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314 of 356 people found the following review helpful
"Deception Point" opens in Washington, DC, during a tight Presidential campaign. The incumbent, a man of strong principles, is a major NASA supporter. His opponent, who is basing his campaign on turning NASA into a private, non-governmental agency, thus saving the US taxpayer billions of dollars annually, is way up in the polls. He is also accepting enormous illegal campaign contributions from private aerospace companies who have billions to gain from the privatization of NASA. After many failures & much spending, NASA is badly in need of a success.
Then a NASA satellite detects a large, high-density rock buried 200 feet below the Milne Ice Shelf on Ellesmere Island, high in the Arctic Circle. NASA scientists determine the rock to be a meteor containing fossils proving that life exists elsewhere in the universe.
To verify the authenticity of the find, the White House sends a team of independent experts to the NASA habisphere, built over the meteor in the Arctic Circle. One of these experts is the intelligence analyst Rachel Sexton, the daughter of Senator Sedgewick Sexton. Senator Sexton is the man running for election against the President of the United States. The plot thickens.
Rachel, while in the Arctic, uncovers what could be scientific trickery - an incredible deception that could cause political and scientific upheaval and cost the President his bid for re-election. When she & her colleagues attempt to investigate further, they are plunged into life threatening danger. To escape assassination they flee for their lives. Their only hope for survival is to discover who is behind this extraordinary plot and expose the truth.
Dan Brown has proven to be one of the top writers in the suspense-thriller genre. The originality of his plots, his amazingly accurate research, and his ability to catch the reader's interest from the get-go and hold it until the last word in the last sentence of the last page, make him an exceptional author. Plus, after completing each of Dan Brown's books, the reader usually comes away from the experience having learned much more than a storyline. I loved "Deception Point" - couldn't put it down. I also highly recommend "The Da Vinci Code" and "Angels and Demons."
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81 of 94 people found the following review helpful
After reading the INCREDIBLE 'Da Vinci Code' and the equally exciting 'Angels & Demons' I figured I couldn't go wrong with 'Deception Point' and I was 100% RIGHT. Dan Brown is fast becoming one of my all-time favorite authors.
After becoming familiar with Brown's religious thrillers, I was pleasantly surprised to find out that 'Deception Point' was entirely different--but JUST as much fun. If you enjoy stories about conspiracies that are as big as they come, this story is definitely for YOU.
Rachel Sexton works for the Intelligence Community compiling information for the President. The odd twist in this story is that we are coming up on election time and the man poised to snatch the White House from under the feet of current President Zach Herney is none other than Rachel's own estranged Father, Senator Sedgewick Sexton. It takes some time to figure out who is indeed the bad guys in this tale--and trust me, you will probably be wrong anyway--but finding out certainly IS a great deal of the fun here. Rachel is contacted by the President and asked to confirm for his current staff the existence of a Meteor found near the Top of the World. Not just ANY Meteor, either. At first Rachel is stunned that the President would be so forward and ask this of the daughter of his biggest rival. Senator Sexton has been THE single largest thorn in the side of NASA because of their chronic overspending and multi-billion dollar failures--screw-up's that have cost the American taxpayers dearly over the years. President Herney has been one of NASA's biggest supporters, much to his own detriment in the polls lately. Rachel actually HAS been chosen specifically because of her relationship to his rival to make this report. President Herney believes that this discovery will come with a great deal of skepticism, even from his own staff. So who better to make this announcement than the daughter of the man who wants to TAKE the White House from President Herney? Rachel agrees under a few stipulations and is off to an Ice Shelf at the North Pole. This sets the stage for the Mother of ALL Conspiracies, and when you find out the source of WHY it was all hatched, and WHO is behind it, the surprise ought to be rather big (at least it was for me).
Is the Meteorite in fact real, and if not, how could NASA have possibly tricked some of the most brilliant scientific minds of the country? Is the President IN on this possible scandal, or is he a pawn of someone infinitely more devious? And what about Senator Sexton? Is he who he says he is? Are his motives clean and pure, or is he just as bad as those attempting to fraud the world? There are some honest-to-goodness twists & turns you can expect in 'Deception Point' and a few genuine surprises along the way. Always fun and actually quite educational about the workings of NASA and it answers the question of why don't we see more privately funded companies winning contracts to launch into space? Get to know Dan Brown, do it today! You will NOT be disappointed. Highly Recommended.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon April 1, 2003
Dan Brown can keep you clutching your book, well into the night, despite your better intentions to put it down. If you have to move, you will take the book with you. To the bathroom, to the breakfast table, even to your important meeting the next day.
Quite possibly one of the best of his generation's storytellers, Dan Brown weaves a fascinating tale of betrayal, military force, and scientific intrigue. All of his books are extremely well researched, combining the facts most of us desire with the what-if that most of us fear. A compelling storyteller with his head in the clouds and his feet on the ground, he is one of his generation's best.
This book doesn't fail to produce. I won't spoil the book for you, but trust me when I tell you not to think that you know what is going on until the end and you have put the book down. It is awesome!
A great read, and highly recommended.
Harkius
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon May 20, 2006
Like many other people, I decided to read Deception Point after enjoying Angels and Demons and Da Vinci Code, but I was kind of disappointed.

