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The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America Paperback – August 15, 2000


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The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America + Pocket Constitution (Text from the U.S. Bicentennial Commission Edition) + Common Sense (Dover Thrift Editions)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 58 pages
  • Publisher: Cato Institute (August 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1882577981
  • ISBN-13: 978-1882577989
  • Product Dimensions: 4.8 x 3.5 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (188 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,423 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Take a minute to consider a gift that hasn’t gone out of style in more than 200 years." -- Wall Street Journal

"Who needs play-stations when you can give the kids Thomas Jefferson?" -- Independent (U.K.)

From the Publisher

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America’s founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket edition of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America. With more than three million copies in print, this edition’s influence has been observed far and wide. It has been held up by senators at press conferences and by representatives during floor debate; found in federal judicial chambers across the country; appeared at conferences on constitutionalism in Russia, Iraq, and elsewhere; and sold at U.S. Park Service stores, Restoration Hardware, and book stores around the country. It’s a perfect gift for friends and family. Order your copies today!

Customer Reviews

It contains just the Declaration and the Constitution themselves, as well as a concise and informative introduction.
Ben Geets
The small format makes it very handy for bringing with you wherever you go (it fits easily in your pocket and I also carry a copy with me in my laptop bag).
Mike Mertens
It's good to know your rights and how our Government (Not just Bush, ALL of Government) are taking them away from us.
Rob

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

88 of 90 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey B. Klaus on March 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
I have always been looking for a reference copy of the U.S. Consitution to carry with me. For me this volume is that reference. This volume is compact, well laid out, and contains no unwanted extraneous materials.
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165 of 186 people found the following review helpful By Kendal B. Hunter on February 1, 2002
Format: Paperback
These founding documents are like the Bible . . .often quoted, seldom read. In fact it is worse, since they are seldom read, when people quote-unquote "quote" them, they are actually spouting nonsense, as opposed to the political wisdom of the ages.
It is... imperative, therefore, that we should become familiar with these two philosophical pillars of political freedom. This book puts these heavenly banners and glorious standards into your hand-the truth is at your fingertips--to check up on the politicians. If they do anything crooked, keep in mind that it is our fault for not being aware and active in stopping them.
Don't be intimidated by the language. There is an old saying that Plato is easier to understand the Platonists. The original documents are easier to understand than the snake twisting that many lawyers and fanatics put to the documents. You asre smart enough to decide for yourself.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By E. Tobkes on March 8, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States is a great pocket reference source. I would recommend looking into "The Heritage Guide to the Constitution" as a partner to this book. "The Dec of Ind and the Con of the US" offers up no explaination of the Articles or of the Bill of Rights and Ammendments. This is why I would also recommend getting the Heritage Guide for a great explaination of everything. This pocket sized guide book is a great reference source for those of you who like to argue the Constitution around the dinner table. Just whip this little book out and you'll have the complete version of our Fore Fathers documents that created this great country right at your fingertips.
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88 of 109 people found the following review helpful By Greg Feirman on December 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is the American vision of what government should be. Many people think that America is a democracy but it is actually a constitutional democracy. The Constitution of the United States sets limits to the powers of government in Article 1, Section 8 (pgs 23-5). Outside of these enumerated powers the government has no authority to do anything else.

It really is a beautiful system of government. All law-making powers are vested in the Senate and House of Representatives. However, a president can check their power by vetoing any laws they pass, which they can then override by a 2/3 majority in both houses. The president's function is to "preserve, protect and defend the Constitution" and to the the Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States. The Supreme Court and other courts oversee the laws passed by the legislature and, I suppose, the actions of the president to make sure that they fall within the bounds set by the Constitution. Congress has the ability to add to the Constitution by passing amendments. And the Bill of Rights lays out a few rights of the people and states that are absolutely not to be infringed upon, though the enumerated powers already limits the power granted to the federal government.
Roger Pilon's brief Preface is about as much bang for the word as one could ask for. Check it out!
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Owen Hatteras on September 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
The Cato Institute--a libertarian think-tank in Washington, D.C.--deserves great praise for producing this handy, inexpensive, and durable pocket-sized edition of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. Dismayingly few people know the contents of these documents, and those who want to know typically ask for a book to read about them. However, it is far better--and takes less time--to read the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution than to read about them.

The great U.S. Supreme Court Justice Hugo L. Black used to carry a copy of the Constitution everywhere with him in his coat pocket. Thanks to the Cato Institute, everyone else can do the same.
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33 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Kelly H on August 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
About a year ago, I saw a movie called The Revolution Will Not Be Televised. The movie is about President Chavez in Venezuela and the failed coup attempt on his presidency. In the background coverage of his presidency, the filmmakers recounted how as President, he encouraged his citizens to read their brand new constitution and learn it. They interviewed some Venezuelans who did not know to read, but had learned to read by reading their constitution.

I was touched by this, but then I thought "how many Americans can say they've read the Constitution?" My guess is probably not many. And those that have only did it for school and have since forgotten much of what they learned. Personally, I remember having to memorize the Bill of Rights for a class, but that's about it.

So I bought a copy of the Constitution for myself and began reading it.

In a time when Congress is passing legislation that infringes upon the rights guaranteed us by our Constitution, it's important now more than ever that we read and understand it.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Steve on February 18, 2007
Format: Paperback
I read through this handy little book in one session and have used it as a reference on several occasions since. It's nice to quickly read the articles and amendments when I hear them referenced in the news or in conversation.

The thing I have enjoyed most about this is that by reading it I have corrected some of my misconceptions and re-learned a lot of what has faded out of my memory since I took American History over 20 years ago.
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