Demon Days

May 24, 2005 | Format: MP3

$9.49
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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
1:07
30
2
3:15
30
3
3:45
30
4
4:35
30
5
3:50
30
6
3:42
30
7
3:50
30
8
4:55
30
9
2:45
30
10
3:33
30
11
2:13
30
12
4:05
30
13
3:19
30
14
2:11
30
15
4:28

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 23, 2005
  • Release Date: May 23, 2005
  • Label: Parlophone UK
  • Copyright: 2005 Parlophone Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2005 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 51:33
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TENKEK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (398 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #987 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

It sounds like the perfect round out to a very good album.
Busy Body
Every song in the album is different, but all have a common sound that makes the album very cohesive.
M. Rawn
I bought it because I liked the first album and I liked the song feel good inc.
Larz

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

301 of 321 people found the following review helpful By Alan Pounds on May 31, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Like you, I loved the first Gorillaz record. But also like you, I was a little worried about Gorillaz falling prey to the dreaded sophomore slump that many bands subsequently release after belting out such a stunning debut. Unfortunately, a lot of people are calling "Demon Days" just that, which couldn't be further from the truth. I can't say that I'm surprised, due to the change in the band's line up. Most notably, Dan The Automator has left the group (as well as Del), leaving Damon Albarn as the leader and creative visionary of the group (along with producer, Danger Mouse). That alone is enough to lose a few fans. But the fact is, Damon Albarn hasn't crafted anything this beautiful since Blur's 1994 "Parklife", which is truly an amazing feat. Especially considering Blur's last album "Think Tank" wasn't quite up to par. But this is very different than a Blur record. There is a real sense of liberation on Albarn's side. Gorillaz has really given him a chance to spread his wings, and let him experiment and try things he wasn't able to do with Blur. Albarn's flame has been re-ignited with this record, proving once again that his musical vision is one of a genius.

The record has a very cinematic feel to it. It possesses a lot of build-up and tear-down elements to it. The first few tracks feels like a warm up to the beautiful and chilling, "Dirty Harry", then bursting in with the climax of "Feel Good Inc." the first radio single off the record. Those two really hit hard, and the album doesn't let up until the album's lead out. "El Mañana" and "Every Planet We Reach Is Dead" are equally funky and remarkable tunes.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mark Schaefer on July 12, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Damon Albarn went to great pains to explain that the first Gorillaz album was a collaboration between him, cartoonist Jamie Hewlett, and producer Dan the Automator, but any sort of pretense to having the virtual pop group seem like a genuine collaborative band was thrown out the window for the group's long-awaited 2005 sequel, Demon Days. Hewlett still provides new animation for Gorillaz -- although the proposed feature-length film has long disappeared -- but Dan the Automator is gone, leaving Albarn as the unquestioned leader of the group. This isn't quite similar to Blur, a genuine band that faltered after Graham Coxon decided he had enough, leaving Damon behind to construct the muddled Think Tank largely on his own. No, Gorillaz were always designed as a collective, featuring many contributors and producers, all shepherded by Albarn, the songwriter, mastermind, and ringleader.

Hiding behind Hewlett's excellent cartoons gave Albarn the freedom to indulge himself, but it also gave him focus since it tied him to a specific concept. Throughout his career, Albarn always was at his best when writing in character -- to the extent that anytime he wrote confessionals in Blur, they sounded stagy -- and Gorillaz not only gave him an ideal platform, it liberated him, giving him the opportunity to try things he couldn't within the increasingly dour confines of Blur. It wasn't just that the cartoon concept made for light music -- on the first Gorillaz album, Damon sounded as if he were having fun for the first time since Parklife.
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89 of 105 people found the following review helpful By Bart Motes VINE VOICE on May 30, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This album has grown and grown on me. I wanted to write about the first six proper songs forming the heart of the album and the rest being disposable, but it's really not true. Every track has something interesting to offer. Funky beats, weird minor keys, little accents here and there. You have to appreciate the perspective of the creators of this album, the supremely playful and simultaneously world weary affect of pop veterans, who have seen it all and yet still want to mess with the form and function of their music. This is the work of an artist at the height of his powers who respects his audience. I can appreciate how people might listen to this and go WTF? But give it a chance. For every excess there's a hidden gem.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Matt Jacobs on May 6, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Some people have trouble listening to entire albums without skipping at least one track. I don't. Even if I don't love every song, if I felt enough like listening to the band to actually start it up, I can usually tolerate the weaker songs while I'm at it. I even tend to grow to like those songs on some level anyway. There are several albums I have where I do at least strongly like every song on them, though. The one thing that's pretty rare is for me to be able to specifically remember what all the songs sound like just by reading the titles. Demon Days is one of those are few.

The fact that Damon Albarn and company are able to mix such a range of genres and artists and keep all the songs unique while also creating a sense of cohesion, on top of making them all so catchy and enjoyable at the same time, is an astonishing achievement. There's rap, there's rock, there's electronica and dub and dance, there's spoken word and choir, and it's all extremely fun to listen to. My collection is almost exclusively rock, but I still find this to be one of my favorite albums to listen to. There's just something about the seamless blending of styles that makes you want to throw all your cares to the wind and just enjoy what you're listening to.

"Last Living Souls" has the most amazingly infectious electronic beat going through it the whole time. It's so good. "O Green World" has a very catchy vocal part and is another fun song. The single "Feel Good Inc" mixes a great base line and rap from De La Soul with the acoustic chorus very well. "Every Planet We Reach Is Dead" has a title that reflects the supposed darker tone of the album in relation to Gorillaz' self-titled debut, and the catchy melody reflects that in an odd way.
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