Buy New
$66.62
Qty:1
  • List Price: $75.00
  • Save: $8.38 (11%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Democratic Governance and... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $1.30
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Democratic Governance and International Law Paperback – May 29, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$66.62
$66.62 $18.95


Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (May 29, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521667968
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521667968
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,854,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This thought provoking book reflects a diversiyt of scholarly opinions on the relationship between democratic governance and international law." International Law & Trade Perspective

"This thought provoking book reflects a diversity of scholarly opinions on the relationship between democratic governance and international law." International Law & Trade Perspective

"Any publication that can serve as a guiding light through these complex issues is to be strongly welcomed. Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth have produced just such a book... Democratic Governance and International Law is to be highly recommended to everyone with a concern for the future development of international law." Richard A. Barnes

Book Description

This book considers how the post-Cold War democratic revolution has affected international law. Traditionally, international law said little about the way in which governments were chosen. In the 1990s, however, international law has been deployed to encourage transitions to democracy, and to justify the armed expulsion of military juntas that overthrow elected regimes. In this volume, leading international legal scholars assess this change in international law and ask whether a commitment to democracy is consistent with the structure and rules of the international legal system.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gautner on February 25, 2003
Format: Paperback
Suppose you were living in a village of thirteen people. You and your neighbors elected one person to be the mayor of your village, and made virtually all public decisions by referendums allowing your mayor to put your decisions into action. You would invariably manage few resources, and exert little power on the communities around you; however, you would have a substantial degree of control in your affairs. Now suppose you moved to a village of approximately 63 billion. You now have a village council, a mayor, a local representative, a governor, a national representative, a president or prime minister, and an international representative. There are thousands of issues decided each day, some of these are legislative issues bound to become laws, some judicial decisions that will have legal bearing - all will effect you and your life. Consequently, the degree of control you can exert over your own affairs has virtually evaporated. What happened to the spread of liberal democracy? This much needed text answers these questions with lucid professionalism and keen insight. In a world where the theory of a "global village" is increasingly and increasingly convincingly being advanced, international law theoretically also becomes increasingly necessary - this global village is interdependent, and thus there must be universality to the laws. Messrs. Fox and Roth provide a practical response to theory with this excellent text, which is divided up into five parts: (1) the normative foundations of a right to political participation; (2) democracy and inter-state relations; (3) democracy and the use of force; (4) democratization and conflicting imperatives; and, (5) critical approaches. There are several chapters within each of these larger parts, each chapter is an essay contributed by a significant legal or international studies scholars. For students of any international interest this text is indispensable to forming cogent arguments and/or proposals.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again