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144 of 150 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book is awesome! Of the recipes I've tried, I've been amazed by how good they taste, how light and "normal" they are. These are practical recipes for a family with small children, yet cater to "grown up" palettes as well. The dishes make me feel like I'm not missing anything by avoiding gluten, which makes it easy to avoid the bad stuff. The blueberry waffle recipe was dinner last night, and I closed my eyes and sighed with delight as I bit into a truly delicious waffle for the first time since going gluten free. No mix I've tried even comes close! That one recipe alone was worth the cost of the book, but of course there are many more that are simply divine. I highly recommend this book! I feel that Elizabeth has done the hard work for me, that I get to benefit from her decade of experience in finding and creating good recipes, and I look forward to her future publications on the topic. She knows what she's doing in a gluten free kitchen! Thank you! It's a wonderful book, and I will be referring it to all of my friends and family.
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72 of 77 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2012
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I've done the waffles, the pancakes and the yellow cupcakes. All have been a hit. I can tell by looking thru some of the other recipes that they are very high in refined starch and sugar which is a problem for anyone battling blood sugar issues But this is usual and normal for gluten free recipes due to the flour starch blends used to replicate gluten's properties. Her recipes actually attempt to correct the problem a bit by adding more fiber.

Where this book shines in comparison with other gluten free books, is that the recipes taste great, the food really does look, feel and taste like the original gluten containing version, only a bit better even. Nicely done!

I wish the nutritional info was included. I calculated the carbs myself for those recipes and the muffins. Surprisingly the muffins were higher in calories and carbs than the cupcakes, no doubt due to the coconut flour. Because of the lack of nutrition info, I'm knocking this down one star. It's months later, and I'm finding that unless I've calculated those carbs and fiber etc, I'm not bothering with the recipes. I have other cookbooks now that have the nutrient info already done for me. Gluten free involves a lot of carbs, heavily refined and the carb content can be a problem for those with diabetes or those who are using a low carb diet to control auto immune issues other than celiac. Both diabetes and auto immune disorders occur in the celiac population at a fairly high rate along with allergies.

I own Betty Hagman's Gluten Free Gourmet books 1 and 2 as well as Carol Fenster's 1000 Gluten Free Recipes plus a few other G Free cookbooks. Bette Hagman's newer editions all contain nutrient info, and some of Carol Fenster's along with the new Betty Crocker Gluten Free cookbook.

If you hope this book will have recipes for basics like breads, biscuits or tortillas, you will be disappointed. Many of her recipes assume you have access to gluten free breads, bagels, tortillas etc. For those I suggest Carol Fenster 1000 Gluten Free recipes. That book has a slick recipe for French Bread along with many other basic standards and doesn't assume you have access to anything ready made.

My own aim in my kitchen has been to produce easy food that tastes as good as the gluten version, has some fiber to it (a common problem with gluten free flours is the high carb content and lack of fiber), won't put me into carb overload and basically doesn't cost a second mortgage to feed everyone with since I'm not going to have a split kitchen cooking separate gluten free things for me and "normal" stuff for the rest.

Hence the need for normal good tasting foods. This book is a great addition to my gluten free cookbook library. But not as the primary book to look up how to make a gluten free version of everything. For that, Carol Fenster is better. For a smaller simpler "does it all" try the Betty Crocker gluten free cookbook which has the nutrient info in sidebars with each recipe.

And as for the sugar/refined carbs problem, this isn't a solution nor does she try to be. She does try to use higher fiber flours like sorghum, brown rice, black bean flour, and millet, and she occasionally uses coconut flour, flax seeds ground in a coffee mill, but as a whole these are not going to be appropriate for anyone needing to keep sugars down. It is a good start though, and like Carol Fenster, she seems aware of the problems of eating too much overly refined starch.

For example she does use coconut flour (which is high in fiber and low in carbs) but it's benefits are diluted by added sugar, other flours and starches. In the yellow cake/cupcakes, I used 1/4 cup of sugar and 3/4 cup of Splenda. That was a little too sweet still so I think it would work with less Splenda. I know you need sugar for texture too, so that is why I kept some in.

Nothing is perfect. She did what she set out to do, create a family friendly cookbook that doesn't have to apologize for it's gluten free recipes. They are tasty and work well. Nobody would know the difference. And most cookbook recipes are sweeter than I like, which is easy to fix.