The presentation of the Da Vinci code made the plot somewhat believable, even if it is inaccurate. Deception Point, on the other hand, has several, crazy action scenes that are comparable to the big finale in Angels and Demons. Several parts of the book are so crazy that you have to ask, "Why would that even happen in the first place?" or "How could anyone possibly do that?"

Despite the implausible action, it is a pretty exciting book. I read it over the course of a week (I read Da Vinci Code in two days), and found it to be pretty enjoyable. It's not as complicated as the Da Vinci Code, but it's still a page turner. Just don't expect another Da Vinci Code and you'll probably enjoy Deception Point.

This reprint is taller than the regular paperback books that I have, but about the same size in depth. It makes it feel kind of awkard to open at first, but it's not really a problem after you wear it in a bit. Just a warning if you're obsessive about having all of your books line up in the bookshelf.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on May 6, 2006
After reading The Da Vinci Code, I enjoyed so much Dan Brown's writing that I decided to give a try to another of his book. Deception Point looked interesting to me because of the NASA / politic conspiracy theme I had never seen before. The novel is quite different from the DVC and "Angels & Demons", two books featuring Robert Langdon as the main character and art, symbology and riddles as main topics.

After only 3 chapters, I had a hard time trying to put it down. The intrigue is fascinating and well-built, the characters are not numerous but complete and well developed as the story gets more complex. A few parts of the intrigue are predictable but the global development is great and full of surprises.

