tears Go By" sounds like a sneer in the midst of "Get Off of My Cloud," "Gotta Get Away," "I'm Free" and the dourly off-key "Blue Turns to Grey." --Rickey Wright

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 1999
Format: Audio CD
"December's Children" is a record deserving closer attention from fans and critics alike. Superior efforts from each member of the band are highlighted in every song, from Charlie Watts' crashing beat in "Get Off My Cloud" to Jagger's persuading vocals for "The Singer not the Song." While the last 6 tracks probably attract the most mainstream attention, it is the beginning tracks that will keep the consummate Stones fans coming back for another listen. "December's Children" signifies the pinnacle of Keith Richards and Brian Jones' musical comradery and their talents as razor-edged and gritty performers have never been showcased better.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 29, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This album is often overlooked by fans of the early Stones, caught as it is between Out Of Our Heads (which contained "Satisfaction" and was their first hit LP in the U.S.) and Aftermath (which usually gets the lions' share of critical acclaim for Stones albums of this period). But I actually much prefer this to either of those albums; the songs, individually and as a whole, are stronger here and the band simply sounds more "together." Toss in a great cover photo and Andrew Loog Oldham's hilariously pretentious back-cover poetry and you've got a perfect time capsule of the band in its mid-60's breakout period.
As great as the music itself is, however, you can't avoid the fact that the current CD version, like all of the Stones' '60s catalog, just plain bites. Terrible sound quality (even allowing for the age of the recordings), bare-bones packaging...when is Abkco going to reissue these titles, with decent remastering, improved CD booklets, and bonus tracks? Oh well, at least the original albums are available on CD rather than just a couple of greatest-hits collections.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "lukakluc" on April 12, 2002
Format: Audio CD
A collection of everybody's B-sides and definitely one A-side at the times when A-side was the bright sunny good Dr Jekyll's side and B-side was somewhat shadowy nocturnal Mr Hyde's side. The shadowy nature of this ellpee is also conveyed by the choice of the photos and low-key liner notes by Andrew Loog Oldham (rhymed, to be sure). Tired and exhausted, uninspired and knocked off in what was left of a recording session, these efforts all borrow their light from a major star called "Get Off Of My Cloud", like cold planets circling round their white hot sun.
A quicksilver rendition of "She Said Yeah" opens this little solar system of songs, the version Sir Paul McCartney surely had in mind when he said "yeah" to the song some 34 years later ("Run Devil Run"). The Stones didn't play it, they attacked it, like they attacked earlier Lennon/McCartney's "I Wanna Be Your Man".
It takes as many as four songs to balance the breathtaking pace with which the record starts. If Chuck Berry really said the Stones' "Carol" ("Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out") is best-ever version of his song, then the same could be said 'bout this classic rocker of his (Funny how the opening note resembles the notorious feedback in the Fab Four A-side "I Feel Fine").
Alexander's "You Better Move On" is an exceptional track. There's nothing one can compare it to and this might be one of the reasons the song made it on the Big Hits Volume 2 "Through the Past, Darkly", UK version.
The haunting choruses of "You Better Move On" give way to all the more haunting harmonica hovering around "Look What You've Done". The subtlety and certain elegance of this blues gives one an eerie feeling of an echo of the song itself, like if recorded long after the band had left the premises.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AntiochAndy on May 8, 2001
Format: Audio CD
"DECEMBER'S CHILDREN is a good progress report, showing where the Stones came from and where they had arrived at, musically. It works well as a summation of their early work, but to refer to it as a "masterpiece" is a bit over the top. It isn't even a whole "piece". Instead, it is a collection of odds and ends recorded at various times and thrown together by the company to keep the momentum going in the marketplace while the band was busy with other matters. The difference in the quality of the sound from track to track is an illustration of their varied origins. Some are clearly a good bit older than others. Nor are Keith and Mick discovering their songwriting talents at this point. "Satisfaction", generally regarded as one of the best rock songs ever recorded, was written by Jagger and Richards and appeared on the band's previous album. Honing their skills? No doubt. Just discovering their talents? Hardly.
As with all of the Stones prior releases, this one includes a nice mix of Jagger/Richards compositions, covers, and the obligatory hit single ("Get Off My Cloud" in this case). AFTERMATH, their next release, changes that format, and the band relies almost exclusively on Jagger/Richards songs from then on. Here, the Stones show their mastery of their blues and R&B roots, as well as their growing ability to expand their horizons and develop their own unique sound. You won't hear anything like the marimbas and sitars that are soon to come, but songs like "As Tears Go By" and "Blue Turns To Grey" go beyond the basic style and arrangement heard on tunes like "Gotta Get Away" and "Look What You Done".
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