But if you are primarily looking for something that is easier on the blood sugar with high fiber and gluten free then try Bruce Fife's book on baking with coconut flour or "20 Incredible Coconut Flour Recipes by Marissa Paine" as they might be a better fit. I really like those two. Also look at any of the Primal or Paleo cookbooks as they avoid grains, but do create things with coconut or almond flour.

I don't think a single cookbook can be all things to all people. This book does a very good job of creating family pleasing foods that everyone can enjoy. No need to inform guests that the reason the cake is gritty is because it's gluten free.

You don't have to apologize for or explain this food. For example Elizabeth's Yellow Cake is delicious, tender and really really tasty! This book delivers on it's promise to create the foods that people like to eat, just that they also happen to be gluten free. Well done.
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88 of 96 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I have a couple of other gluten free cookbooks and they are more like Betty Crocker goes gluten free. This book is more contemporary and the recipes are tasty. My only complaint is that, with the exception of the salads, there is no nutritional information. That information would have made this 5 stars.
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102 of 116 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover
My daughter was diagnosed with celiac disease as a toddler, 18 years ago. At that time, resources for celiac disease and a gluten-free lifestyle were all but nonexistent. Gluten-free flour options, mixes for home baking, and ready-to-eat products were rare, lousy, and expensive. The local stores, except for health food markets, had nothing to offer. Home cooking would be a necessity for my daughter, and, having come from a tradition of good cooks back several generations, I took on that challenge happily despite the frustrations. I caught Ms. Hasselbeck on The Chew a few weeks ago and the discussion of the book made me want to add another gluten-free cookbook to my daughter's growing collection. I can't begin to say how disappointed I am just from glancing through the book. First, why publishers and cookbook authors think celiacs and those who need to eat gluten-free (GF) need a special cookbook to tell them how to make a salad or a simple entree is beyond me. Spend a couple hours reading online, and one can learn how to substitute the tricky ingredients--the ones that would be GF but for some hidden surprise, such as the wheat in soy sauce--and avoid flour. We do not need a recipe that tells us how to make fajitas by putting the word "gluten-free" in front of ingredients that commonly have hidden gluten and directing us to use a corn tortilla. Really? Like we couldn't have figured that out? And then decided that corn tortillas are a nasty, unpleasant substitute for flour tortillas. What we need then is a recipe for a gluten-free tortilla that is palatable and can then be used in other recipes and contexts. We don't need a pasta main course that tells us how to make marinara or bolongnese, which can easily be made gluten-free from just about any cookbook or recipe web site, but a recipe for pasta that doesn't fall apart. A french toast recipe that starts with gluten-free bread that one could find or adapt just about anywhere? Nope, not that either. To further complicate the picture, Ms. Hasselbeck came up with several gluten-free flour blends. I have not tried them yet. They might be fabulous. However, the beginning of the book presents mixtures one can make up and keep on hand for future use, which is a great idea, except that if I really need four or five different flour blends, then I need more containers, more room in my pantry (actually, I prefer to freeze GF flour), and more patience than I can muster. My daughter will certainly need a bigger kitchen in her dorm room. Worse, when you get back to the end of the book where the few recipes for baked goods are tucked away, you find that the recipes do not call for some amount of the premixed blends but for the ingredients themselves. One either has to total up the amounts of the various flours to use the blends one already has on hand or go back to the unblended ingredients.

My advice for people who are starting out on a GF diet is to start very simple. Adapt your own favorite, tried-and-true recipes by substituting GF flours and other GF ingredients. We've made GF crepes--the original French recipe in fact uses cornstarch and not flour--pancakes, cupcakes, cakes, cookies, brownies; we've done breaded and fried chicken, donuts, funnel cakes, thickened soups and stews (try blended soups or thicken with GF instant mashed potato flakes instead of starting with a roux), slow-cooker creations, and so on. There might very well be good recipes in this book, but there's so little content that you can't get without a little thought and creativity that it's absolutely not worth the purchase price.
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76 of 88 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I have tried four recipes in Deliciously G Free so far, and they have all been outstanding. My kids thought that the Mango Fandango Shake tasted just like ice cream, and I LOVED the Black Forest Shake. Last night I made up a big double batch of the Sweet and Sour Chicken (yummy), and tonight I'm making the Beef and Broccoli. The Egg Muffins were also a big hit.

