Buy Used
$10.46
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Regular shelf-wear. Book may have signs of wear on the edges, covers, and/or corners. Some pages may have highlighting or writing. Overall, book will be in highly readable condition. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Demo Paperback – July 8, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
Paperback, July 8, 2008
$17.01 $2.85

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (July 8, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401216218
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401216214
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 6.8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,047,035 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* After only a few glances, you grok why indie-comics mavens rave about the 12-issue comic Demo. Cloonan's artwork progresses from strength to strength, beginning as an Americanized take on grunge manga (big eyes, blank faces, bristling or moppy or no hair, lots of little-line detail) in stark black and white, proceeding through reduced lineation and varying amounts of shading to selectively mounting wholly drawn figures on manipulated photo imagery in the last three stories. Also employing a huge range of angles-of-vision and perspective points, it looks like a billion bucks. The story lines aren't bad, either. They're about late-teens-to-early-thirties crises of separation from home, lover, or way of life. Early on, protagonists have scary psychokinetic powers, such as killing with a spoken word or concentrated rage and shape-shifting according to others' expectations. Writer Wood soon modified and eventually dropped that conceit. The hapless young father in the story excerpted for the inaugural Year's Best Graphic Novels, Comics & Manga (2006) is just a never-miss rifle shot, and the three twentysomethings in the especially effective "Midnight to Six" are unusual only in having stuck to "The Slacker Pledge" they signed in eighth grade. Lacking recurring characters, Demo altogether is less reminiscent of other comics series than of a thematic rather than continuous-narrative novel, such as John Horne Burns' The Gallery (1947). High praise, maybe, but deserving. Ray Olson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Multiple Eisner Award-nominee Brian Wood released his first series, Channel Zero, to considerable critical acclaim in 1997 and has gone on to create hard-hitting original series such as DMZ, Northlanders, The Couriers, and The Massive. Adding to that body of work, he's also written some of the biggest titles in pop culture, with work on Star Wars, Conan The Barbarian, Lord Of The Rings and The X-Men. The author lives in Brooklyn, N.Y.. The author lives in Brooklyn, NY.

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
11
4 star
5
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 17 customer reviews
You will be left thinking after every story here, I can guarantee that.
Cai Yixin Jeremy
With DEMO Brian Wood and Becky Cloonan present an amazing set of dark stories with brilliant black/white art.
Amazon Customer
Imagine a story where superpowers take a backseat to the heart and that is Demo.
Nicholas Zinn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By German Salazar on December 31, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Come to think about it, I don't remember how I found about DEMO. I somehow ended up pre-ordering the book three months ago without any expectations other than finding content as different from typical American comic as possible.

There are 12 short stories. After reading 3 of them I stopped in bewilderment. an hour later, I still don't know exactly what I feel about this work.

To put it in ordinary terms, there is very solid and unorthodox storytelling. The script is intelligent, unapologetic and sort of naturalistic in its approach to theme. The stories themselves are... what to say; the Amazon description says it's a collection of "stories of conflicted teens grappling with love, loss, and the joy of finding your own way in life" but that's just a bland and dumb description. It doesn't cut it; it doesn't encompass what this book is about. I can't categorize it myself, so I won't.

If anything, I'd say these stories break with the trivialities and clichéd themes seen in comic books for decades. This is stuff of the new century; this is material that speaks to the progressive and subversive mindset of a new an evolving generation. This is not about teenagers and their `angst-ridden antics'. There's a certain social commentary, it's hidden within the characters behavior and psychological dynamics going on around them. I'll just say that it struck me deeply. I felt as though I was identifying parts of my fragmented spirit, as though when I read, I looked through a mirror and I recognized the misery and virtue of my ordinary human experience.

The visual syntax of Becky's art is quite unique. She crafted a style that stands out (and odd) in the American comic book store.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on June 30, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With DEMO Brian Wood and Becky Cloonan present an amazing set of dark stories with brilliant black/white art. Each story is short but telling, as we see several teens coping with the rougher side of having superpowers. This is much better reading and art than can be found in the similar Marvel comic NYX. I highly recommend this collection over the mainstream's version as it has more grit and more heart.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael K. Smith TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
I read a lot of graphic novels -- actual stories, not just compiled superhero comics -- and I rarely come across anything this literary. Most of these twelve stories could easily have been published, without pictures, in a "little" magazine somewhere. The intriguing thing is how they evolve, first to last, from "NYC" and "Bad Blood," which actually are about not-necessarily-super powers with a Rod Serling twist, to "One Shot, Don't Miss" and "Breaking Up" and "Damaged," which will stay with you a long, long time. And the last panel of the last story will truly grab you by the throat. Amazing writing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 25, 2008
Format: Paperback
I got this comic out of randomness without knowing the demographic it was aiming for, or anything really. Aside from some generally positive reviews.

Its an honest manga-esque comic book about troubled teenagers, passing through situations that are possibly somewhat relatable for any individual during that period in ones life. Some of the stories are well written, some involving super powers, and some not so great. Its a demographic meant for teens, young adults, i being 20.

You could really see the evolution Brain wood takes from his earliest stories - "NYC", to "Bad blood", which arguably any angsty fanboy could conjure up, to a slightly more sophisticated evolution to stories that offer substantial insights on the young adult mind: "what you wish for", "girl you want", and finally working towards thrilling, engaging stories, "One shot, don't miss", "Breaking up" and so on, were Wood truly comes to form. "Midnight to six" was refreshing, it seems to be the only light story in the whole collection, but really isn't that light if you think about it. Stories such as "Mixed tape" for example, are corny and overly sentimental.

People would highly disagree, but i did find alot of the stories abit angsty. And it's true, the whole book is spilled with anxiety.

Some of the more anime influenced artwork which i hadn't expected, turned me off. If that was the case, i was running on the story to take me through it. The anime artwork is strange to me, simply because it doesn't feel japanese, but it looks japanese. While the compositions and panel arrangements are quite strong, the problem to me is mainly due to the fact that traditional manga isn't as sketchy looking and as arguably Lazily drawn and constructed as DEMO's illustrations.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nicholas Zinn on September 13, 2006
Format: Paperback
I read these stories when they were coming out as single issues a few years back. Picking up the collection, I forgot how compelling and different each story is. The major theme linking all of the stories is people with a dilema and some "power" that pushes the story to explore themselves. Each chapter is a stand alone story, yet a common idea runs through the whole book-that no matter what gifts we have about us it's how we use them. Some stories are happy, others depressing, but all have an air of truth that most of us can relate to.

I enjoy the rough, punkesque feel that some of the tales have. It's an atmosphere of being an outsider regardless of the situation and how the individual deals with it. Becky Cloonan's art is wonderful and changes in regards as to what the situations is. It can feel like manga, independent, or stylized but never repeats any of the other chapters. She amazed me by doing so much with so few pages. Wood's writing is quick, to the point and doesn't weigh down the flow. He reminds me of what it's like to be younger, struggling with growing up, fighting the world and ourselves to become something more. Each story plays up emotions ranging from love to hate to empathy to pride and more. Imagine a story where superpowers take a backseat to the heart and that is Demo.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?