The Dukes of Hazzard 7 Seasons 1979

Amazon Instant Video

Season 1
(231) IMDb 7.4/10

10. Deputy Dukes TV-PG CC

When Sheriff Rosco Coltrane makes Bo and Luke Duke his deputies to help bring Public Enemy Number One to Hazzard for a trial, the road is rougher than the boys had bargained for.

Starring:
Tom Wopat, John Schneider
Runtime:
50 minutes
Original air date:
April 13, 1979

Deputy Dukes

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.
Season 1

Product Details

Genres Adventure, Action, Comedy
Director William Asher
Starring Tom Wopat, John Schneider
Supporting actors Catherine Bach, Denver Pyle, James Best, Sorrell Booke, Ben Jones, Waylon Jennings, Sonny Shroyer, Stella Parton, Leo Gordon, Norman Alden, Robert F. Hoy, Pat Renella, Suzanne Niles, Tara Preston, William 'Billy' Benedict
Season year 1979
Network Warner Bros.
Producers Rod Amateau, David S. Grant, Paul R. Picard, Ralph Riskin, Albert J. Salzer, Gy Waldron, Skip Ward
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Fun shows.....good old family fun!, My grandsons love it!!
Randy Scott
One of the special features is a preview of the Dukes of Hazzard video game.
Hankster
A must-have DVD set, even the box looks good on the shelf.
Andrew Hoover

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

109 of 112 people found the following review helpful By C. T. Morris on April 18, 2004
Format: DVD
Finally, the first season of Dukes on DVD. The characters took some time to flesh out before they became the stereotypical heroes and villians that most viewers remember the show for. In the beginning, Rosco was more of a corrupt cop and less of a lovable dope, which in many ways I prefer. Boss Hogg was also a bit more intelligent of a character in the beginning. And rather than just basing shows on car chases and "how to frame the Dukes this week" as in later seasons, the first episodes were intelligently written schemes that the viewer can easily get lost (in a good way) as to what's going on. The first five episodes were filmed in Covington, GA (before they moved to familiar backlot in Burbank, CA), and you really get the sense that these are southern people in the South, rather than the stereotypical backwoods feeling you get from the Burbank episodes. That these early episodes focused more on plot is most evident in "Mary Kay's Baby," the only episode in all seven seasons to not feature the General Lee. And personally, I'll buy this set just to get "Daisy's Song": since there were only 13 episodes in the first season, when Columbia House distributed these episodes on VHS cassette at two shows per tape, this is the show that got left out of their catalogue.
Also worth noting is that when TNN was showing the Dukes a few years back, heavy edits had to be made to each show to fit modern commercial breaks. When I got Columbia House's versions, I found that significant chunks, usually integral to understanding the plot of a given episode, were now present and accounted for. Having all 13 episodes available without edit is another reason worth picking this up as opposed to watching it on television.
By the end of the season, the characters were already becoming what we remember them to be, in my opinion, for the atmosphere and for the writing, season one is the best of the series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
53 of 56 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 17, 2004
Format: DVD
I haven't purchased the dvd set yet. Out of stock in my area. I want to comment on the talk of racism of the show. As a 30 year old Black man, that watched the show religiously growing up, I find no racism in the show at all. Sure they weren't as many Blacks regularly on the show, that doesn't come from the tone of the show, that's comes from the politics of Hollywood at the time.

I was born and raised in DC, spent my summers in NC. In fact, I now live in NC, so the good nature of the south has always been in me. I can relate to the Dukes and their struggle. Here is a show about two guys, no mention of their fathers, growing up poor, always helping their fellow man or woman, stood up for what was right, even against the law. Now if this isn't an example of an honest Black male growing up in the inner city, I don't know what is.

Forget color!!! This show was about family, struggle, triumph, heroism. If we as people lived as thoughtful and caring as the Dukes, the entire world would be a better place. I can't wait for season 2. Also check out the A-Team dvd set. I love the 80's shows!!!
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
38 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Ben on May 24, 2004
Format: DVD
I challenge anyone to find a single instance of racism in the whole series. You won't because there aren't any. As for Robert E Lee - he did not found the KKK and was never a member. The KKK was founded by Nathan Bedford Forrest. (Didn't you ever watch Forrest Gump? His name contributes to one of the first scenes in the movie.) General Lee did fight for the Confederacy, but it was only because of his belief in states' rights, not for slavery. In fact, he inherited 130 slaves and promptly freed them due to his hatred of the institution of slavery.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Harry on May 16, 2004
Format: DVD
I grew up watching the Dukes of Hazzard on TV. It was good back then, and it is just as good today, maybe even better. The plot is fairly simple, it does not really take a detective to watch the show. You have the Duke boys, who Boss Hogg wants to send back to jail because they keep thwarting his scams. Thier Uncle Jessie, who they live with, was at one time a moonshiner who now is a lawful citizen. Now Boss Hogg is not an angel himself, he is always comming up with a scam to make money, and the Duke boys often find themselves in the middle of it. But all is not lost, because Uncle Jessie, Daisy, and Cooter will come to the rescue to make everything alright again in Hazzard County.
I think what I liked most about this show was, for the half an hour it was on tv, it was a break from reality. You got to see basically good people having a good time. Even Boss Hogg, the "bad guy" in the series had a good heart, although he was a little greedy with the fried chicken and money. I laughed every time he smacked Rosco's hand when Rosco tried to take a peice of fried chicken. And I loved the car, watching the General Lee jump creeks, ponds, barns and other cars. Daisy was as sweet a southern bell as any I have ever seen. And Rosco often had me laughing so hard, with his little noises and facial expressions. I highly reccomend this series. Anyone who has a kids heart will love this show.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Gary A. Miller on March 25, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Let the Legend Begin (First Season)
The Dukes of Hazzard was rushed into production near the end of 1978, when the first few episodes were filmed in Covington, GA. Not until the Dukes proved to be an immediate hit was the Hazzard set built at the Warner Brothers lot in Burbank, CA.
(#1) "One Armed Bandits", January 26, 1979
The three Duke cousins root out evil in backwater Hazzard County in this series, which opens with the trio on the trail of a sheriff who is smuggling illegal slot machines into the area. Waylon Jennings wrote and performs the music, and punctuates the action with his off-screen homilies.
(#2) "Daisy's Song", February 2, 1979
Bo and Luke have suspicions about a music-publishing business that is bilking would-be composer Daisy. What they don't suspect is that Boss Hogg is in on the racket, or that the FBI is watching the entire operation.
(#3) "Mary Kaye's Baby", February 9, 1979
A borrowed car carrying moonshine and a pregnant hitchhiker carrying hot money add up to a wild and woolly car chase for Bo and Luke.
(#4) "Repo Men", February 16, 1979
Bo and Luke are duped into taking part in a car-repossession scheme that involves them with ruthless counterfeiters and could send them back to prison for violating parole.
(#5) "High Octane", February 23, 1979
A contest for a workable fossil-fuel substitute offers the Dukes a big cash prize and a patriotic excuse to resurrect the old still that produced high-octane corn liquor for years. Almost as tempting is the beautiful revenue agent who interrupts their work.
(#6) "Swamp Molly", March 9, 1979
Uncle Jesse yields to the coaxing of Swamp Molly, an old moonshining colleague who was - and still is - sweet on him.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again