Although Elisabeth doesn't specifically annotate this, many of her recipes are both gluten and casein free. If your family was dealing with Autism Spectrum Disorder and cooking for a GF/CF diet, this book would have lots of kid friendly options for you. I'm going to be sharing this review on my blog!

Update: 1/20/12

I have now also tried the Beef and Broccoli recipe on page 121. It was excellent, but I didn't think the can of black beans was supposed to be there, so I just skipped that part. The pulled pork sandwiches on page 158 were good, and were an easy crock-pot dinner. The chocolate chip cookie recipe on page 215 has also been a hit, but does require a lot of non-standard flours. Luckily we live next to a natural foods co-op, and I have easy access to things like millet flour and Xanthan gum.

A final thing I'd like to point out is that on page 21 Elisabeth talks about mixing up large batches of "power flours" to make baking easier, and specifically mentions pancakes and waffles. But then there aren't any recipes for pancake and waffle "power flour" mixes. A typo?
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
on March 30, 2012
Format: Hardcover
- All cookbooks need lots of pictures. A gluten free cookbook needs even more pictures. This cookbook has VERY few pictures.
- Recipes for burgers and sliders do have pics and they look great - there are no recipes for the buns.
- I did try the Corn Fritters and they were very good.
- Most of the recipes seem to be 'normal' food with the words gluten free thrown in
- I have been gluten, dairy and soy free for over a year and have found some really good Gluten-Free cookbooks - this is NOT one of them.
- I am glad that I checked this book out of the library before I purchased it.
- If I bought this book used for $5.00 I would fell that I had overpaid.
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35 of 42 people found the following review helpful
on January 25, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I bought this book, at amazon.con, for my sister-in-law who lives in Portugal. Gluten Free pre made items are very hard to fine there. She is making her own bread but can't get some of the necessary flours there. When Ms. Hasselbeck mentioned on The View that she had included all the mixes of different flours, I assumed she would have included bread. The mixes are only for brownies, devil's food cake, yellow cake, and chocolate chip cookies. I did find a biscuit recipe and one for banana bread. She does include some ideas of how to live gluten free and she does a good job of informing the reader about the different kinds of flour available to cook gluten-free with. She does assume you will buy gluten free pasta's and breads at the store. That's fine if you live in a large city and can find them. In smaller towns, good luck. The Internet is the nearest store.

Most of recipes she includes are good basic recipes but are the same as you can find online or in any cook book. I'll keep the book and send it on to my sister-in-law in Portugal but I wish there had been a good bread recipe included.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on January 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I really liked this book. What I liked about it was, the book broke down the different flours and how they should be used for what type of baking. I have been going gluten free for 4 years but that was never explained. It was so easy and concise. I bought the book yesterday and there were alot of recipes in there I am excited to try. I made the French toast today and it was AMAZING. My whole family loved it. I made it on UDI bread. It was AWESOME. I can't wait to try more.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on March 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book and am so pleased with it. I read a review complaining that she doesn't tell you when to use the premixed flours if you premix her recommendations. That is not true. Each mix is for one specific recipe (brownies, yellow cupcakes, etc). On the side of that particular recipe, she tells you if you premixed the flour- how much to use. I read another comment about bread recipes. The book didn't promise bread recipes and I didn't buy it thinking there would be some of those in there. I bought the book merely for the fact that it had so many of my favorite meals but in the gluten free tasty version. I also bought it because I had no idea where to start with gluten free baking. I'm excited to try some of those recipes this weekend. The book is full of information that I found extremely helpful because let's be honest, with my schedule- I do not have as much time as I would like to research every single thing about gluten free. This book compiles information and her own cooking/baking experiences.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I purchased this book hoping to learn flour mixture alternatives, not just being told to go buy gluten free buns, breads, or just regular recipes that never had gluten even in them. Anyone can write these recipes, there were a few recipes that were good with flour mixtures like Chicken Marsala, but over 3/4 of the book she just tells you to go buy gluten free products for her recipe. If you really want a great baking book that fulfills every wish for learning gluten free baking purchase "GLUTEN FREE BAKING CLASSICS BY ANNALISE ROBERTS you will not be disappointed. I have never written a review before but felt I really needed to for this disappointing book.
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