Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums Storm Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Shop Popular Services Home Theater Setup Plumbing Services Assembly Services Shop all tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage The Walking Dead\ Gear Up for Football Deal of the Day
Demosthenes of Athens and the Fall of Classical Greece and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Demosthenes of Athens and the Fall of Classical Greece 1st Edition

4 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0199931958
ISBN-10: 019993195X
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.18
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$23.21
Buy new
$32.28
More Buying Choices
14 New from $30.07 18 Used from $16.04
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$32.28 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Demosthenes of Athens and the Fall of Classical Greece + Philip II of Macedonia: Greater than Alexander + Philip II of Macedonia
Price for all three: $75.07

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Informative and lively... Catchy chapter titles and subheadings elucidate and enhance this well-referenced explication of a complex historical period, as do the detailed chronology, catalogue of orations and comprehensive index... [A] masterful conversion of Demosthenes' convoluted rhetoric into a compelling narrative." --The Classical Journal


"'Look to the end', went the ancient Greek motto, and the suicidal end of Professor Worthington's subject was far from ignoble, like much of his actively democratic political life, which is here thoroughly investigated, persuasively estimated, and ultimately celebrated as that of one who stood bravely against tyranny." --Paul Cartledge, A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture, Cambridge University, and author of Ancient Greece: A Very Short Introduction


"This is a gripping story of Macedonian ascendance, Athenian retrenchment-and the efforts of a gifted, but flawed Demosthenes to reverse the course of history. In both accessible and erudite fashion, Ian Worthington guides us through the labyrinth of Greek and Macedonian politics, and the result is not only first-rate history, but lessons for any age--ours especially--when the fear of civilizational decline, and its supposed remedies, become near obsessions." --Victor Davis Hanson, Senior Fellow, Classics and Military History, the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and author of The Other Greeks and A War Like No Other


"Demosthenes' life is a powerful case study of the conflict between democracy and monarchy, and this book will be welcomed by both scholars and non-specialist readers because it is highly accessible, fair in its treatment of controversial issues, yet not afraid to state an opinion. A must-read for anyone interested in ancient politics and rhetoric." --Joseph Roisman, Professor of Classics, Colby College, and author of Alexander's Veterans and the Early Wars of the Successors


"Ian Worthington has recently written a very fine introduction to Demosthenes' career...an erudite but readable biography. It is sober, balanced, and analytical." --Barry Strauss, The New Criterion


"A most welcome addition to the extensive scholarly literature on this subject... I would strongly recommend this well-balanced, accessible and thorough monograph to scholars and non-specialist readers." --Bryn Mawr Classical Review


About the Author


Ian Worthington is Professor of History at the University of Missouri and author of, most recently, Alexander the Great: Man and God and Philip II of Macedonia.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 5, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 019993195X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199931958
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 1.3 x 6.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,296,562 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
50%
4 star
50%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. A. Haverstick on December 24, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
After a couple of centuries of warfare, the world-historical city state of Athens is spiritually staggering. Still, a generation after the great defeat by Sparta, risen like Germany, she once more is the most influential of the cities. Sadly, in a two year attempt to tighten control over her latest empire, by about 350 she has spent nearly a billion dollars on war! (Think of this as a prosperous American city and county of about 500,00 like Lancaster Pa, where I live blowing that amount in 2 years). Also she has privatized the state silver mines and they now produce much less revenue for the citizens. Citizen attempts to regain state control are futile. The rich are increasingly exempt from taxes and, again, attempts to eliminate exemptions are futile. Political quarrels abound. Meantime, up the road, the Macedonians are buying off their neighbors and investing heavily in new (weapons) technology and rethinking how an army might be organized. When Athens finally wakes up, she's flattened by King Phillip, almost as an afterthought.

In fact, I don't really believe in history repeating itself like this. When I was young it was all about Spengler and the flabbiness of the West, a thesis now forgotten. Nonetheless, I found this book intersting reading, indeed. History doesn't repeat, said Twain, but it DOES rhyme. Many classical geeks besides me, I'll bet can't much fill in the historical details between the death of Socrate and Alexander except in broad outline. Alexander and his exploits are well covered and so's the defeat of Athens in the war with Sparta, but the intervening period where the mainland and the Pelloponese goes down to Phillip is much less known. This fills a lacuna in my knowledge, at least.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
In the history of rhetoric, Demosthenes of Athens (circa 384-322 B.C.) was considered to be one of the great classical orators. This biography examines his life in the context of his involvement in Athenian social and political life, the contentious rivalries of the various Greek city-states, and King Phillip II of Macedonia's rise to power and later conquest of the Greek city states. Although the author disclaims any intent to focus on Demosthenes as an orator, the author does discuss Demosthenes's use of rhetoric as a public figure involved in Athenian domestic politics and in Athenian policy with respect to other Greek city-states and foreign countries.

The author provides a scholarly look at the life and times of Demosthenes that cites many primary and secondary sources. The author occasionally seeks to explore the motivations of Demosthenes and other people involved in the various events discussed. While the author's surmises and speculations about the motivations of Demosthenes and others are occasionally interesting and thought-provoking, such explorations are generally speculative in nature because of the sketchy and incomplete nature of the historical record. Although thoughtful and intriguing, the author's conjectures and extrapolations are not an adequate substitute for supporting documentary evidence.

This book is scholarly in style and tone, and probably would not be satisfying to readers looking for more casual biographies or histories. Readers interested in the history of classical rhetoric might find it worthwhile as a source of information about the circumstances and contexts in which Demosthenes used rhetoric. Because the book focuses on Demosthenes, persons primarily interested in the rise of King Phillip II of Macedonia and his conquest of the Greek city-states should read this book in conjunction with other pertinent publications.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Wabbit98 on November 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It was a time of change in Ancient Greece, Alexander the Great was on the upswing and Athens was on the downward spiral. In that mix rose a group of orators, and politicians, that would usher in a new age; a period of time that they wanted to avoid. In this new work by Ian Worthington, which is written for a general audience, he takes us through the world of Demosthenes and his life and times. From his early childhood where his family spent all his money; to his slow rise through the law courts of Athens, and his eventual breakout in the political world. His early speeches advocated a sensible foreign policy, which would keep Athens away from disastrous wars. It was only with the rise of Philip, the father of Alexander, that he would change his stance. His surviving speeches all attack Philip, and put Athens on top of the mountain. But things could not stay the same forever, and eventually Philip won the day. But Demosthenes would live longer than either Philip or Alexander, only killing himself instead of being executed.

Mr. Worthington acknowledges that this is not the easiest biography to write; with a lack of primary sources, and the few surviving ones are not exactly balanced and fair. But he does an excellent job of placing Demosthenes in his proper context in the larger world of geopolitical politics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Basil E. Lallos on March 9, 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
good service good book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Demosthenes of Athens and the Fall of Classical Greece
This item: Demosthenes of Athens and the Fall of Classical Greece
Price: $32.28
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: delphi league