With this book, Brown proves he is an intelligent and dynamic author with a great sense of perfection (he did plenty of researches to expose the numerous technologies presented in his book). Great intrigue, great pace, a good novel for occasional and fanatic readers !
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31 of 38 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 13, 2003
This is one of those books that you just can't put down. I read this one in record time. It centers around the discovery of a meteorite at the North Pole that contains, what appears to be, exterrestial life. Just judging by the title of the book you can determine that there is a ruse going on. And those that stumble onto the deception must be eliminated.
The action is fact-paced and the characters are extremely intriguing! I especially liked the scientists when they are so into themselves as being right that they just discount anyone that questions their analyses. Additionally, like the title also implies, not all the characters are what you think they are!
I would have rated this higher except that some of the escapes/rescues got so unbelievable that they insulted the reader's intelligence.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 27, 2003
Dan Brown prefaces "Deception Point" with a seemingly innocuous announcement: "All technologies described in this novel exist." The novel proceeds with descriptions of a remarkable array of military technology, from airplanes that fly at three times the speed of sound to guns that manufacture their own ammunition from nearby supplies like snow or sand. If this matériel does exist, Brown has accomplished a remarkable feat of research in discovering it, and it's worth reading "Deception Point" just for the descriptions of it.
The novel's relentless pace and plot twists furnish another reason to recommend it. Other Amazon.com reviews have already touched on this point, so I will not explore it further in mine. In general, though, they make it possible to recommend "Deception Point" with enthusiasm.
"Deception Point" is not perfect. It's implausible in two respects that I want to mention here.
First, the characters perform feat after feat of extraordinary ingenuity, cheating death time and again. At points the novel becomes cartoon-like in this respect. But it's well-written and engaging enough that I think most readers will happily suspend disbelief, allowing themselves to be carried along as a vivid chain of events spools out.
Second, the plot of "Deception Point" relies on extensive American operations on, and removal of a priceless physical object from, Ellesmere Island in the high arctic. The novel treats Ellesmere Island as if it were U.S. territory, and as if U.S. government agencies could do what they want there unnoticed and without interference.
In reality, Ellesmere Island is part of Canada; it lies in the territory of Nunavut (itself formerly part of the Northwest Territories). The northernmost island in the high Canadian arctic, it has a Canadian military station (the outpost of Alert) and a tiny civilian community (Grise Fiord or Aujuittuq). (Ellesmere Island lies only about 14 miles (26 kilometers) from Greenland; thus, a little-known geographical fact is that Canada is about as close to Denmark as is New York City to suburban Connecticut!) So, contrary to the plot of "Deception Point," it's unlikely that exploration of Ellesmere Island could proceed undetected and a priceless physical object removed from it without objection.
Notwithstanding the foregoing comments, I do recommend "Deception Point." It's grippingly written.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
COMPLETELY DIFFERENT SUBJECT MATTER THAN DAVINCI OR ANGELS:
Dan Brown is now one of my favorite writers. Angels & Demons and the DaVinci code (which I thoroughly enjoyed) were the first and second of his books I read and this prompted me to be concerned that his attention to detail and crafting a wonderfully involved story was limited to Religious symbology and similar doctrines. Well, I had nothing to worry about.
MAIN STORY, VERY BRIEFLY:
Deception point revolves around a political campaign, NASA, geology and marine biology. Strange bedfellows aren't they, but it works.
Rachel Sexton a gister (yes, I spelled that right) for the government is contacted by the president. Her boss is concerned, it is for political manipulation as her father is a U.S. senator, the president's opponent in the upcoming election.
As the day's events unfold, Rachel is very divided as to who is being truthful or not. She is to be witness to a great discovery along with many famous scientists. Is the president banking on her family name or her reputation with data? Both could be true or it could be something else entirely.
When there are questions about the situation she is involved in, things get very complicated very fast and who are friends and enemies is not so clear cut.
CONSISTENT WITH DAN BROWN'S STYLE AND EXCELLENT WRITING:
As with any of Dan Brown's books, each chapter is brief well-crafted and builds up to a phenomenal story line. If you like a book (and I do) that brings in bit by bit all the main players and crafts their story until it interweaves in an amazing climax, this is the book for you. I personally am not politically oriented, know little about NASA and could care less about marine biology and geology, but I had difficultly putting this book down. Each section was riveting and each wanted me to read on.
Great job, when are you going to write more?
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on June 19, 2005
For my first online review Deception Points lends itself beautifully. It has political double-crossing, space and oceanic exploration, love, sex and the high expectation of turning the page quickly to find out what else could possibly happen in this jam-packed thriller.

President Zackery Herney is approaching running for reelection with a strong new opposition in Senator Sexton. Both are divided on the issue of huge spending for NASA to continue with government involvement and control or to be left to the private sector to finance. Someone is feeding information to Senator Sextons assistant that NASA is failing when the President announces that NASA has made a huge discovery. The story line keeps your adrenaline pumping and the pages turning whether you believe the findings or not! Dan Brown adds in well researched data and tosses in a bit of love and sex and you find yourself sad when the book comes to a close so quickly. A great thrill ride and worth your time.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
There are two ways to review this book. The first way is simply to say I read it without wanting to put it down as it was fast paced, exciting and a fun book to read. The second way is to say that it was based on a totally ridiculous premise and was way way over the top.
If you get hung up on technical problems, unrealistic scenarios, villains that make dumb mistakes and hero's that get rescued at the last second by miraculous means, then skip this book because it will just make you mad. If, however, you can look past the problems and just enjoy the story, you'll enjoy this novel as Brown is a strong story teller. It was a lot of fun to read and I look forward to the next one.
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