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Democracy And Education Paperback – December 12, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 198 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Brown (December 12, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 161382095X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1613820957
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #715,233 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Dewey (1859 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been very influential to education and social reform. Dewey, along with Charles Sanders Peirce and William James, is recognized as one of the founders of the philosophy of pragmatism and of functional psychology. He was a major representative of the progressive and progressive populist philosophies of schooling during the first half of the 20th century in the USA. Although Dewey is known best for his publications concerning education, he also wrote about many other topics, including experience and nature, art and experience, logic and inquiry, democracy, and ethics. In his advocacy of democracy, Dewey considered two fundamental elements schools and civil society as being major topics needing attention and reconstruction to encourage experimental intelligence and plurality. Dewey asserted that complete democracy was to be obtained not just by extending voting rights but also by ensuring that there exists a fully-formed public opinion, accomplished by effective communication among citizens, experts, and politicians, with the latter being accountable for the policies they adopt.

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Customer Reviews

You would really hurt your eyes trying to get through this book.
outdooredtim
It is a cheap ebook / online edition of the book in a cheap hardcover binding.
M. Louis
There is no space to write notes, not even at the bottom of the page.
Ed Filio

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

95 of 110 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
Dewey's classic work, although tedious at times, is a cogent and landmark exposition of progressive educational theory. Democracy for Dewey was both a means and an end to the building of a good and just society. In this regard he sought to develop strategies and methods for training students through learning and discipline to become socially responsible adults and conscientious citizens concerned with the rights of others and the common good and to be equipped with the knowledge and technical skills to be productive members of society in the context of our modern industrial world. Dewey is truly a giant not only of modern educational theory but of progressive humanitarian thought generally. Those who disparage him in a knee jerk fashion out of a misguided effort to trash the "liberal establishment," like the Intercollegiate Scholastic Insititute (ISI) which named "Democracy and Education" as one of the five worst books of the 20th Century, have radically misconstrued Dewey's views which merit serious study and application in practice. Dewey was truly one of the great Americans of the last century of which all people of good will can be proud.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By C. Goss on February 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
Fantastic; a book I would recommend to just about anyone. To address some of the critics mentioned in the other reviews: RE: "Dewey Dogma" (1) There is absolutely no pretense of an application of the scientific method, hence there can be no mis-application; (2) This book strikes me personally as one of the least dogmatic things I've ever read in my life. The ideas are fresh, original, and beautiful crafted and ordered; (3) "Education is Socialization" - an equation of broadly construed "-tions" that results in a statement that one can neither agree nor disagree with.

I could be wrong, but nowhere did I read these ideas as explicit recommendations to be implemented, rather I read this book as a general exploration of educational aims and processes. Dewey (justifiably in my opinion) explores closely connected concepts which I imagine are left out of other educational texts, which is why some with pre-professional backgrounds in education count the length and depth of this book as a negative.

His writing, in my opinion, is clear and concise (at least in comparison with other great philosophers) - writing that I would personally aspire to. His ideas, and I can't say this enough, are some of the most original I've come across. We didn't really cover the pragmatists in any of my philosophy classes. Reading this makes me wish we had.
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32 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Hairy Growler on July 18, 1998
Format: Paperback
Perhaps the fact that this great work receives so little attention is indicative of what ails education: educators focus their attention on all the latest drivel concerning education while only paying lip service to Dewey, who remains the highest-ranking educational philosopher. It pains me to hear and read bungling educators mindlessly parrot Dewey's catch phrases (e.g., "learning by doing") while pushing educational doctrines completely antithetical to Dewey's ideas. Dewey had it right, but is grossly misunderstood by the bozos who vapidly regurgitate his words and phrases. In other words, I recommend that you go to the source.
If you are in any way concerned with or interested in education and happen to stumble upon this lonely page, do yourself, your kids, and/or your students a favor and study this book carefully; It eclipses all other books on education.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Ed Filio on April 19, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This edition of the book is absolutely awful. The type is small and printed in a grayish fuzzy font that is hard to read. The margins are almost nonexistent. There is no space to write notes, not even at the bottom of the page. You will notice that this book is only 194 pages, whereas I recently found a very good used copy that is 378 pages. Both are unabridged, but in this edition the text is crammed onto the pages. Also, just scanning through the book today I quickly found two typos. Avoid this cheaply constructed edition. I sincerely hope Amazon stops selling it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By M. Louis on August 2, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Hello all.
First off, this work is an important work of Dewey, someone I deeply respect; HOWEVER....
Whatever you do, do not buy this hardcover edition of Democracy and Education. It is a cheap ebook / online edition of the book in a cheap hardcover binding. The text literally looks like it was printed off of a website. The font is horrible, the text is small, and there is no space between the lines. It is honestly disgusting to look at especially for the price of nearly 30 dollars. Buy another edition or a paperback copy if you really want to feel like you have a REAL book.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
There are variety of editions of this title. As another reviewer noted, some of the editions are poorly editted and formatted.
I have this edition of Democracy And Education : Complete And Unabridged (please click the link) and I can tell you that it is both nicely formatted and editted. So because you want it, pick the correct edition.
Also, the edition I have is called "Complete and Unabridged", unlike some other editions which don't make that claim.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dienne TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 6, 2012
Format: Paperback
[Note: I checked this book out at the library and I cannot find the edition I read; therefore this review is solely about the book and does not touch on concerns mentioned by other reviewers regarding this particular edition]

Let me start by saying that smarter people than me have tried and filed to summarize and paraphrase John Dewey. I could read this book several more times and still not comprehend the full import of Dewey's work. This is not merely a book about education, but rather a complete philosophy of education which, of necessity, is a philosophy of individual life in the social world. Like any good philosopher, Dewey builds his argument brick by brick, each brick resting squarely on the bricks beneath it. One cannot fully comprehend and appreciate the entire structure until one has examined each brick in the composition and the logical relationship among the bricks. By necessity, a brief review of a work such as this will leave out many bricks and breeze over the connections from brick to brick. Any inaccuracies thus resulting are my own and not Dewey's failure to construct a solid argument.

To the extent this book can be summed up, the overriding theme is that much confusion and debate regarding education (and, indeed, much of life), stem from false dualisms, such as the dichotomy between thinking and doing, mind and body, individual and society. Once we recognize that those dualisms are in fact simply interacting forces which shape individual experience and development, the aims, role, materials and methods of education become almost self-evident.

Dewey begins his argument with an exploration of early childhood. From earliest days, all learning is experience, and all experience is learning.
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