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7
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None of the answers below are helpful. A relatively modern home or apartment (built in the last 50 years or later) will provide standard 110 V wall outlets where you should plug in the heater. The standard maximum load provided for each wall outlet is typically 16 Amp. If the unit actually pulls no more than 12.5 Amps you should use only one of these heaters PER CIRCUIT (not per wall outlet because if there are several in a room they are probably wired in parallel and are wired to the same breaker. If your circuit breaker for this particular location is 16 Amp (no matter whether there are one or more outlets in that room) then no matter into which outlet you plug it, you can only use a total of ONE heater in that room. It is unlikely that your wall outlets are protected by circuit breakers larger than 16 Amps. For those adventurous souls who think they are outsmarting the system by just replacing the 16 Amp Breaker (which you can buy at Home Depot for a song) with a higher rated one, say, 35 Amp at 110 V, you may have several problems. Example: The wire sizes going to the room in question may bee sized to work with the breaker size, as they should. If you double the breaker size in Amp and then run two or even three of these heaters (or equivalent loads like a vacuum cleaner or a steam iron) you may not trip the bigger breaker(35 Amp in my example) but you might overload the wires and cause them to heat up to a point where a hazard may be created (like burning down the house for example). So don't mess with the breaker unless you really know what you are doing. And remember, if you are modifying the code compliant home wiring and the house burns down the insurance inspectors will find out (they always do) your home insurance is voided. So be sensible and plug in one heater per circuit (hopefully the next room isn't on the same circuit should you plan to put another heater into an adjacent room.) It is easy to find out whether your room outlets are all on the same circuit by plugging in an appliance (hair dryer or table lamp) and then turning on and off your 16 Amp breakers until the appliance turns off. That's the breaker serving that outlet where you plugged in your appliance. You could then go around the room (or even adjacent rooms) and repeat the process. This simple way lets you find out for sure which outlets are on that same circuit (there is one circuit breaker per circuit, no more and no less). And remember, you probably already have other users on that circuit like your TV or HiFi gear, a floor or table lamp etc. Just add up the amps. Piece of cake. There is a lot more that could be said about this topic such as momentary overload (appliance being rated at 12.5 Amp but when turned on drawing significantly higher amps for a brief moment. This would trip your breaker even though when adding up all your loads on a given circuit you are not exceeding the 16 Amp. This usually is more of a problem with motors (washers, dryers, hair dryers, pumps, microwaves etc). Good luck and don't burn the house down, you hear? Hans
Jan 6, 2014 by R. Sinkovec
3
votes
Yes. You can set heater, for example, to turn on at 0800, then off at 1000 then back on at 1200 etc. It is a 24hr timer. It has l little pins or toggles that you set on or off. So, for example, if you wanted heater "on" at 0800 and keep it on running/heating until 8pm you just set the toggles "on" for that total time period. So, for me, I set heater to come on at 0500 just a bit before I wake, and I set it to turn off at 0600 cause I leave for work, then I it set to come back on at 0730 when I get home and I have it set to be off thru the night when I sleep. You can set it different to accomodate your schedule etc. Most heaters are set to come "on" at a certain time and go off at another time and only that. This heater you have total flexibility. To get an idea you can look at some of the xmas tree light timers on the market or the house light timers that people buy to have their lights come on and off if they arent home. You plug your Xmas lights or your living room lamp into these socket adapter timers and then your lights will come on and go off when you want. This heater is the same idea. Its totally easy. It also has some settings/thermostat for the heat levels (lower heat or higher heat). Im pretty picky and when my first heater died. I re-researched heaters and again ended up with this one. I think on amazons picture you may be able to zoom in on the timer....toggles. This heater also has a thermostat that will have it come on if room hits a low temp and go off if room is warm enough but you can change that. Some other heaters are set to do this and you cant control or set that. The reason I dont like this is that rooms/drafts/temps vary and your heater can be on more that you want it etc. I do want to mention that this heater makes snapping /creaking sounds when it heats up but thats just the oil etc inside heating up and this goes away. When you first get this heater new I put it outside covered deck(not wet area) (I live in condo) or you could put in your garage and I run it on high settings for several hours to sort of get "new" smell to burn off. After that its fabulous and you only have to do this when you first get it. Sorry this is so long. :-) hope it makes sense.
Oct 21, 2014 by KAZ
1
vote
Usually a bedroom or a closed off room... 12x12 which is what we use it for. It is a space heater for a reason. open space[2 ajoining rooms] won't cut it. it will run forever we also use a thermostat that we plug the unit into and we have it set at 69 degrees to kick on/off at night.
Oct 24, 2013 by tony
1
vote
400 square feet within 20 min on full blast. holds heat well in the room!
Oct 24, 2013 by Thew
1
vote
26" high, 7" deep and about 14" wide. Sleek design.
Jan 5, 2014 by A. Baeza
1
vote
Yes, It is very safe, there is no exposed heating element, no flame, no power fan. Just don't drop it into the bathtub while you (or someone else) is in it!
Feb 17, 2013 by Karl Reutling
1
vote
It might blister a 1 year old on the 1500 watt setting. The sides are less hot than the top so it might be OK even on that level. An adult would take their hand away after a few seconds with no burn. You could use a lower power setting; this one allows selecting 700/900/1500 watts. On 700 or 900 I doubt it would be a problem.
Dec 11, 2010 by S. Payne
1
vote
I'd like to know also what people think between the TRR0715 and the TRD0715T? Its seems people are complaining about the noise of the TRR0715. Doesn't the TRD0715T make the same noise?
Jan 16, 2007 by J. E. Palmer
1
vote
My nursery is around 180 square feet give or take. The unit brings the temp up in about 20 minutes. I bet it could warm up a room twice this size without issue.
Dec 9, 2013 by Randall Marcellus
1
vote
cost to operate Oct 29, 2013
It is a very inexpensive heater to operate. It keeps the bathroom tile floor warm and the room comfortable.
Oct 30, 2013 by C. Gallagher
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