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Deep Winter Paperback – August 21, 2007


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"Act of God" by Jill Ciment
Part horror story, part screwball comedy, Ciment’s brilliant suspense novel looks at what happens when our lives—so seemingly set and ordered yet so precariously balanced—break down in the wake of calamity. See more
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"Act of God" by Jill Ciment
Part horror story, part screwball comedy, Ciment’s brilliant suspense novel looks at what happens when our lives—so seemingly set and ordered yet so precariously balanced—break down in the wake of calamity. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 660 pages
  • Publisher: Two Dogs Publishing; 1st edition (August 21, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615154417
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615154411
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 1.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (105 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,735,005 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Recently, I finished reading this book on my Kindle.
French Mackes Jr
Personally, I don't mind that the protagonist is a "Bible" Christian and quotes Scripture a few times.
Susan F. Peterson
So very much unneeded detail and so very little true character development.
Wendie Labarge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

315 of 360 people found the following review helpful By A Christy on August 19, 2009
Format: Paperback
I really wanted to like this book. I tried so very hard to like this book. Honest, I did. I'm a dystopia/utopia, post-apocalyptic, world is collapsing literature fan like no other. So to have a book being written by someone who is actually a person who understands preparedness that is not just a how-to was an exciting prospect.

Unfortunately, there is no amount of force that can make me like this book.

The story premise is good enough to have made a great book. The Drummonds, a family of 4, are hit by a massive earthquake in the PNW. While this may seem a local disaster, it is quickly followed by the rapid crash of the United States like a large house of cards. Financial messes of the past catch up with us and bank failures domino into a lack of imports without cash, insufficient coverages on debt and personal disasters as corporations fall. The Drummonds and most of the remaining members of their small community are left essentially alone without the massive aid that our country has sent to disaster areas in the past.

Without fuel, electricity and even structurally sound homes, they make do with what they have in creative ways. The community rallies, at least the good guys do, and through much they persevere and turn lawns into farms and spare parts into power.

Sounds good, right? I thought so too. But then I read the first page and my heart sunk. The editing in this book is so bad as to be non-existent. While I understand this is a self-published book, the author is on enough of the same message boards as I am to know that he had a vast resource at his fingertips just to check grammar if he so chose. The run on sentences, bad grammar, repetitive word choice and poor writing habits are obvious and distracting.
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58 of 69 people found the following review helpful By A. Buchanan on September 19, 2007
Format: Paperback
This first book in a trilogy details how a small family survives one disaster after another. It starts with a major quake in the pacific northwest which levels the city Spokane, Washington (where the story is set). The family picks up the pieces, gathers more family, and continues to deal with more disasters: blizzards, volcanic ash, flu epidemic, fallout from a distant nuclear war, economic meltdown, war with Mexico, looters, profiteers, and the specter of takeover by the military. Not everyone who reads this novel will agree with the political viewpoint of main character, or the plausibility of the disasters. However, this should be a must read for anyone concerned with what might happen and how best to prepare for, and react to, such events.
More informative than a pamphlet, more thought provoking than many news shows, and more entertaining than most TV shows.
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44 of 53 people found the following review helpful By charmdimsure on March 19, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First let me say: I detest survival novels where the characters just "magically" happen to have every single thing they're ever going to need to survive the breakdown of society/technology. There's little to no drama, bravery or gallantry involved if you just happen to have enough preserved food, gallons of gasoline, medicines and all the warm clothing/boots/gloves and camping gear you'll need to get you through.

The beginning of this book reads like an inventory. The man and his family have just been through a [literally] earth-shattering experience and he's taking inventory. And smug. This character is so very, very smug in his absolute certainty that his Christian values and hard work have led him to purchase all the things that he and his family will need to survive. Within a couple chapters I didn't like him. After five or six, I actively detested him.

The main character, Rick Drummond, is overbearing, obnoxious and condescending. The wife is a cipher. The daughter is there only for Rick to have his "heh heh, teen girls are so self-centered" moments and apparently his son is only there so Rick can demonstrate "manly men doing manly things"...oh, and the son is apparently there to tote and carry on order. Rick Drummond makes a point of telling us that only a fool lives "paycheck to paycheck" when he magnanimously goes over to help his neighbors, a young couple with small children...despite the fact that most young couples live "paycheck to paycheck" when they're starting out. The author never explains how this family -- who appear to be an average middle class family -- has managed to accumulate several hundred grand worth of tools, equipment, food, gasoline, vehicles for every purpose, camping gear and trailers, etc.
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48 of 61 people found the following review helpful By A Jones on April 6, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the worst yet. I am 60 percent through it and have been reading on in hopes that the ceiling will fall in on this group and end my suffering. The premise, massive earthquake and subsequent disasters, offers broad scope for a good novel. Unfortunately, this author has no imagination and cannot write. The grammatical errors were offensive. Over and over we read...."brought coffee to Ron and I." "Ron (or whoever) and I" as objects of prepositions occurs consistently throughout the book. I learned the difference in the 3rd grade. There are spelling errors, simple plurals with apostrophes (like the girl's came in) and no apostrophes on possessives (such as Rons boots). Putting that mess aside, this reads like hardware/camping/hunting equipment warehouse inventory. Page after page we read excruciatingly boring lists of stuff, model numbers, where the items was bought, by whom, for how much... Nothing much happens to these folks, either; they just mess around with their massive hoard of supplies, pat themselves on the back - well, the main guy, Rick, does - about their smarts - and serve up French roast coffee and homemade whole grain pancakes. Rick is an arrogant, self-rightous "lucky me, I'm saved" Christian. He looks down on everyone. He's unlikeable and the rest of the characters are voids. They seem to have no real reaction to what's going on. The dialogue is painfully stupid and boring. This is a survival manual poorly disguised as a novel, one for wealthy, SAVED Christians. This guy is wealthy, don't kid yourself, because all that equipment he's got cost plenty. SAVE yourself from this book. Don't bother with it.
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